Decline of the Republic

saq_118_1_coverThe most recent issue of the South Atlantic Quarterly, “Decline of the Republic: Vicissitudes of the Emerging Regime in Turkey,” edited by Ceren Özselçuk and Bülent Küçük, is available now.

“It is as if the rhythm of life in Turkey has sped up, like in time-lapse photography,” the editors write in their opening essay, made freely available. “The extraordinary series of events that have taken place within the last five years include bomb attacks, massacres, mass work accidents, wars and occupations, the Gezi Uprising and other large protests, corruption scandals, mass and targeted imprisonments, the coup attempt, purges, confiscation of institutional, corporate and individual properties, and finally the change from a parliamentary to a presidential regime.”

“What does the cumulative effect of these daily experiences of dislocation tell us about the nature of the social transformation that is taking place at the moment?” they write. “What the Turkish republic is ultimately grounded on is a persistent denial to encounter its constitutive ‘fault lines’ that shape its modern history.”

Contributors study the failed peace process between the Turkish State and the Kurdish movement, develop alternate frameworks for understanding Turkish authoritarianism, explore the restructuring of academia in Turkey and alternative spaces of education, and expose the limits of Erdoğan’s vision of “corporate sovereignty,” among other topics.

The issue also includes an “Against the Day” section entirely authored by students and academic staff involved in the #MustFall South African student movement calling for the decolonization of higher education. Contributors consider the matter of political time, from the use of the historically volatile term decolonization and the retrieval of political traditions from the 1960s to the stretching of time in occupations and campus shutdowns.

Browse the table of contents for “Decline of the Republic” and read the opening essay, freely available.

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