Bernard Stiegler: Amateur Philosophy

ddbou_44_1The most recent issue of boundary 2, “Bernard Stiegler: Amateur Philosophy,” edited by Arne De Boever, brings together three lectures on aesthetics delivered by the French philosopher Bernard Stiegler in Los Angeles in 2011 with articles by scholars of Stiegler’s work.

Aesthetics, understood as the theoretical investigation of sensibility, has been central to Stiegler’s work since the mid-1990s. The lectures featured here explicitly link Stiegler’s interest in sensibility to aesthetic theory proper as well as to art history. In “The Proletarianization of Sensibility,” “Kant, Art, and Time,” and “The Quarrel of the Amateurs,” Stiegler expounds his philosophy of technics and its effects on human sensibility, centering on how the figure of the amateur—who loves what he or she does—must be recovered from beneath the ruins of technical history. The other contributors engage the topics covered in the lectures, including the figure of the amateur, cinema, the digital, and extinction.

Browse the table-of-contents and read the introduction to the issue by guest editor Arne De Boever, made freely available.

For more readings on Stiegler, revisit this 2010 issue of Cultural Politics featuring an interview with Bernard Stiegler, “Knowledge, Care, and Trans-Individuation.”

3 comments

  1. most ideas contain ideas of Euclidean and Non Euclidean forms as observed prof dr mircea orasanu and prof horia orasanu as followed
    DEDEKIND AND CANTOR RESULTS AND THEORIES
    ABSTRACT
    We can perform a similar “trick” for functions of two variables. The volume under f is given by . But we could treat this volume as a solid whose cross section is shaped like R and whose height is the average value of f over the region R:

    To envision this, think of building the volume under z=f(x,y) as a solid mass of wax. Trap the wax inside a tube whose cross-section looks like R. As the wax melts, it will eventually form a solid whose height is equal to the average value of f on the region R.

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