Best of 2017

We’re always thrilled when our books are included on various Best of the Year lists. 2017 brought this honor to a number of great titles.

TitleTreatment_FINALThe New York Times named two of our books to their Best Art Books of 2017 list. Art critic Holland Cotter selected Kellie Jones’s South of Pico as one of his favorites. And critic Roberta Smith chose Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush, the catalog for Abney’s first solo museum exhibition at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.

South of Pico was also chosen as one of the year’s best booksSouth of Pico by Artforum. Gary Dauphin said the book was “a timely reminder that the United States has seen massive internal displacement within living memory and could again. But, more important, it’s also a credible affirmation that from such sudden, painful movements something new and whole might yet be made.” And in his list of 2017’s top ten moments of “reckoning and light,” Okwui Enwezor selected Stuart Hall’s Cultural Studies 1983. “Argumentative, diagnostic, witty, and learned,” he writes, “the series of scintillating lectures contained in this volume presents Hall at the height of his fearless and generous scholarly powers, offering not only a history of cultural studies but a theoretical and politically engaged reading of our unequal centuries.”

Culture Type also selected South of Pico as one of it’s Best Black Art Books of the year, calling it “both a scholarly triumph and a fascinating read.” Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush made their list, too, as did We Wanted a Revolution: A Sourcebook. A publication of the Brooklyn Museum, the Sourcebook accompanies their groundbreaking exhibition of the same name. Culture Type calls it “an invaluable reference.” Look for the second volume, We Wanted a Revolution: New Perspectives, next month.

Living a Feminist LifeLiving a Feminist Life by Sara Ahmed was named a best nonfiction book of 2017 by Entropy, and Autostraddle said it was one of the top ten queer feminist books of 2017. If you loved this book too, don’t forget to order your Feminist Killjoy t-shirt!

The Seminary Co-op bookstore named a number of Duke University Press titles to its Notable Books of 2017 list. Critique of Black Reason by Achille Mbembe made their Top 12 list as did We Wanted a Revolution, a sourcebook from the landmark exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. Other books on their list include Vinyl Freak by John Corbett and Isonomia and the Origins of Philosophy by Kojin Karatani.

Louise Thompson PattersonBitch Magazine included Louise Thompson Patterson: A Life of Struggle for Justice in their list of the best black women’s history books of the year. They write that author Keith Gilyard “offers a look at one of the most dynamic Black women who’s ever walked the Earth.”

Hunter College’s Center for Puerto Rican Studies puts Licia Fiol-Matta’s The Great Woman Singer on their Essential Boricua Reading List for the 2017 Holiday Season.

Just as we do at the end of every year, publisher Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux asked their staff to pick their favorite books of the year. Maya Binyam, who is also a Senior Editor at The New Inquiry, chose In the Wake by Christina Sharpe.

Congratulations to all these authors and thanks so much to those who spent time compiling the lists. You can save 30% on any of these titles by using coupon code SAVE30 at checkout on our website. Or buy them from your favorite local or online bookstore.

4 comments

  1. here we mention some of course as say prof dr mircea orasanu and prof horia orasanu as is followed
    LAGRANGIAN NONHOLONOMIC AND SCHWARZIAN FORMULA
    Author Horia Orasanu
    The analysis of Clairaut’s equation is slightly different from the general case, so we assume for our discussion that we do not have the Clairaut’s equation case. For the Clairaut’s equation case, see Clairaut’s equation.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s