Three New Journal Partnerships for 2018

In 2018, Duke University Press will begin publishing three journals: the Journal of Korean Studies, English Language Notes, and Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism. Read on to learn more about these new journal partnerships.

ddjks_22_1The Journal of Korean Studies, edited by Theodore Hughes, is the preeminent journal in its field, publishing high-quality articles in all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences on a broad range of Korea-related topics, both historical and contemporary. Korean studies is a dynamic field, with student enrollments and tenure-track positions growing throughout North America and abroad. At the same time, the Korean peninsula’s increasing importance in the world has sparked interest in Korea well beyond those whose academic work focuses on the region. Recent topics include the history of anthropology of Korea; seventeenth century Korean love stories; the Chinese diaspora in North Korea; student activism in colonial Korea in the 1940s; and GLBTQ life in contemporary South Korea. Contributors include scholars conducting transnational work on the Asia-Pacific as well as on relevant topics throughout the global Korean diaspora. The Journal of Korean Studies is based at the Center for Korean Research at Columbia University.

ELN-54.2-cover-bleedA respected forum of criticism and scholarship in literary and cultural studies since 1962, English Language Notes (ELN) is dedicated to pushing the edge of scholarship in literature and related fields in new directions. Broadening its reach geographically and transhistorically, ELN opens new lines of inquiry and widens emerging fields. Each ELN issue advances topics of current scholarly concern, providing theoretical speculation as well as interdisciplinary recalibrations through practical usage. Offering semiannual, topically themed issues, ELN also includes “Of Note,” an ongoing section featuring related topics, review essays or roundtables of cutting-edge scholarship, and emergent concerns. Edited by Laura Winkiel, ELN is a wide-ranging journal that combines theoretical rigor with innovative interdisciplinary collaboration.

Meridians15Meridians, an interdisciplinary feminist journal, provides a forum for the finest scholarship and creative work by and about women of color in U.S. and international contexts. The journal, edited by Ginetta E. B. Candlario, engages the complexity of debates around feminism, race, and transnationalism in a dialogue across ethnic, national boundaries, and disciplinary boundaries. Meridians publishes work that makes scholarship, poetry, fiction, and memoir by and about women of color central to history, economics, politics, geography, class, sexuality, and culture. The journal provokes the critical interrogation of the terms used to shape activist agendas, theoretical paradigms, and political coalitions.

Visit dukeupress.edu/journals to subscribe to these journals.

Duke University Press to Bring James Baldwin’s Only Children’s Book Back Into Print

LittleManLittleManLittle Man, Little Man is the only children’s book by acclaimed writer James Baldwin. Published in 1976 by Dial Press, the book quickly went out of print. Now, at a time when Baldwin is more popular than ever, and readers, librarians, and booksellers are clamoring for more diverse children’s books, Duke University Press is proud to bring the book back into print. It will be available in August 2018.

In the book, four-year-old TJ spends his days on his lively Harlem block playing with his best friends WT and Blinky and running errands for neighbors. As he comes of age as a “Little Man” with big dreams, TJ faces a world of grown-up adventures and realities. Little Man, Little Man celebrates and explores the challenges and joys of black childhood. In it we not only see life in 1970s Harlem from a black child’s perspective; we gain a fuller appreciation of the genius of one of America’s greatest writers.

James Baldwin called Little Man, Little Man a “celebration of the self-esteem of black children.” In their brief introduction to the book, Baldwin scholars Nicholas Boggs and Jennifer DeVere Brody explain that the illustrations and text invite readers to “look again and experience the social ills represented in the book—violence, economic disparity, alcoholism and drug abuse, and the distortions of mass media—from the perspective of a black child, and one, it is important to note in closing, who is not innocent.” They suggest that audiences at the time were not ready for this perspective, which might explain the book’s initial reception.

Duke University Press’s new edition of Little Man, Little Man retains the charming original illustrations by French artist Yoran Cazac and includes a foreword by Baldwin’s nephew Tejan “TJ” Karefa-Smart (the inspiration for the title character) and an afterword by his niece Aisha Karefa-Smart.

Booksellers wanting more information or wishing to place an order for the book can contact Sales Manager Jennifer Schaper at jennifer.schaper@dukeupress.edu.

All other inquiries: Laura Sell, Publicity, lsell@dukeupress.edu or 919-687-3639.

Little Man, Little Man: A Story of Childhood
By James Baldwin. Illustrated by Yoran Cazac.
Edited and with an introduction by Nicholas Boggs and Jennifer DeVere Brody
With a foreword by Tejan Karefa and an afterword by Aisha Karefa-Smart
ISBN: 978-1-4780-0004-4
Hardcover, 128 pages, $22.95
Fully illustrated in color
August 2018

Trans Awareness Week: Resources from the Press

Trans Awareness Week, which leads up to the international Trans Day of Remembrance on November 19, is dedicated to transgender advocacy and awareness. We stand in solidarity with members of the trans community by sharing some of our most recent scholarship on trans studies.

readtorespondOur “Trans Rights” and “Bathroom Politics” reading lists include books and journal articles that address issues relevant to the trans community, from the recent bathroom ban to trans-inclusive feminism. The journal articles included in these lists are freely available through December 15, 2017, and book introductions are always freely available.

http://saq.dukejournals.org/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=blog%20post&utm_campaign=j-transawareness_Nov2017The essays in South Atlantic Quarterly’s “Against the Day” section “Unrecognizable: On Trans Recognition in 2017” confront urgent questions regarding transgender recognition in the current political moment. Since Trump was elected, trans communities in the United States have expressed fear and outrage at the possibility that the “transgender tipping point” might be about to tip back. However, contributors to these essays explore the complicated relationship of the trans community to the “transgender tipping point” and express that even if recognition is inevitable, trans people may not always want to be identified. These essays invent new terms to describe the impossibility and violence of recognition and speculatively suggest an entirely different relation to visibility. In relation to the backlash, too, they argue that we cannot do trans politics without an analysis of political economy, of the history of racialization and the violence of liberalism, and of hetero- and gender normativity.

978-0-8223-6914-1Developed in the United States in the 1980s, facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of bone and soft tissue reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of trans- women. In The Look of a Woman Eric Plemons foregrounds the narratives of FFS patients and their surgeons as they move from consultation and the operating room to postsurgery recovery. He shows how the increasing popularity of FFS represents a shift away from genital-based conceptions of trans- selfhood in ways that mirror the evolving views of what is considered to be good trans- medicine.

 

FORTHCOMING FROM TSQ: TRANSGENDER STUDIES QUARTERLY

ddtsq_4_3_4_coverTranspsychoanalysis
edited by Sheila L. Cavanagh

While psychoanalysis has traditionally been at odds with transgender issues, a growing body of revisionist psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice has begun to tease out the trans-affirming potential of the field. “Transpsychoanalysis,” features essays that highlight this potential by simultaneously critiquing and working within the boundaries of psychoanalytic concepts and theories guiding clinical work. Featuring a range of clinicians and scholars, this issue centers on questions pertaining to trans experience, desire, difference, otherness, identification, loss, mourning, and embodiment. The contributors explore these questions through topics like Tiresian mythology, bathroom bans, ethics, popular culture, and the Freudian couch. By setting up this dialogue between psychosocial studies and trans cultural studies, this revisionist work may radically transform psychoanalytic theory and practice.

“Transpsychoanalysis,” volume 4, issue 3-4 will be available in early December.

American Studies Association, 2017

We had a great time meeting authors and editors and selling books and journals at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Studies Association in Chicago this weekend.

Saldana PortilloA huge congratulations to María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo whose book Indian Given: Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States won the 2017 John Hope Franklin prize honoring the most outstanding book published in American Studies in 2016.

chris in tshirtWe were excited to sell our very first t-shirts at the meeting. Look for Feminist Killjoy and TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly shirts for sale on our website soon if you missed them at the meeting. We’ll also have them for sale at several other fall conferences.

As always, we enjoyed having authors and editors pose with their publications in the booth.

 


If you missed the conference, or if your favorite title sold out before you could buy it, don’t despair, you can still order them from our website for 30% off with coupon code ASA17.

“Thank You for Your Service”

On the day before Veterans Day, Grateful Nation author Ellen Moore offers commentary on a phrase many of us take for granted.

ellen-6470As many of us take the day off work for Veterans Day, we pause to honor former military members and often resort to the familiar phrase “Thank you for your service.”  Yet the simple gesture of thanking soldiers for their service is not so simple.

In the years since 9/11 and the onset of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, “thank you for your service” has become a ritualized phrase that is repeated in airports, schools, shopping centers, and movie theaters. On college campuses, for example, veteran support meetings routinely begin with civilian speakers thanking the student veterans for their service. When I began my research with veterans attending college, civilians working for the U.S. Army advised that I should introduce myself to veterans by thanking them for their service because it would facilitate communication. Because the phrase was so ubiquitous, instead of repeating it, I chose to ask veterans to describe how they feel when they hear the phrase “thank you for your service.” I got a range of answers from appreciation to active dislike, but many said that the phrase, coming from strangers who knew nothing about them beside their military status, seemed like a platitude; it seemed like something civilians thought they were supposed to say. Others were concerned that the phrase served as a way to avoid deeper discussions about the wars and about the effects on soldiers who are sent to fight them. As Jordan, a former Marine and veteran of the Iraq War told me: “For me the biggest problem is that the people of this country don’t understand what they’re asking [when they send soldiers into war]. They don’t understand what we’re doing. They want to be appreciative. They want to understand. I really believe that. They want to be thankful. They want to be supportive. But all of these things require being informed, being knowledgeable and not burying our heads in the sand when we get to the ugly truth.”

978-0-8223-6909-7For Jordan the “ugly truth” involved sending young men and women into battle to harm or kill unknown others for reasons not always clear to them. Many suffer from what is now called moral injury resulting from having to carry out actions that conflict with their moral beliefs. During the three years I spent in and around veteran communities researching their experiences on college campuses, I found that when civilians, soldiers, or veterans criticized military policies or actions they were often labeled as not just anti-war, but anti-military or even anti-veteran.  But my research found that dichotomous “pro or anti-war” labels cannot adequately describe diverse beliefs held by military members, veterans, and civilians about the military and the contemporary wars.

Daily life today in the United States is marked by a heightened sense of vulnerability and anxiety about national security. We are warned that enemies at home and abroad threaten U.S. jobs, families, and homes. This national insecurity problem has come with a built-in solution: militarized interventions in the form of expanded and instrumental use of deadly force by police, walled-off militarized border zones, drone warfare, and threats of nuclear strikes. Paradoxically, the heightened rhetoric of war is accompanied by a societal silence about the effects of war on soldiers as both victims and perpetrators of violence.

But we must talk about this—and veterans have a lot to say.

War veterans’ complex positions are often informed by what they call the “ground truth”– the lived reality of combat and military occupation. When someone knows this “ground truth”, they cannot reduce that experience to a simplistic choice between being a hero or a villain. However, in our efforts to honor veterans’ service, we can end up idealizing both war and warrior.

News stories and commercial ad campaigns featuring uniformed soldiers highlight heroism, loyalty to country, and sacrifice, but there are few public representations of the ambivalence and conflict that so many veterans shared with me. I found that some student veterans wanted to be acknowledged for their service while others just wanted to blend in on campus and be seen as ordinary students. Some veterans wanted to engage in conversations about the wars with civilian students, while others wanted to avoid discussions they feared would lead to unwelcome interrogations. This diversity highlights the need for more complex and targeted supports for student veterans. We must provide room for conversations involving political difference on college campuses and in veteran support settings.

We can honor military veterans by engaging in difficult conversations about war and peace, consent and dissent, social conformity and social difference, and about what it takes for a nation to be secure. Yet finding common ground across diverse worldviews is difficult since we live in a highly polarized ideological environment that seeps into discussions about military veterans and the current wars.

“Thank you for your service” and other societal conventions that require veterans and civilians to adopt an uncomplicated view of military service and the wars inhibit discussions that some veterans want and need for their own benefit and for the benefit of their fellow veterans. As I conducted the research for my book, I found that for many veterans, enforced silences and heroic narratives about the wars increased cognitive and emotional dissonance between their lived military experience and their return to civilian society.

Jordan and his fellow veterans deserve more than ritualized phrases, they deserve to be listened to and to have their experience understood. We can and should differentiate between support for veterans and support for the wars in which they fought.

Ellen Moore’s Grateful Nation: Student Veterans and the Rise of the Military-Friendly Campus is out now. Pick up the paperback for 30% off using coupon code E17MOORE on our website.
Supporting thoughtful, deeply researched scholarship like Moore’s is what University Press Week is all about. The final day of University Press Week’s blog tour theme is Libraries and Librarians Helping Us All #LookItUP. University of Missouri Press provides a look into the ways the Special Collections archive and certain librarians helped both the press and the author with Lanford Wilson: Early Stories, Sketches, Poems. At University of Nebraska Press, director of Lincoln City Libraries, Pat Leach, will contribute a post. Next, the University Press of Florida will spotlight the Florida and the Caribbean Open Books Series, a collaboration between the press and and the UF George A. Smathers Libraries. An entry from University of Georgia Press demonstrates how libraries serve as bastions of facts and real information against the onslaught of Fake News.  University of Alabama Press  will also have a post. Read and share with the hashtags #ReadUP and #LookItUP and keep talking about the great work university presses do even after this week ends.

University Press Week: #Twitterstorm

upw-banner-2017_web

 

Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is #TwitterStorm, featuring posts about how authors and university presses use social media to spread their messages. Check out the video above to see our author Lynn Comella discuss how she considers social media a form of activism. Then head over to Harvard University Press to get a look at how social media has played a role in the publication of Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide. Next, Greg Britton, Editorial Director of Johns Hopkins University Press, extols the virtues of Twitter. Athabasca University Press showcases how they utilized social media channels to create a citywide book club. Finally, a post from Beacon Press demonstrates how social media has helped advertise and keep conversation going about Christopher Edmin’s For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too.

Come back tomorrow for a great Veterans Day post from us and more from the University Press Week blog tour. And keep sharing your love for university presses on social media with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

University Press Week: Producing the Books that Matter

upw-banner-2017_web

Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is Producing the Books that Matter. Visit University of Kansas Press to learn about how editorial and production departments work together to create books. Then head to University of Michigan Press for an interview with Jay Timothy Dolmage, author of their upcoming book Academic Ableism. David Goodwin will talk about the production of his book Left Bank of the Hudson, which was published this Fall by Fordham University Press. At University of Washington Press, their press director and president of the AAUP, Nicole Mitchell, will write about the value of university presses. Yale University Press will be featuring an episode of their podcast on the making of the Voynich Manuscript. UBC Press offers a post on the challenges and rewards of working closely with an author to develop a book for a general rather than a scholarly audience. University of California Press and Georgetown University Press are also participating.

Check back here tomorrow for more great blog posts and don’t forget to share your love for university presses online with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

Selling the Facts: Sales Manager Jennifer Schaper Reports from the Frankfurt Book Fair

upw-banner-2017_web

Schaper-Jennifer-169x300Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour! Today’s theme is Selling the Facts, and features posts about booksellers and book selling in today’s challenging political climate. Today’s post is by our Sales Manager Jennifer Schaper. Schaper has over ten years of experience in book publishing. Before coming to Duke University Press, she was the International Rights Manager at the Perseus Books Group.

Visiting the 2017 Frankfurt book fair this October was a unique opportunity to sample the bookselling climate in the age of Trump. Of course, the US wasn’t the only nation to experience political upheaval on a nearly-surreal level—there was a consensus that during the US election, the Brexit vote and France’s election, as well as several other nations facing pivotal national decisions, book sales were dipping. The theory is that everyone was glued to, and bingeing on, media coverage of the state of their home countries and the world. After the results were in and the dust settled, people had a chance to absorb and process the outcomes, and then slowly but surely returned to the solid, non-fake news world of nonfiction to figure out what happened, to piece together why and to figure out what to do about it.

frankfurt 1The general book fair atmosphere was somber, and it was not a year for taking publishing risks for the larger, non-university publishers. It felt reminiscent of the 2008 book fair post-market crash, when publishers felt uncertain of the financial and political future, and their publishing programs reflected a fiscally cautious approach, returning to safe mainstays.

But as this new normal sets in, there seems to be a renewed interest in nonfiction as an antidote to fake news. Particularly concerning politics and philosophy, readers are hungry for well-researched, trustworthy sources of information and informed opinion. People are attending activist author events and readings and sales at left-leaning bookstores are strong. Activist, feminist bookstore Bluestockings in New York City is near the top of Duke University Press’s bestselling booksellers list. There is also a return to interest in classic philosophy and political thought as the current state of things seems muddled, unpredictable, and in danger of falling apart. Perhaps readers are looking for comfort: something solid and intelligent to revisit or reconsider.

frankfurt 2In these dystopian-like times, when reality is disorienting, readers are looking for wisdom and reassurance, rediscovering political and philosophical works and searching for real, educated guidance in current non-fiction, to make their way through a sea of fake news and political turmoil. Politically engaged, deeply informed nonfiction publishing is more important than ever and remains a source of knowledge and inspiration to inspire informed conversation and action.

The blog tour continues at the University of Minnesota Press, where they interview a few of their favorite booksellers. The University of Hawai’i Press offers a round-up of interesting, peer-reviewed facts published by their journals. At Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore indie bookstore The Ivy Bookshop writes about selling in the Age of Trump and working with JHUP. Columbia University Press offers a post by Conor Broughan, Northeast Sales Representative for the Columbia University Press Sales Consortium, discussing making sales calls during the 2016 presidential campaign. University Press of Kentucky features a guest post by UK Libraries exploring the societal benefits in university presses continuing to publish and readers continuing to have access to well-researched, low-controversy, long-form published content in an age of distraction, manufactured outrage, and hyper partisanship. University of Toronto Press has a post on the day in the life of a Canadian higher education sales rep, selling books on US campuses. And University of Texas Press also has a post.

Check back here tomorrow for more on the University Press Week blog tour. Don’t forget to use the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP!

 

University Press Week 2017: Knowledge Matters

upw-banner-2017_web

It’s University Press Week! University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society. We’ll be celebrating with displays at the Durham County Library‘s South Regional branch, the Hayti Heritage Center, North Carolina Central University library, and around Duke University’s campus at the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Music Library, the Office for Faculty Advancement, the John Hope Franklin Center, the Nicholas School of the Environment, and the Center for Multicultural Affairs. If you’re in Durham please stop by and check out some of our recent titles and pick up a free bookmark, pen, or magnet.

This year’s University Press Week Theme is #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters. In today’s political climate—where “fake news” and “alternate facts” are believed by so many people—valuing expertise and knowledge can feel like a radical act. University presses not only believe in facts and knowledge, but traffic in them daily, publishing approximately 14,000 books and more than 1,100 journals each year, read by people around the globe.

We launched our “Read to Respond” series to highlight some of our own groundbreaking scholarship that engages with today’s pressing issues. Each topic, from student activism to racial justice, is highlighted with a reading list that encourages students and teachers alike to join the conversation surrounding these current events. Check out your favorite “Read to Respond” topics below and share these resources in and out of the classroom. These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017.

We now encourage you to learn more about the important work of university presses by checking out the week-long blog tour. Each day has a different theme and will feature posts by five-ten different presses. Today’s theme is Scholarship Making a Difference. Begin at Temple University Press for a post on scholarship on racism and whiteness. Then head to Wayne State University Press to read about their upcoming book on slavery in 21st-century America. University Press of Colorado has a feature on their post-truth focused titles. At Princeton University Press, Al Bertrand writes on the importance of non-partisan peer reviewed social science in today’s political climate. George Mason University Press offers a post on the path to discovery of an overlooked and misunderstood yet influential historical figure, William Playfair. At University of Toronto Press, their history editor in higher education discusses the importance of making scholarship accessible to students and the role of publishers in helping to build better citizens. Wilfrid Laurier University Press offers a roundup of their Indigenous scholarship with commentary from the series editor about its importance. Oregon State University Press  Finally, stop at Cambridge University Press to see their post.

Check back here each day to see the stops on the blog tour and our own University Press Week posts. Don’t forget to share with the hashtags #ReadUP and #LookItUP!

Borders and Margins

ddmew_13_3_coverThe most recent special issue of Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, “Borders and Margins,” is now available.

This issue approaches borders and margins through the lens of gender and sexuality.  Borders and margins are productive spaces to examine both the power and contingency of normative gender and sexual ideals and how gendered and sexual bodies participate in the production and reconfiguration of the nation-state. Essays in this issue analyze how women on the margins of society expose the exclusionary and gendered logics of nation-state formation and then generate new engagements with embodied politics and religious practice. This examination of borders and margins continues the feminist and gender-based analyses of material and discursive spaces and mobilities examined in previous issues.

The issue also features a special forum on Trump’s Presidency and Middle East Women’s Studies, examining topics such as the Muslim ban and the gendered side of Islamophobia. This special forum is freely available until May 2018.

Start reading with Sara Smith’s preface to the issue, freely available now.