Courtney Berger’s New Title Recommendations

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You know you want to take advantage of our great 50% sale, but are you overwhelmed by your choices? Let Senior Editor Courtney Berger’s suggestions guide you. Here are her top ten recent titles to buy during the sale. Just enter coupon code STOCKUP at checkout.

alien capital
 This book retheorizes the history and logic of settler colonialism by examining its intersection with Asian racialization and capitalism, showing how the conflation of Asian immigrants to Canada and the United states with the abstract dimensions of capital became settler colonialism’s defining feature.
bioinse

 

 A presentation of  how twentieth-century U.S. imperial expansion was dependent on controlling the spread of disease through the transformation of humans, animals, bacteria, and viruses into living theaters of warfare and securitization.

 

Mohawk Interruptus
 A bold challenge to dominant thinking in the fields of Native studies and anthropology. Combining political theory with ethnographic research among the Mohawks of Kahnawà:ke, a reserve community in what is now southwestern Quebec, Simpson examines their struggles to articulate and maintain political sovereignty through centuries of settler colonialism.

 

movement

 

 An examination of the roles of mobility and immobility in the history of political thought and the structuring of political spaces.

 

dark
Simone Browne, Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness
Browne shows how racial ideologies and the long history of policing black bodies under transatlantic slavery structure contemporary surveillance technologies and practices. Analyzing a wide array of archival and contemporary texts, she demonstrates how surveillance reifies boundaries, borders, and bodies around racial lines.

 

feminitS
Rachel E. Dubrofsky and Shoshana Amielle Magnet, Feminist Surveillance Studies
A field-defining collection that places gender, race, class, and sexuality at the center of surveillance studies. Concerned with exposing the ways in which surveillance is tied to discrimination, the contributors investigate what constitutes surveillance, who is scrutinized, why, and at what cost.

 

The Undersea Network
Nicole Starosielski, The Undersea Network
This book examines undersea communication cable network, bringing it to the surface of media scholarship and making visible the “wireless” network’s materiality. Starosielski argues that the network is inextricably linked to historical and political factors and that it is precarious, rural, aquatic, territorially entrench and semi-centralized.

gut

 

Elizabeth Wilson, Gut Feminism
 This study shakes feminist theory from its resistance to biological and pharmaceutical data and urges that now is the time for feminism to critically engage with biology. Doing so will reanimate feminist theory, strengthening its ability to address depression, affect, gender, and feminist politics.

 

brain.jpg
Victoria Pitts-Taylor, The Brain′s Body: Neuroscience and Corporeal Politics

 Victoria Pitts-Taylor applies feminist and critical theory to recent developments in neuroscience and new materialist social thought to demonstrate how the brain interacts with and is impacted by power, social structures, and inequality.

 

sound

Michel Chion, Sound: An Acoulogical Treatise
Appearing here in English for the first time, Michel Chion’s study addresses the philosophical questions that inform our encounters with sound, stimulating our thinking about being open to new sounds and to explore the links between language, technology, culture, and hearing.

 

These great books and all other in-stock titles are 50% off through June 20. See the fine print here. Shop now!

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