New Books in June

We wrap up our Spring 2018 season with some great books this month.

978-0-8223-7152-6.jpgFrom Andean antiquity and Spanish colonialism to the present, the latest addition to our Latin America Readers series, The Bolivia Reader provides a panoramic view of Bolivia’s history, culture, and politics through a wide ranging collection of sources, most of which appear here in English for the first time.

Derek P. McCormack’s Atmospheric Things analyzes artistic, political, and technological uses of the balloon to show how its properties and capacities are central to understanding how we sense, perceive, and modify meteorological and affective atmospheres as well as the force of the atmosphere in modern life.

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First appearing in 1964, and long since out of print, Stuart Hall and Paddy Whannel’s landmark book The Popular Arts takes seriously the importance of studying popular culture, thereby opening up an almost unprecedented field of analysis of everything from film, pulp crime novels, and jazz to television and advertising. This edition also includes a new introduction by Richard Dyer, who contextualizes The Popular Arts within the history of cultural studies and outlines its impact and enduring legacy.

In What Does It Mean to Be Post-Soviet Madina Tlostanova traces how contemporary post-Soviet art mediates the post-Soviet human condition through analyses of art and through interviews with artists and writers, showing the important role that radical art plays in building new modes of thought and a decolonial future.

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Featuring 270 full color images, Victorian Jamaica, edited by Tim Barringer and Wayne Modest, explores the extraordinary archive of visual representation and material objects to provide a comprehensive and pluralistic account of Jamaican society during Queen Victoria’s reign, thereby expanding our understanding of the wider history of the British Empire and Atlantic world during this period.

In Posthumous Images Chad Elias analyzes a generation of artists working in Lebanon who interrogate Lebanon’s civil war (1975–1990), showing how their appropriation and creation of images challenge divisive political discourse, give a voice to those silenced and forgotten, and provide the means to reimagine Lebanon’s future.

 

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