Q&A with Lynn Comella, author of Vibrator Nation

lynn_comella_by_krystal_ramirez_smallLynn Comella is Associate Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. An award-winning researcher, she has written extensively about sexuality and culture for numerous academic publications and popular media outlets. She is coeditor of the comprehensive New Views on Pornography: Sexuality, Politics, and the Law, and a frequent media contributor. In Vibrator Nation: How Feminist Sex-Toy Stores Changed the Business of Pleasure—the first book to tell the story of feminist sex-toy stores and the women who pioneered them—she takes a deep dive into the making of the consumer market for sex toys, tracing its emergence from the early 1970s to today. Drawing on more than eighty in-depth interviews with retailers and industry insiders, including a stint working as a vibrator clerk, she brings readers onto the sex-shop floor and into the world of sex-positive capitalism and cultural production. Lynn Comella is on a national tour this fall and winter; check back here next week for a full tour schedule.

art1Why did you decide to research feminist sex-toy businesses and how did you conduct your research?

I’ve long been interested in the politics of sexual representation, from the feminist sex wars of the 1980s to debates over school-based sex education. When I started this project, which began as a seminar paper in graduate school, I was really interested in the various ways in which female sexuality assumed a public presence as opposed to being relegated to the privacy of the home. As luck would have it, a feminist sex-toy shop, Intimacies, had just opened in the college town where I lived. I decided to make the store the focus of a small pilot study in an effort to better understand what made this female-friendly vibrator business different from more conventional adult stores ostensibly geared toward men. I quickly realized that Intimacies was part of a larger network of women-run, educationally oriented vibrator shops located in cities across the country that had all adopted a similar way of selling sex toys and talking about sex. I wanted to know more about what united these businesses together and how they attempted to practice feminist politics through the marketplace. What were the sexual vernaculars, retail strategies, philosophies, challenges and paradoxes that had shaped these businesses?

Researching the history of feminist sex-toy stores sent me down a rabbit hole. It took years and multiple methods of data collection—ethnographic fieldwork, in-depth interviews, and archival research—to weave together the various historical threads that shaped these businesses and the larger women’s market for sex toys and pornography. Writing the book I wanted to write, one that took a deep dive into the making of a market, required a kind of methodological promiscuity: I worked as a vibrator clerk at Babeland in New York City where I sold my fair share of sex toys, answered customer questions, and crossed my fingers that my cash register balanced at the end of the night. I interviewed more than eighty feminist retailers, employees, and industry insiders. I toured dildo manufacturing companies and lube factories, and attended more than a dozen adult industry trade shows where I sat in on business seminars that discussed marketing sex toys to women, retail-based sex education, and the Fifty Shades of Grey phenomenon. I poured through dusty boxes filled with corporate documents, internal memos, customer letters, advertisements, news clippings, and more, and amassed a research archive teeming with sex-toy ephemera (which I’m having a lot of fun sharing on the vibrator_nation Instagram account).

What was it like for women to purchase sex toys before the mid-1970s? What were feminist entrepreneurs trying to change?

There weren’t a lot of opportunities for the average woman to comfortably buy vibrators in the early 1970s. Conventional adult stores weren’t designed with female shoppers in mind; reputable mail-order businesses that sold so-called marital aids were few and far between; and women walking into a department store—or any store, really—to buy a vibrating massager risked encountering a male clerk who might say, “Boy, you must really need it bad, sweetie pie.” What made the situation all the more frustrating for many women was that they were being told by feminist sex educators and therapists that they should masturbate and take control of their orgasms. Vibrators were being framed as tools of liberation, but getting one wasn’t easy. Early feminist retailers, such as Dell Williams, who founded Eve’s Garden in 1974, and Joani Blank who opened Good Vibrations several years later, stepped into this breach. They turned the traditional model of an adult store, with its “seamy” aura and X-rated style, on its head in an effort to appeal to female shoppers. What made these early feminist vibrator businesses so revolutionary, and what set them apart from their more conventional counterparts geared toward men, wasn’t just their focus on women, but their entire way of doing business. They led with sex education not titillation, and worked to advance a social mission that included putting a vibrator on the bedside table of every woman, everywhere, because they believed that access to accurate sexual information and quality products had the potential to make everyone’s lives better.

In the book you describe a “sex-positive diaspora” of feminist retailers. What do you mean by that?

One of the things that I found so interesting during the early stages of my research was the degree to which feminist business owners tipped their hats to Good Vibrations. Many of them credited the company’s founder, Joani Blank, a sex therapist with a master’s degree in public health, with helping them start their businesses. Blank had a very non-competitive approach to running a company and strongly believed that the more businesses that were doing what Good Vibrations was doing—selling vibrators and talking openly about sex—the better. Blank freely shared information and vendor lists with aspiring entrepreneurs, and in the early 1990s she started a short-lived internship program to train people how to run a business like Good Vibrations. The first, and only, two people to complete the internship program were Claire Cavanah, who along with Rachel Venning would go on to found Babeland in 1993, and Kim Airs who started Grand Opening in Boston that same year. Blank’s communitarian, non-competitive ethos created a ripple effect and by the early 1990s, Good Vibrations’ DNA had begun to spread to cities across the country. In time, people who worked at Babeland and Grand Opening branched out and started their own feminist vibrator shops and Good Vibrations’ sex-positive mission continued to replicate. I wanted a phrase that captured this movement and dispersal, and the description “sex-positive diaspora” seemed to do that.

What role have lesbians and queer-identified retailers and people of color played in the history of feminist sex-toy business?

Lesbians and queer-identified retailers, along with queer and transgender employees, have played a major role in shaping the history of feminist sex-toy businesses. They opened stores, worked on the sales floor, started sex-toy manufacturing companies, wrote “how to” guides, and made pornography. In these different ways they’ve been important nodes of transmission and sources of queer sexual knowledge, including for straight people. In fact, I’d argue that the history of feminist sex-toy stores is also, and very much so, a story about queer entrepreneurship and cultural production. For many of the businesses that I write about in Vibrator Nation, their identities as queer and trans-inclusive companies are as important, if not more so, than their feminist identities. And yet, it’s also the case that these businesses have historically been very white. If you look at photos of Good Vibrations staff from the 1980s, for example, everyone is white and female. So it’s perhaps not surprising that some customers got the impression that Good Vibrations was a white women’s store—even as the company worked hard to change that perception and diversity its staff. This was certainly how Oakland-based retailer Nenna Joiner, the founder of Feelmore, experienced Good Vibrations when she first discovered the company in the late 1990s. Although she loved what the store offered, she didn’t see any images that represented her. She realized there was a need in the African American community for more diverse sexual images and resources, and decided to start a business that could deliver what she felt was missing from other women-run sex-toy stores.

How have feminist sex toy stores remained true to their mission while also turning a profit?

The ongoing tension between profitability and social change is a thread that runs throughout Vibrator Nation. Many of the retailers I write about started their businesses because they saw their stores as a feminist way to empower women (and eventually everyone). They led with a mission of social change rather than capitalist aspirations. Good Vibrations’ Joani Blank once told me that profits were secondary to everything that was important to her about running a successful business. And if you read the mission statements of many of the businesses that followed in Good Vibrations’ footsteps, they’re all about promoting sex education and personal transformation and creating a more passionate world. There’s almost no mention of making money. As one of my interviewees pointed out, if you don’t put profitability in your mission statement, it’s easy to forget about it. In some cases, it took a severe financial crisis for retailers to realize they needed to cultivate new forms of business expertise and foster attitudes in which money was seen as friend instead of foe, something that not only greased the wheels of social change but kept those wheels spinning.

How did feminists end up changing the adult industry?

Perhaps the most dramatic shift over the past forty years is the acknowledgment on the part of mainstream adult retailers, manufacturers, and porn producers that the sex industry is no longer a world of men. In a post Sex and the City and Fifty Shades of Grey era, this statement might seem glaringly obvious, but it wasn’t that long ago that women found themselves marginalized in an industry largely dominated by men and steeped in sexism. I heard stories during my research of female product buyers with budgets of upwards of $3,000,000 annually who couldn’t get the time of day at adult novelty trade shows. Men would look right past them. And that was in the early 2000s. Feminists played an absolutely central role in creating a market that is now widely regarded as one of the hottest growth segments of the adult industry. Today, women are trusted authorities who routinely hold the microphone in seminar rooms filled with wholesalers, distributors, retailers, and content producers eager to mine their expertise. There have been other important changes, too, most notably in regard to sex-toy manufacturing and marketing. By the early 1990s women were placing new demands on the adult novelty sector. Good Vibrations began offering warranties and started sending defective merchandise back to manufacturers, letting them know they weren’t going to settle for cheaply made products that conked out after one use. Manufacturers started making products that looked prettier, had better motors, and used non-toxic and body safe materials. Sex-toy packaging with images of sultry porn starlets has been replaced with softer, more colorful, and sanitized imagery. Messages about sexual health and education, rather than titillation, are regularly used as marketing platforms. Art school grads and mechanical engineers are bringing elements of sleek design and quality manufacturing to an industry that used to revolve around the idea of planned obsolescence where nothing was made to last. It’s a far cry from what the adult industry looked like in the early 1970s when Dell Williams and Joani Blank took a bold leap of faith and started their small, women-friendly vibrator businesses.

What are some of the challenges of doing scholarly work on the sex industry?

What it means to do scholarly work on the sex industry has changed quite a bit over the past 15 years. When I was completing my Ph.D. in the early 2000s, academic research on the adult industry was hardly typical and it wasn’t unusual for someone to raise an eyebrow when I told them that I was researching feminist sex-toy stores. They were intrigued but often skeptical about the scholarly merits of such research. Although academic research on the adult industry is still not the norm, there’s a growing, international network of sexuality scholars—historians, sociologists, media studies practitioners, and others—who study pornography and other facets of the adult entertainment industry in an effort to better understand this extremely profitable yet under-examined segment of popular culture. This scholarship is increasingly finding institutional support not only in the form of tenure-track academic appointments, but in academic journals and professional organizations, too. Additionally, more and more academic presses are realizing that there’s a market for well-researched books about pornography and the sex industry, and are building their lists according. As for the nitty-gritty of researching the sex industry, it’s really no different than studying any other cultural phenomenon: you approach it ethically, rigorously, and systematically. The less we exoticize sexuality research, and the more we treat it with the seriousness that we might approach other scholarly topics, the better this research will be.

You can order Vibrator Nation from your favorite local or online bookstore (print and e-editions available) or order directly from Duke University Press. Use coupon code E17COMEL to save 30%.

 

37 comments

  1. As a man, I kind of think the same thing about porn. Who needs a partner? It’s only complicated and confusing, all that coupling and meeting someone else’s needs instead of getting what YOU want. But…sometimes – there’s a woman… and she…. and I….well, I’m not telling everyone, you know…but the orgasm isn’t everything…and it’s not worth too much “bargaining”…although we do not realize that sexual drive lies underneath conscious reasoning, a reptile in our brains, that snake with the apple…and oh, no! I fell for it again!(Isn’t she lovely? Stevie Wonder take it away!)

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Further comment (after reading article): This is what the post bodily fluid world has needed: frank talk about the business of getting better control (personally) of “natural instincts” that we know we don’t want to be controlled by. Do you need to be a kneel-down “service” in a relationship that shouldn’t be based on sexual appetites, or perhaps move towards the more pure and meaningful intellectual meanings in “intimacy” beyond flesh? Can you dispose of those appetites driven by insane marketers with crappy sex slapped over everything, settle your own needs, “After the dildo, I’m still in love with you.” ?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I think that satisfying sex is an important part of a relationship, because sexual health is an important part of life. Intellectual intimacy is so incredibly fulfilling when you find someone who is on your level, but lets not forget that we are animals with biological needs.

      I realize that most women (and some men) won’t resonate with this, but vibrators and dildos have always felt so unnatural and unappealing to me – the feeling of an artificial piece of rubber down there, ugh it makes me cringe!
      I think more people should take sexual health more serious, not in a shameful way, but especially if you have a partner, make sure you’re expressing your needs and doing everything you can to fulfill their’s, and then there’s no need for toys!

      Liked by 4 people

  3. Interesting… I purchased my first vibrator at age 20 that was back in 1987, it was made of hard plastic, and didn’t look like anything at all. The desire of personal satisfaction, without the need of a partner. Shortly after I met the beaver. Now that was a piece of art.. back in those years believe it or not the beaver was priced at $60 today they can go up to $350. + And that’s in the sex shops. But on line there are sites “pink cherry” for example were the prices are much more reasonable. I always believed, a women should explore her body and know exactly what makes her quiver. And the use of vibrators or manual masturbation is a must for women more over than what it is for men.

    Liked by 8 people

  4. It always seems a bit abstract when things are put in a perspective. Pleasure derived from within has no compare. I totally get your point.

    I have just been welcomed into the wordpress family, could you please review some of my short stories? I think the third Fire story would interest you.

    I would love to hear your thoughts, thank you.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Hey, sorry i was being nosey and had a look! How beautifully you write! Do you know that there are online communities that share short stories similar to yours and they all rate eachother. I cant remember what the app is called ( helpful eh!) But i know that publishers go on them and contact people who have high ratings. I think earth 2 would do pretty well on it.
      Keep in contact so if i rememeber the name i’l let you know. Han x
      ordinarypursuitofhappiness.wordpress.com

      Liked by 4 people

      1. Thank you so much. You know what actually helped me? I was having one of those doubt filled days and your comment made my doubts disappear, if only for a few moments.
        Thank you for those moments.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I really liked this Q&A style. I got drawn in very quickly about a subject i didn’t THINK I would be interested in. But it was relatable, though provoking stuff. X
    ordinarypursuitofhappiness.wordpress.com

    Liked by 4 people

  6. My Irish ex cried for days when her wee got stolen by a TSA agent at the Airport. Who robs someone of their Sex toy and why on earth would you? That’s like stilling someones use toothbrush…

    Liked by 5 people

  7. This is such an interesting interview! I really appreciate the acknowledgment of the work lesbian and queer women have done in to sell vibrators and promote a sex-positive outlook to life. I run a blog where I aim to dismantle biphobia and bi-invisibility by interviewing bisexuals and providing a platform for their specific issues to be explored. A lot of the discussion recently has been focused on how damaging the hyper-sexualisation of bisexuality is when it comes to forming relationships and understanding your own identity. If everyone was a bit more sex-positive I think that would really help out! Thanks for doing such good work 😊

    Liked by 5 people

  8. Great interview. I like your straightforward style.
    Lynn mentions the pioneering work of Joani Blank. There’s even more about Joani’s work than the many things mentioned. One other way she helped so many (women and men) get in better touch with themselves was through her heart-opening work. She was an active member of the HAI – Human Awareness Institute – community, where she helped people learn how to love themselves, well beyond the physical. Through HAI, Joani helped many discover their own and other’s flavors of gender and sexuality. Her work went beyond sex-positive towards one where people could co-create their world, and feel more acceptance and love.
    Sadly, Joani passed away suddenly last year. However, the expansion is continuing through work like Lynn’s latest book and what’s going on at Duke and HAI.
    Thanks for what you’re doing to help people step into their own light (with or without batteries)
    Vincent

    Liked by 4 people

  9. You’d be surprised at how many people read what they hitherto dare not discuss. It’s bold and audacious to discuss this concept without sounding offensive, yet hitting the high notes and stressing the need-factor. I don’t know how this would resonate with couples, but no guy would be pleased to know that his partner has an AI – dildo in his place.

    Liked by 4 people

  10. Excellent, well-balanced post – thanks for this. I, however, am not convinced that increased emphasis/attention on the ‘sex industry’ is a good thing – either for men or women – this is not to suggest that sexuality isn’t important. Instead it is to suggest that if an individual’s sexuality is being made ever more welcome to mercenary exploitation (i.e. the making-money industry), we lose yet another key aspect of ‘self’ to mass marketing.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Mysteries of India volume 2 part 1

    https://nidcw.wordpress.com

    So we are continuing the journey of southern Indian state Kerala ‘s temple called “sabarimala” the sabarimala temple’s god is lord sastha.lord sastha’s father is lord Shiva (lord of destruction)and mother is lord Vishnu(god of happiness and life).yes you read it right lord Vishnu is a male god then how can he be a mother,to kill an immortal asura(devil ) the lord Vishnu appeared as a beautiful women called (mohini) and he /she defeated that asura .After that lord Shiva fell in love with mohini aka lord Vishnu.Due to their relationship baby lord sastha born.Due to the gods problemas just like us they also have family problems .They have to give away their son.They give the son to the king of panthalam and lord sastha gradually brought up as prince of panthalam

    Liked by 2 people

  12. This was a good read especially since I am a new sex blogger trying to help educate and promote sex positivity in a world, that is still shy and ignorant about the magic of sex. I hope to catch her on tour. I would also love to review her book for my blog.

    Liked by 1 person

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