Call for Papers for two issues of American Literature

DEADLINE EXTENDED: The new deadline for these two calls for papers is October 30th, 2013

Submissions of 11,000 words or less (including endnotes and references) should be submitted electronically at www.editorialmanager.com/al/default.asp by October 30, 2013. When choosing a submission type, select “New Submission-Special Issue.” For assistance with the submission process, please contact the office of American Literature at 919–684–3396 or am-lit@duke.edu.


About the issues:

“After the Postsecular:”
Ddal_85_2

Our aim in this special issue is to collect scholarship that is “after
the postsecular” in at least two senses. First, we solicit work that follows
the postsecular move all the way to its logical ends, work that dislodges the
premise that the unfolding of modernity is synonymous with secularization and with
the divisions and disenchantments understood to follow from it. This release
from the codings of secularist presumption—codings of belief, of politics and
political engagement, and not least of the body itself—can have, we believe,
the salutary effect of making available fresh lines of inquiry into some of the
most contentious, consequential aspects of American life, many of which
encompass but also expand considerably beyond the purview of the history of
religion: race and Atlantic slavery; gender and sentimental culture; emerging technologies
of representation; indigeneity and sovereignty; sex and intimate life; and the
politics of canonicity itself. Second, we invite submissions that are “after
the postsecular” in the sense of seeking to move beyond such a paradigm. How
might the postsecular paradigm be inadequate both in general and in particular
so far as the American case is concerned? How do we grapple with supple
redefinitions of secularism itself, in the work of scholars like Charles
Taylor, Talal Asad, and John Modern? What better terms and approaches can we
adopt in order to understand better what our objects of study are doing?

Special issue editors: Peter Coviello and Jared Hickman. Submissions of
11,000 words or less (including endnotes and references) should be submitted
electronically at www.editorialmanager.com/al/default.asp by October 30, 2013.
When choosing a submission type, select New SubmissionSpecial Issue.” For
assistance with the submission process, please contact the office of American Literature
at 919–684–3396 or am-lit@duke.edu. Please direct other questions to Peter Coviello
(pcoviell@bowdoin.edu) or Jared Hickman ( jhickman@jhu.edu).

Ddal_85_1“Pedagogy: Critical Practices for a Changing World:”

With this special issue we offer an opportunity to consider pedagogy as
increasingly the site where political and economic pressures are grappled with
and addressed, including the widening gap between the sophistication of
scholarship and critical practice in the field of American literature and the current
direction of institutional politics and practices. We thus ask contributors to
consider how critical practices that define our work as scholars and educators
must adjust to, revise, intervene in, and be repurposed for a world where
for-profit online companies, state and federal mandates for measurable learning
outcomes, and budget constraints are driving educational practices toward
instrumentality and commodification. To this end, we seek essays that
rearticulate the value of our work by reconsidering pedagogy in relation to the
field of American Literature broadly construed.

Rather than focusing on a particular teaching strategy or text, we seek
essays that approach the topic from larger philosophical perspectives. We also
seek essays that chart the influence of current critical practices on the field
of American Literature. How does teaching American literature in prisons across
the country, for example, address issues of canon in relation to long and broad
histories of genocide and incarceration, or how have bilingual teaching
practices in Latina/o, American Indian, or immigrant communities shifted the
terrain and political engagement of American literary study? Why teach literary
texts and why teach literary texts that purport to be nation based? In
addition, essays addressing the effect of cross-sectoral pedagogy on the
discipline might look at how American literature moves beyond the academy into
alternative learning spaces, through service learning, online education, or
crossover training for graduate students. This issue also asks how the robust
efforts of our field in transnational, multicultural, gender/sexualities, and
race-based theories have led to the rearticulation of a richer
pedagogy/critical practice as well as a more expansive understanding of
“American literature” historically, materially, and in the context of
globalization.

Submissions of 11,000 words or less (including endnotes and references)
should be submitted electronically at www.editorialmanager.com/al/default.asp
by October 30, 2013. When choosing a submission type, select “New
Submission-Special Issue.” For assistance with the submission process, please
contact the office of American Literature at 919–684–3396 or am-lit@duke.edu.
For questions please contact any or all of the coeditors: Carol Batker
(cjbatker@usfca.edu); Gillian Harkins (gharkins@u.washington.edu); Augusta
Rohrbach (augustarohrbach@gmail.com); Alys Weinbaum (alysw@u.washington.edu).

About American Literature:

American Literature has been regarded since its inception as the
preeminent periodical in its field. Each issue contains articles covering the
works of several American authors—from colonial to contemporary—as well as an
extensive book review section; a “Brief Mention” section offering citations of
new editions and reprints, collections, anthologies, and other professional
books; and an “Announcements” section that keeps readers up-to-date on prizes,
competitions, conferences, grants, and publishing opportunities.

For more
information and submission guidelines, please visit: http://www.dukeupress.edu/American-Literature/?viewby=journal#submissions

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