Author: Jessica Castro-Rappl

Scenes of Suffering

Contributors to “Scenes of Suffering,” out now from Theater, explore representations of pain, suffering, and trauma in contemporary American theater and performance. All articles are freely available for 3 months: read them here.

Topics include:

and more. Browse the table of contents, and be sure to sign up for email alerts so you don’t miss an issue.

Duke University Press Joins the NC LIVE HomeGrown Collection

Duke University Press and NC LIVE have partnered to add thirty of the Press’s e-books to the NC LIVE HomeGrown Collection, making them freely available to more than 200 libraries across the state with unlimited, simultaneous use: no holds, checkout limits, or waitlists.

Titles include bestsellers such as Living a Feminist Life, Vinyl Freak, Exile and Pride, and Spill, among others. The list also features several books in the World Readers and Latin America Readers series, such as The South Africa Reader, The Dominican Republic Reader, and The Chile Reader.

Subject areas include African American studies, Latin American studies, cultural studies, gender studies, art history and criticism, American studies, music, and poetry. All titles are currently accessible online through NC LIVE or via local NC library catalogs.

“Having our content be broadly available and easily accessible has always been a main focus of Duke University Press’s mission. We are thrilled to partner with NC LIVE to share our books with the people of North Carolina and can’t wait to hear how folks use them in their book clubs and classrooms,” said Kim Steinle, Library Relations and Sales Manager at Duke University Press.

“NC LIVE’s HomeGrown e-book collection grows every year thanks to the generous donations of North Carolina’s libraries,” said Rob Ross, Executive Director of NC LIVE. “This year we are particularly excited to add e-books from a distinguished publisher partner in Duke University Press.”

NC LIVE is a statewide cooperative of 205 libraries that provides access to online articles, e-books, streaming videos, and digital newspapers. This content is freely available to all NC residents through their local library. The HomeGrown Collection contains more than 3,600 e-books from a variety of local publishers.

Duke University Press is a nonprofit scholarly publisher best known for publishing in the humanities, social sciences, and mathematics. The Press publishes approximately 140 books annually and over 50 journals, as well as offering several electronic collections and open-access publishing initiatives.

2020 Pricing Now Available

Duke University Press 2020 pricing for individual journal titles, the e-Duke Journals collections, the e-Duke Books collection, our six e-book subject collections, Euclid Prime, and MSP on Euclid is now available online at dukeupress.edu/libraries.

We are also pleased to announce a new pick-and-choose e-book model, providing customers with volume discounting starting with the purchase of 25 titles. Learn more at dukeupress.edu/pickandchoose.

New titles join the Duke University Press journals list

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the additions of History of the Present and the Romanic Review to its 2020 journals list. Both journals will be included in the e-Duke Journals Scholarly Collection: Expanded.

History of the Present, a biannual journal founded in 2011, offers articles that approach history as a critical endeavor, pressing the boundaries of history’s disciplinary norms.

The Romanic Review, a triannual journal sponsored by the Department of French and Romance Philology at Columbia University, has published a broad diversity of critical approaches to literature published in French, Italian, and Ibero-Romance languages since its founding in 1910.

New e-book subject collections

Duke University Press is now offering libraries new e-book collections: Art and Art History and Asian Studies.

The Art and Art History e-book collection includes over 150 titles that span the discipline, with books in art theory and criticism, performance art, African American art, African and Black Diaspora art, architecture, visual culture, Asian art, Latin American art, Native American and indigenous art, Latinx and Chicanx art, photography, LGBTQ and feminist art, and museum studies.

The Asian Studies e-book collection includes over 300 titles ranging across memoir, theory, cultural studies, film, TV and popular culture, history, politics and political theory, activism, gender studies, LGBTQ studies, art, science studies, music, religious studies, fiction, poetry, environmental studies, sociology, and anthropology, among others.

These new offerings join our existing e-book subject collections in Gender Studies, Latin American Studies, Music and Sound Studies, and Religious Studies.

Black Sacred Music digital archive

Duke University Press is pleased to make the complete archive of Black Sacred Music: A Journal of Theomusicology available digitally for the first time. Edited by Yahya Jongintaba (formerly known as Jon Michael Spencer), the journal was published from 1987 to 1995. The nine-volume archive will be available for purchase beginning in summer 2019.

Black Sacred Music sought to establish theomusicology—a theologically informed musicology—as a distinct discipline, incorporating methods from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and philosophy to examine the full range of black sacred music. Its scope included black secular music, the early days of rap, soul, jazz, civil rights songs, the religious music of Africa and the African diaspora, spirituals, gospel music, and the music of the black church.

Project Euclid welcomes the African Journal of Applied Statistics

Project Euclid now hosts the African Journal of Applied Statistics, which publishes original articles on applied sciences, often using African data. This journal joins Euclid Prime in 2020, with free preview access for current 2019 subscribers.

Tusi Mathematical Research Group journals exit publishing program

After the publication of their 2019 volumes, Duke University Press will no longer publish Annals of Functional Analysis and Banach Journal of Mathematics, both owned by the Tusi Mathematical Research Group (TMRG). Both journals, along with Advances in Operator Theory, owned and published by TMRG, will exit Euclid Prime in 2020. Springer will begin publishing all three journals starting in 2020. Subscribers to Euclid Prime will retain access to previously purchased content published through 2019 for all three journals.

For more information about 2020 pricing, please contact orders@dukeupress.edu.

Illinois Journal of Mathematics Now Available

We are pleased to announce the publication of Illinois Journal of Mathematics (IJM) volume 63, issue 1, the first issue of IJM published by Duke University Press. Browse the issue’s contents on Project Euclid.

Founded in 1957, IJM featured in its inaugural volume the papers of many of the world’s leading mathematicians. Since then, IJM has published many influential papers, including the proof of the Four Color Conjecture, and continues to publish original research articles in all areas of mathematics. The journal is sponsored by the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The editorial board comprises a mix of preeminent mathematicians from within its host department and across the mathematical research establishment.

“We are proud to be associated with the outstanding Duke University Press mathematics publishing program and its flagship journal, the Duke Mathematical Journal,” said Steven Bradlow, Editor-in-Chief of IJM.

“We look forward to providing our expert mathematics publishing support to the editors as they and we work together to ensure that IJM continues to be a valuable resource to the entire mathematics research community,” said Rob Dilworth, Journals Director at Duke University Press.

Individual print-and-online subscriptions to IJM are available, or ask your librarian to subscribe.

Popular Protests in Venezuela

This spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history. This week, HAHR offers a thematic reading list curated by Scott Doebler. All articles are freely available online through the end of August.

Venezuela’s ongoing political drama, popular protests, sustained humanitarian crisis, and growing diaspora have captured the world’s attention. The starkness of the current crisis contrasts markedly with what was until recently a wealthy economy buoyed by colossal oil reserves.

The current political convulsions are far from singular in Venezuela’s history; HAHR has published numerous articles about popular protests throughout Latin America, including many in Venezuela’s history. Presented here are four such articles that explore different outpourings of popular protest in Latin America against the powers that be—some violent, some peaceful, and some a complicated mixture.

The authors investigate the individual conditions that provoked the contestations, often placing them within larger national and global contexts. The articles not only showcase varied local situations spaced over centuries, thus transcending the “colonial” and “modern” divide, but they also represent changing interpretations of popular protests themselves and their role in society.

Civil Disorders and Popular Protests in Late Colonial New Granada” by Anthony McFarlane (1984)
Written as the social history turn was in full swing, McFarlane investigates who participated in “civil disorders” and why by focusing on lesser-known (at the time) challenges to aspects of colonial rule.

Indian Rebellion and Bourbon Reform in New Granada: Riots in Pasto, 1780–1800” by Rebecca Earle (1993)
This study of two rebellions at the turn of the nineteenth century looks at the weakness of state control over distant populations and their continued expectation of autonomy.

Public Land Settlement, Privatization, and Peasant Protest in Duaca, Venezuela, 1870–1936” by Doug Yarrington (1994)
Focusing on understudied Duaca, Venezuela, Yarrington follows changing land ownership patterns and its consequences.

‘A Weapon as Powerful as the Vote’: Urban Protest and Electoral Politics in Venezuela, 1978–1983” by Alejandro Velasco (2010)
This article examines how popular sectors held democracy accountable for representing their interests by hijacking public property.

For additional background reading on Venezuela, check out some of our books on its history and politics. We Created Chávez by George Ciccariello-Maher tells the history of Venezuelan politics from below, explaining how militants, students, women, Afro-indigeneous peoples, and the working-class brought about Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution and, ultimately, brought Hugo Chávez to power. In Channeling the State, Naomi Schiller explores how community television in Venezuela created openings for the urban poor to embrace the state as a collective process with the potential for creating positive social change. Looking beyond Hugo Chávez and the national government, contributors to Venezuela’s Bolivarian Democracy, edited by David Smilde and Daniel Hellinger, examine forms of democracy involving ordinary Venezuelans: in communal councils, cultural activities, blogs, community media, and other forums. The Enduring Legacy by Miguel Tinker Salas is a history of the oil industry’s rise in Venezuela focused especially on the experiences and perceptions of industry employees, both American and Venezuelan.

We also have some titles on Venezuela’s culture. Marcia Ochoa’s Queen for a Day considers how femininities are produced, performed, and consumed on the runways of the Miss Venezuela contest and on the well-traveled Caracas avenue where transgender women (transformistas) project themselves into the urban imaginary. Sujatha Fernandes’s Who Can Stop the Drums is a vivid ethnography of social movements in the barrios, or poor shantytowns, of Caracas, Venezuela. And The Fernando Coronil Reader is a posthumous collection of the Venezuelan anthropologist’s most important work that highlights his deep concern with the global South, Latin American state formation, theories of nature, empire and postcolonialism, and anthrohistory as an intellectual and ethical approach.

Top image: A protester wearing an Anonymous mask and lifting a Venezuelan flag, March 16, 2014. Photo by Jamez42. Licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication. (Find the original here.)

Citizen Science: Practices and Problems

“Citizen Science: Practices and Problems,” the newest issue of East Asian Science, Technology and Society, is now freely available online for three months.

Topics include:

and more. Read the full issue, freely available for three months.

What’s Next for Latinx?

We’re pleased to share “What’s Next for Latinx?”, the newest issue of Theater, edited by Chantal Rodriguez and Tom Sellar. Read the entire issue, freely available for three months.

With roots in protest and social change, Latinx theater carries an artistic vitality and urgency that has only been augmented by resistance to the current wave of repressive white nationalism. Even as U.S. agencies perpetuate inhumane policies and deplorable human rights violations against Latinxs, Latinx theatermakers continue to claim their places on America’s largest stages. In “What’s Next for Latinx?”, contributors ask where Latinx theater is going and what challenges it faces.

Sexual Politics, Sexual Panics

dif_30_1_coverSexual Politics, Sexual Panics,” the newest issue of differences, edited by Robyn Wiegman, is available now.

With essays that parse keywords like “#MeToo,” “Consent,” “Testimony,” and “Trigger Warnings,” and articles on Larry Nassar, feminist disappointment, black feminist alternatives to confession and visibility, and more, the issue acts as an archive of current concerns in a constantly changing landscape of sexual politics.

Read Robyn Wiegman’s introduction, freely available, and Eva Cherniavsky’s essay on #MeToo, open through August. You can browse the rest of the contents here.

Contributors include Kadji Amin, Eva Cherniavsky, Andrea Long Chu, Jennifer Doyle, Joseph J. Fischel, Lynne Joyrich, Jennifer C. Nash, Emily A. Owens, Shoniqua Roach, Juana María Rodríguez, Mairead Sullivan, Samia Vasa, Rebecca Wanzo, Robyn Wiegman, and Terrance Wooten.

LGBTQ+ and Latin American History

Día_de_la_Visibiliad_Lésbica_Santa_Fe-_Argentina_-_Tamara_Zentner-7This spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history.

We’re pleased to make “LGBTQ+ and Latin American History,” a curated collection of HAHR articles, freely available through the end of August:

Also check out “Trans Studies en las Américas,” a new issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (volume 6, issue 2), which offers a hemispheric perspective on trans and travesti studies. Read the introduction, freely available, or browse the contents.

Image: Día de la Visibilidad Lésbica Santa Fe, Argentina, 2018. Photo by Tamara Zentner. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

Trans Studies en las Américas

coverimageIn honor of International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia, we’re proud to spotlight “Trans Studies en las Américas,” the newest issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly.

Trans and travesti studies take many forms throughout the Americas: as scholarly work, interventions into state practices, activist actions, and eruptions of creative energies. These approaches are regionally inflected by flows of people, ideas, technologies, and resources.

Trans Studies en las Américas,” edited by Claudia Sofía Garriga-López, Denilson Lopes, Cole Rizki, and Juana María Rodríguez, offers a hemispheric perspective on trans and travesti issues. Contributors explore how shifts in cultural epistemologies, aesthetics, geographies, and languages enliven theorizations of politics, subjectivity, and embodiment.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.