Author: Duke University Press

Patriarchy, Protection, and Women’s Agency in Modern France: Essays in Honor of Rachel G. Fuchs

The newest special issue of French Historical Studies honors the memory of Rachel G. Fuchs, a French women’s history scholar and former editor of the journal.

Patriarchy, Protection, and Women’s Agency in Modern France: Essays in Honor of Rachel G. Fuchs,” edited by Elinor Accampo and Venita Datta, pays tribute to Fuchs’s research, which addressed feminist themes central to nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France, such as evolving forms of male power expressed through paternity, the victimization of women and children resulting from industrial capitalism and male abuse of power, and the development of mechanisms to protect the abused through surveillance of potential victims.

Contributors to the issue also extend beyond Fuchs’s work by addressing previously unexplored topics, including imagining society without property and paternity rights, child sexual abuse, workshops run by nuns, Christian feminism’s critique of patriarchy, and “trafficked women” as migrant workers.

Browse the issue’s contents here, or read the introduction, freely available.

Critique and Cosmos: After Masao Miyoshi

Contributors to the newest issue of boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture explore the works of Masao Miyoshi, who introduced the concept of “aftering” — the act of prolonging and transforming impacts across cultural, political, and disciplinary borders.

Critique and Cosmos: After Masao Miyoshi,” edited by Rob Wilson and Paul A. Bové, is a reflection of Miyoshi’s concept and a tribute to the scholar himself, as illustrated in Harry Harootunian’s essay “As We Saw Him: Masao Miyoshi and the Vocation of Critical Struggle,” available free for three months.

The remaining essays offer fresh takes on several of his critical visions, including a humility of our knowledge system and the quest to exceed it, relearning the sense of the world in which we live, the practice of “anti-photography,” and the need for humanistic disciplines to address the global commons created by runaway consumption and environmental deterioration.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.

“Emotion and Visuality in Chinese Literature and Culture”

“Emotion or qing 情 has been identified at the core of Chinese thinking about literature, such that ‘lyrical tradition’ becomes an encompassing concept for many to distinguish Chinese literary tradition from its Western counterpart,” write the editors of the newest Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture issue in their introduction, freely available

“Emotion and Visuality in Chinese Literature and Culture” explores topics such as the presence of emotion in medieval Chinese burials; image-text relationships of gendered emotions, such as is depicted in the “hundred beauties” (baimei 百美) genre of the late Ming and Qing dynasties; and the affective experience of Chinese culture, as evidenced in the works of Chinese artists Chen Hongshou, Qiu Canzhi, and Yuan Kewen.

Browse the table of contents, read the introduction, and sign up for email alerts to not miss an issue.

Celebrating the People of Duke University Press

This week, members of the Association of University Presses honor our late colleague Mark Saunders, director of the University of Virginia Press, with a blog tour recognizing the people who make up our university press community. We asked our colleagues at Duke University Press to tell us what they appreciate about the people they work alongside.

“I spent a week-in-residence over a decade ago in the production department at the University of California Press. During that week I was overwhelmed by the generosity of Tony Crouch and Marilyn Schwartz, and the lengths to which they went to make sure I met as many people as possible and had access to whatever information they had that might help me and my department back home at Duke. I think that week was when I truly learned what university press publishing is all about: sharing ideas and resources freely with colleagues, both at home and around the country and world; struggling together with new technologies, new ways of doing business, new problems thrown at us by the likes of Amazon; and forming lasting friendships through annual meetings, committee work, listserv interactions, and even Twitter. Duke University Press is the house I live my work life in, its staff is my family, and my AUPresses colleagues are my virtual community.” —Patty Chase, Digital Content Manager

“I’ve worked at Duke University Press for 14 years—longer than I’ve lived at any one address. My colleagues and I know each others’ footsteps, tea preferences, and pet peeves. We’ve weathered tough projects and stressful times, and have greater trust and respect for each other as a result. Candidates often ask what we like about the Press and the answer is always the people. It feels trite but it’s true.” —Jocelyn Dawson, Journals Marketing Manager

“I’ve worked at Duke University Press for almost two years after several positions in the library services industry. Being new to the publishing side, I appreciate that my veteran colleagues are committed to providing resources that help all of us succeed. We celebrate each others’ accomplishments, whether big or small, as a team.” —Katja Moos, Digital Collections Sales Manager

“A visiting editor once asked our sales team what incentive they had to make sales if they didn’t get bonuses or commission. A few of us almost laughed because to us it was so obvious—the incentive is the mission and the fact that we want the Press to thrive and continue contributing to the scholarly dialogue. That’s what makes working for a UP special; the people who come and stay at places like Duke University Press believe in that mission and put their hearts into it. Even after 19 years at the Press, I am impressed on a daily basis with the dedication, creativity, intelligence, and humor of the people with whom I work.” —Cason Lynley, Director of Marketing and Sales

“My colleagues at Duke University Press are dedicated, smart, and creative, and I could write tributes to each of them. One person stands out as a star example of everything that is great about university press staff. Our Title Management [publishing software] Product Manager Ashley Postlethwaite never ceases to amaze me with her ingenuity, efficiency, deep knowledge, and eagerness to solve problems. I have come to believe there is no Title Management error she cannot troubleshoot, no report she cannot improve on, and no workflow she cannot make more efficient with a few under-the-hood tweaks. I’m also really impressed that with Title Management working generally smoothly for much of the organization, Ashley is not resting on her laurels, but instead going to various staff members to conduct audits of all the work we do in the system so that she can help us make it even better. Thank you, Ashley, for all you do!” —Laura Sell, Publicity and Advertising Manager

We are fortunate to work with a large number of dedicated and thoughtful individuals, and we hope that you feel the influence of their care as you read our books and journals.

Health and Political Participation

The newest issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, “Health and Political Participation,” is now freely available online for three months.

Contributors analyze the potential of health policy to affect the public’s health and political engagement, covering topics that include whether participation in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) differs by political partisanship, the potential mechanisms behind low voter turnout for Americans with disabilities, and the political determinants of health in the least healthy place in America, the Mississippi Delta.

Read the full issue, freely available for three months.

The Politics of Boycotts

The Politics of Boycotts,” the newest issue of Radical History Review, edited by E. Natalie Rothman and Andrew Zimmerman, is now available.

“Boycotts exercise the one power that no state, no corporation, no military can prevent,” write the editors in their introduction, available free. “That is the power not to: not to buy from, not to work with or for. … It is a power of nonrecognition.”

Contributors to this special issue explore the global, entangled history of boycotts, from the original Captain Boycott of the Irish Land War and the Canadian opposition of apartheid in South Africa to the consumer activism movement against Coors beer in the late 20th century and queer engagement in the World Social Forum: Free Palestine.

Digital Methods and Traditional Chinese Literary Studies

JCL_5-2_coverIn the newest issue of the Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture, contributors explore how the digital humanities have revolutionized the study of classical Chinese literature. Edited by Jing Chen, Thomas J. Mazanec, and Jeffrey R. Tharsen, the issue depicts how modern technologies can enhance traditional philology and literary studies.

Methods discussed include computational analysis of Tang dynasty poems, using Gephi software to compare Ming dynasty anthologies, and creating network diagrams from ancient Chinese annotations.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.

Top Ten Most Read Articles From HAHR

HAHR_picThis spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history.

HAHR publishes vital work across thematic, chronological, regional, and methodological specializations, with articles featuring original, innovative research and path-breaking analysis.

Interested in reading more? Here are the top ten most frequently read articles from HAHR from the past year, freely available through August:

Want to keep up to date on the latest cutting-edge articles from HAHR? Sign up for email alerts when new issues are published.

Learn more about the journal in “Celebrating 100 Years of the Hispanic American Historical Review,” produced last year in honor of HAHR’s centennial:

Interrogating “Diversity”

pcl_31_2_coverThe newest issue of Public Culture, “Interrogating ‘Diversity,’” edited by Damani J. Partridge and Matthew Chin, is available now.

Since the 1970s, the global practice of diversity has sparked a number of inclusion initiatives, such as affirmative action in universities, implemented to redress historical inequality. Contributors to this special issue argue that, in recent years, these initiatives have shifted away from their original intent toward a concept of “diversity” in which inclusion systematically denies access to minoritized populations.

“At elite institutions and in high-paying jobs in various global contexts, diversity has come to mean a sprinkling of color or the contingent presence of the ‘disadvantaged’ in otherwise majoritarian ‘White’ or upper-class/high-caste institutions,” write the editors in their introduction.

“Our call to interrogate diversity has also led us to collectively think beyond, outside, and in spite of diversity,” the editors continue. “It is not that we are against inclusion, but we cannot justify forms of inclusion that necessarily (even systematically) limit access. This includes forms that do very little to create possibilities for those who have systematically faced barriers that deny entrance. Interrogating diversity cannot mean sustaining existing institutions as we already know them. This process must be engaged in an activist, collective, and participatory project of social transformation.”

Read the introduction, freely available, or browse the table of contents.

Resilience in the Age of Austerity

ped_19_2_coverThe newest issue of Pedagogy, “Resilience in the Age of Austerity,” edited by Chris W. Gallagher, Deborah Minter, and Shari J. Stenberg, is available now.

Contributors to this special issue consider what resilience means to academia in an age of economic austerity. Exploring resilience as a social, rhetorical practice rather than an individual attribute, the authors offer examples of how particular austerity measures enacted on their campuses―from community colleges to private universities―impact teachers’ and students’ work.

Through their diverse articles, the authors argue that teachers and scholars of literature, language, writing, and culture can and should make major contributions to interdisciplinary understandings of resilience.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.