Author: Duke University Press

Duke University Press Signs French National License Agreement with ISTEX

istex.pngDuke University Press has signed a major agreement with ISTEX, a French national licensing program, to make the Duke Mathematical Journal (DMJ) available to French research institutions.

With this agreement, 112 volumes of content from DMJ are made available to millions of users at over 330 French universities, grande écoles, research institutes, and libraries. Published by Duke University Press since its inception in 1935, DMJ is one of the world’s leading mathematical journals. DMJ emphasizes the most active and influential areas of current mathematics and has several distinguished French mathematicians on its editorial board. The journal has published work by the Fields Medalists Cédric Villani, Ngô Bảo Châu, Jean-Pierre Serre, and Artur Avila.

Since 2012, ISTEX has facilitated the massive acquisition of archives of scientific and mathematical production in all disciplines made available to public institutions of higher education and research in France on one central platform.

David Aymonin, Head of the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education, says, “All the four partners leading ISTEX are happy to add quality mathematics content from the Duke Mathematical Journal to the ISTEX initiative through our arrangement with Duke University Press. We see this partnership as bringing important mathematics scholarship to more researchers throughout France.”

“The Press is delighted to have the opportunity to participate in the ISTEX project by offering content from the Duke Mathematical Journal, including eminent French scholars, for use by mathematicians throughout France. We are grateful to TSP Diffusion for their support,” says Cason Lynley, Director of Marketing and Sales at Duke University Press.

DMJ content is available to ISTEX institutions on the Project Euclid platform. Read the full announcement.

Read to Respond: Racial Justice

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on racial justice, diving deep into topics such as racial identity, the Ferguson trial, and black activism. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Racial Justice

 

 

 

Poetry and Poetics

ddbou_44_3Poetry and Poetics,” the most recent special issue of boundary 2 (44:3), emerges from a series of conferences with special emphasis on the topic of “The Social Life of Poetic Language.” This issue stresses that academic theorizing misrepresents the function and nature of poetry. It explores a range of diverse methods and topics instead to redirect contemporary theories and criticisms of poetry and poetics. 

Topics in this special issue include lengthy engagements with translation, the poetic in the social world, the new formal imperatives of poetry, and the relation between human and animal over the threshold of word and body. The contributors—Charles Bernstein, Colin Dayan, Stathis Gourgouris, and Dawn Lundy Martin—consider the issues of contemporary poetry from the long perspective of active poetics, a post-Romantic notion with origins in the long 18th century.  They show the need for a critical historical practice that understands and promotes the transformative action of poetics.

Dig into the issue now with “Too Philosophical for a Poet”: A Conversation with Charles Bernstein” by Andrew David King, made freely available.

Read to Respond: Labor

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on labor, worker’s rights, and neoliberalism. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Labor

These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

 

Summer Vacation Reading Recommendations from our Staff

Our staff are voracious readers, including while they’re on vacation. There they can take a break from manuscripts and delve into something a little bit more fun. If you’re off to the beach or the mountains or somewhere in between on this coming long weekend, take time to stop off at a bookstore on your way and stock up on some of these recommended titles.

inthewoods_usJournals Marketing Manager, Jocelyn Dawson: Last year’s vacation reads recommendation from Elizabeth Ault, Assistant Editor, turned me on to the work of Tana French. She’s published six books to date—highly suspenseful psychological thrillers that are impossible to put down. But I can only recommend the first three (In the Woods, The Likeness, and Faithful Place)—I’m trying to spread the others out. The books are connected but not exactly sequential; still, I’d recommend starting from the beginning. Elizabeth’s recommendation has led to many enthralled reading hours for me and for at least three other people I’ve shared the books with.

joe ideSenior Managing Editor, Charles Brower: IQ, by Joe Ide. It’s a thriller about Isaiah Quintabe, a very appealing “underground” detective who’s equal parts Sherlock Holmes and Easy Rawlins; he’s trying to atone for some past mistakes by helping out his Long Beach neighbors, for whatever they can afford to pay him, even if it’s just a home-cooked meal. When he agrees to investigate a murder attempt on a paranoid rap star, he has to match wits with a hit man whose weapon of choice is a monstrous killer dog. It’s hair-raising and also very funny. Ide has another IQ novel coming out this fall, and I can’t wait to devour it!

drums of autumn.jpgBooks Publicity and Advertising Manager, Laura Sell: I’m a little late to the “Outlander” game, but if you like romance, history, time travel, and men in kilts, I can thoroughly recommend the series. The books are huge, over 700 pages, and totally immersive, which makes a perfect vacation book for me. I’ve been watching the TV series, too, but the books are much better. I’m taking Book 4, Drums of Autumn, which is set partly in colonial North Carolina, on my vacation to Maine this year and am looking forward to many pleasant hours on the porch with it.

game of thronesManaging Editor of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Michael Cornett: George R. R. Martin, A Game of Thrones, vol. 1 of the series “A Song of Ice and Fire,” otherwise known as the “Game of Thrones” series. While many have enjoyed the popular television series, the novels are far far better. As an academic medievalist and a devout lover of Tolkien’s writing, I had serious doubts about reading this, figuring it would be pulpy fantasy fiction imitative of Tolkien (have you noticed the R. R. middle initials?). I gave it a try and I have become utterly absorbed. Martin’s beautifully written narrative is not at all like Tolkien’s mythological tale of good and evil. It is rather an imaginative blend of historical-psychological realism and medievalistic fantasy. The chapters are told from various characters’ points of view—half of them female characters, many of them children. Everyone is in peril as the world convulses from factional struggles for power, and the reader—who can too easily imagine every scene—turns the pages madly hoping for order to be established. An apocalyptic winter is coming, the characters brood, but summer is the perfect time to start into this rewarding series of novels.

Everything,_EverythingJournals Marketing Intern, Camille Wright: I recommend Nicola Yoon’s Everything, Everything. Through this novel, the readers are able to experience the world from fresh perspective. Maddy was diagnosed with SCID (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency) as an infant and has been unable to leave her home since. After a mysterious boy named Oli and his family move across the street, the eighteen-year-old risks everything to find herself, the meaning of love and the difference between being alive and living. The novel brings a new excitement to the activities people take for granted because they are experienced in normal, daily life.

In The Company of WomenJournals Publicist and Exhibits Coordinator, Katie Smart: Grace Bonney’s edited collection In the Company of Women: Inspiration and Advice from over 100 Makers, Artists, and Entrepreneurs isn’t a traditional vacation read (its hardcover form weighs three pounds!), but the content and images are so beautiful you’ll want to lug this book around with you all summer. This collection features interviews with creative and diverse women—furniture makers, graphic designers, comedians, tattoo artists, fashion designers, the list goes on—that include questions like “What did you want to be when you were a child?;” “What would you tell yourself ten to twenty years ago that you wish you knew then?;” and “In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you build yourself back up?” Alongside the Q&As, the book features exquisite photography that highlights the work spaces where these women chose to be most creative. I challenge you not to be motivated to tap into your own creative genius after finishing this book!Ivory+HC

Digital Access and Books Specialist, Rebecca Hambleton:  Ivory and Bone by Julie Eshbaugh. This is a YA book with similar themes as Pride and Prejudice. What makes this book interesting and unique is that it’s set in prehistoric times and follows a boy and his family who are desperate to make alliances with other clans through marriage.

What vacation reads would you recommend? Let us know in the comments!

Read to Respond: Migration Studies

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on immigration in commemoration with World Refugee Day, an international movement that supports families forced to flee and honors the strength, courage and perseverance of millions of refugees. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Migration Studies

These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

 

Curating Crisis

ddthe_47_2The most recent issue of Theater, “Curating Crisis,” is the journal’s second issue devoted to the curation of performance. It includes an additional set of interviews with four leading performance curatorsFlorian Malzacher, Sodja Lotker, Miranda Wright, and Boris Charmatzthat continue the conversation of historical precedents for curators specializing in theater, dance, and other live forms. It examines the ways in which performance curators are responding to crises and conflicts both within the fields of performance, and in the spheres of politics, economics, and history.

A special section features a series of essays based on lectures originally presented in SpielART festival’s 2015 convening, “Show Me the World,” in which contributors ask how curation strategies might acknowledge and build from postcolonial contexts. The section introduces major questions provoked by rethinking the role of the curator in a time of increasingly transcultural exchange and exhibition.

“Curating Crisis” includes articles on topics such as:

  • Multiculturalism
  • Black American Performance Artistry
  • Performance Curation
  • Micropolitics
  • Performance History

and much more.

Browse the table-of-contents and read the introduction made freely available. To learn more about the topic, read “Performance Curators,” Theater’s first issue devoted to performance curation.

Symposium on the Contributions of Business to Economics

ddhope_49_2In the most recent issue of History of Political Economy, “Symposium on the Contributions of Business to Economics,” edited by Robert Van Horn and Edward Nik-khah, contributors examine how business has influenced economic policy, how businesses have actively participated in constructing economic doctrines, and how businesspersons used, engaged with, challenged, and steered economists in economic policy.

The issue focuses on the contributions of business to economics and brings together contributors from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Editors and contributors examine the historiographical challenges of determining who is an economist and who is a businessperson. These essays shed light on how the relationship between business and economics has evolved and suggest directions for future historical work.

“Symposium of the Contributions of Business to Economics” includes articles on topics such as:

  • mercantilism
  • political economy
  • epistemology
  • international trade
  • business consulting
  • science and democracy

and much more.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, made freely available.

Read to Respond: Queer Studies

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on queer studies in celebration of Pride Month and yesterday’s Equality March for Unity & Pride. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Queer Studies

These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

 

 

 

The Issue of Blackness

ddtsq_4_2_coverThe most recent special issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, “The Issue of Blackness,” edited by Treva Ellison, Kai M. Green, Matt Richardson, and C. Riley Snorton, is available now.

This issue explores and questions the issuance of Blackness to transgender identity, politics, and transgender studies. These editors offer blunt provocations to the field of transgender studies and its practitioners, asking why, in its processes of institutionalization and canon formation, has transgender studies been so remiss in acknowledging women-of-color feminisms—black feminisms in particular—as a necessary foundation for the field’s own critical explorations of embodied difference.  In asking this question, these essays also wrestle with the relationship between trans* studies and queer studies through the lens of blackness. While trans* studies has often held queer studies accountable for its cis-centrism, a field of black queer studies has taken shape that provides an intellectual home for black scholars of trans* phenomena that such scholars have yet to fully claim within trans* studies.

Read the full introduction to the issue by Susan Stryker and Paisley Currah, made freely available.