New Titles in Asian Studies

SPRING50_SaleApril20_Blog

Every year we look forward to connecting with scholars at the Association for Asian Studies conference. We will miss meeting with authors and editors and selling books at this year’s conference, which has been cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

We know that many of you look forward to stocking up on new books at special discounts at our conferences, so we are pleased to extend a 50% discount on all in-stock books and journal issues through May 1. In addition, if you spend $100 or more, we are offering free shipping to U.S. addresses. Journal subscriptions and society memberships don’t qualify for the 50% discount, but they do count toward the $100 threshold.

Here are some of the great titles in Asian Studies that we were planning to feature in our booth at AAS.

Experimental BeijingCongratulations to Sasha Su-Ling Welland, whose book Experimental Beijing: Gender and Globalization in Chinese Contemporary Art is the winner of the AAS’s 2020 Joseph Levenson Post-1900 Book Prize.

We also congratulate Juno Salazar Parreñas, whose book Decolonizing Extinction: The Work of Care in Orangutan Rehabilitation received honorable mention for the Harry J. Benda Prize, presented by the Southeast Asia Council (SEAC) of the AAS.

Margaret Hillenbrand’s Negative Exposures: Knowing What Not to Know in Contemporary China is new this month. She explores how artistic appropriations of historical images effectively articulate the openly unsayable and counter the public secrecy that erases traumatic episodes from China’s past.

Harry Harootunian is best known as a scholar of Japanese history, but recently he turned his pen to memoir, writing about his parents’ escape from the Armenian genocide in the early 20th century in The Unspoken as Heritage: The Armenian Genocide and Its Unaccounted Lives.

UnderglobalizationIn Underglobalization: Beijing’s Media Urbanism and the Chimera of Legitimacy, Joshua Neves examines the cultural politics of the “fake” and how frictions between legality and legitimacy propel dominant models of economic development and political life in contemporary China. See his recent blog post on the coronavirus.

In Invisibility by Design Women and Labor in Japan’s Digital Economy, Gabriella Lukács traces how young Japanese women’s unpaid labor as bloggers, net idols, “girly” photographers, online traders, and cell phone novelists was central to the development of Japan’s digital economy in the 1990s and 2000s.

Avian Reservoirs: Virus Hunters and Birdwatchers in Chinese Sentinel Posts by Frédéric Keck is unfortunately very timely right now. Keck Avian Reservoirstraces how the anticipation of bird flu pandemics has changed relations between birds and humans in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan, showing that humans’ reliance on birds is key to mitigating future pandemics. Check out his posts on the coronavirus’s impact in Wuhan in The Conversation and Somatosphere.

In his experimental work Ethnography #9, Alan Klima examines moneylending, gambling, funeral casinos, and the consultations of spirits and mediums to predict winning lottery numbers to illustrate the relationship between contemporary Thai spiritual and financial practices and global capitalism’s abstraction of monetary value.

Please check out all the titles we were planning on featuring in our program ad for the meeting. And see a complete list of our Asian Studies titles here.

EAS_new_prWe’re always excited to share our great Asian studies journals: Archives of Asian ArtComparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastEast Asian Science, Technology and Society, the Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture, the Journal of Korean Studies, positions: asia critique, and Prism: Theory and Modern Chinese Literature. Special issues are included in our 50%-off sale, and subscriptions are always available.

We also offer an Asian Studies e-book collection, which moves beyond traditional area studies to include titles addressing individual Asian countries as well as regional and transnational issues. Ask your librarian to learn more.

If you were hoping to connect with one of our editors about your book project at AAS, please reach out to them by email. See our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our submissions guidelines here.

Once again, we’re sorry to miss you in person but hope the 50% discount with free U.S. shipping on orders over $100 will make it possible for you to pick up some new books and journal issues. Use coupon SPRING50 at checkout and see the fine print on the sale here.

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