Trans Awareness Week: Resources from the Press

Trans Awareness Week, which leads up to the international Trans Day of Remembrance on November 19, is dedicated to transgender advocacy and awareness. We stand in solidarity with members of the trans community by sharing some of our most recent scholarship on trans studies.

readtorespondOur “Trans Rights” and “Bathroom Politics” reading lists include books and journal articles that address issues relevant to the trans community, from the recent bathroom ban to trans-inclusive feminism. The journal articles included in these lists are freely available through December 15, 2017, and book introductions are always freely available.

http://saq.dukejournals.org/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=blog%20post&utm_campaign=j-transawareness_Nov2017The essays in South Atlantic Quarterly’s “Against the Day” section “Unrecognizable: On Trans Recognition in 2017” confront urgent questions regarding transgender recognition in the current political moment. Since Trump was elected, trans communities in the United States have expressed fear and outrage at the possibility that the “transgender tipping point” might be about to tip back. However, contributors to these essays explore the complicated relationship of the trans community to the “transgender tipping point” and express that even if recognition is inevitable, trans people may not always want to be identified. These essays invent new terms to describe the impossibility and violence of recognition and speculatively suggest an entirely different relation to visibility. In relation to the backlash, too, they argue that we cannot do trans politics without an analysis of political economy, of the history of racialization and the violence of liberalism, and of hetero- and gender normativity.

978-0-8223-6914-1Developed in the United States in the 1980s, facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of bone and soft tissue reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of trans- women. In The Look of a Woman Eric Plemons foregrounds the narratives of FFS patients and their surgeons as they move from consultation and the operating room to postsurgery recovery. He shows how the increasing popularity of FFS represents a shift away from genital-based conceptions of trans- selfhood in ways that mirror the evolving views of what is considered to be good trans- medicine.

 

FORTHCOMING FROM TSQ: TRANSGENDER STUDIES QUARTERLY

ddtsq_4_3_4_coverTranspsychoanalysis
edited by Sheila L. Cavanagh

While psychoanalysis has traditionally been at odds with transgender issues, a growing body of revisionist psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice has begun to tease out the trans-affirming potential of the field. “Transpsychoanalysis,” features essays that highlight this potential by simultaneously critiquing and working within the boundaries of psychoanalytic concepts and theories guiding clinical work. Featuring a range of clinicians and scholars, this issue centers on questions pertaining to trans experience, desire, difference, otherness, identification, loss, mourning, and embodiment. The contributors explore these questions through topics like Tiresian mythology, bathroom bans, ethics, popular culture, and the Freudian couch. By setting up this dialogue between psychosocial studies and trans cultural studies, this revisionist work may radically transform psychoanalytic theory and practice.

“Transpsychoanalysis,” volume 4, issue 3-4 will be available in early December.

One comment

  1. Hi –

    I’m trying to access these articles and finding that many of them are still behind the paywall. Please make them available as stated.

    Thanks, Ben

    Dr Ben Spatz Senior Lecturer in Drama, Theatre and Performance School of Music, Humanities & Media University of Huddersfield b.spatz@hud.ac.uk

    Editor | Journal of Embodied Research | Open Library of Humanities Convener | Embodied Research Working Group | IFTR Author | What a Body Can Do (Routledge 2015) Artistic Director | Urban Research Theater

    >

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