Author: Jessica Castro-Rappl

Elections in Global History Syllabus

Our Elections in Global History Syllabus, new today, features scholarship on historical elections. Topics include the study of past election events, voting inequity, election quotas, media politics, protests during election times, and more.

All journal articles in this syllabus are freely available through January 31, 2021. Book introductions are always free.

The Elections in Global History Syllabus is one of our many staff-curated syllabi, with topics ranging from global immigration to racial justice to trans rights. Check out all the syllabi here.

COVID-19 and labor history: A guest post by Leon Fink

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected work and has amplified existing labor issues. We asked Leon Fink, Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and editor of Labor: Studies in Working-Class History, how the journal is responding to the COVID-19 crisis and what role labor history scholarship plays in conversations about the pandemic.

As the leading journal in our field and intellectual representative of the Labor and Working Class History Association, we have indeed taken note of the pandemic’s relevance to labor history. COVID-era headlines inevitably invoke many different workers and occupations. In the forefront of the nightly cable news roundup are the medical professionals—doctors and nurses and their virtual army of supporting role players: EMTs, ambulance drivers, aides, janitorial and dietary staff, etc. Also suddenly prominent are a host of service occupations—such as grocery clerks, home health care workers, nursing home aides, restaurant staff, and delivery drivers.

Less noticed, but equally relied upon and designated by their state governments as “essential workers”—i.e., those working at critical infrastructure operations required to remain open—are the warehouse workers from Amazon, Walmart, and Target filling in otherwise-broken supply chains. Also deemed essential, upon a direct order from the president, are the meatpacking and food processing plants.

Two other professions have also received heightened attention. Especially as parents attempt to cope with the still-uncertain trajectory of the current school year, the central role of teachers (and day care providers) to the national economy is highlighted. Finally, of course, we have all been reminded of the impact on our civic health of the actions of the municipal police—not to mention special forces deployed on presidential orders—in either containing or exacerbating social conflict.

If together composing a ‘public’ workforce—not by source of employment, which encompasses both public and private employers, but by common impact on the public welfare—this parade of workers is otherwise highly differentiated. Quite apart from issues of pay, itself a subject of vast differentiation, a considerable disparity—one might even say a vast chasm—separates these work groups on a spectrum of workplace authority. Each of these groups faces not only a distinct micro-environment based on the product or service rendered but is governed by different sets of industrial relations, whether shaped by collective bargaining contracts, government laws and regulations, or one-sided employer determination.

How much voice … should employees themselves have over their jobs, their health and safety on the job, and their employment security?

Given the tensions accentuated by pandemic conditions, the inequalities of workplace voice—quite apart from the material disparities of economic reward—take on enhanced prominence and wider public repercussion. How much voice and/or control, we are obliged to ask, should employees themselves have over their jobs, their health and safety on the job, and their employment security? These are all issues which will inevitably help to compose the coming generation of labor history research and scholarship.

The journal has already responded to the current crisis in two significant ways. First, and fortuitously, we were able to move a magnificent article by Liz Faue and Josiah Rector on an SEIU nurses campaign for protections from needlestick injuries during the HIV crisis into our next issue (vol. 17, issue 4). But we also quickly decided to go for broke with a future special issue on Pandemics and Labor History, for which we’ve recruited a most distinguished group of contributors. They include Samuel Cohn (University of Glasgow), an authority on the Black Death; Aditya Sarkar (University of Warwick) on the bubonic plague in Bombay 1896–1901; Gabriela Soto Laveaga (Harvard University) on Mexico City health politics; Laura Goffman (University of Arizona) on the colonial Middle East; and Jacob Remes (New York University) with a summary piece connecting the COVID-19 pandemic to the North American working-class history of disaster. Although still in a formative stage, we expect this issue to be one of our most important yet.

Learn more about Labor: Studies in Working-Class History or subscribe.

Open Access Week 2020: Hispanic American Historical Review, 1918–1999

On the third day of our Open Access Week blog series, we’re glad to feature a significant project completed earlier this year: the digitization of all 20th-century volumes (1918–1999) of the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), which are available open access. The volumes are accessible here.

This long run of issues allows for students and researchers alike to trace the development of key themes in Latin American historiography across time.

Founded in 1918, HAHR pioneered the study of Latin American history and culture in the United States. Today, HAHR publishes rigorous scholarship on every facet of Latin American history and culture. It is edited by Martha Few, Zachary Morgan, Matthew Restall, and Amara Solari.

“[HAHR] has been central now for a hundred years in helping establish the field and really point to the absolute best scholarship within Latin American history,” said Gisela Fosado, Editorial Director at Duke University Press and member of the HAHR Board of Editors. “It’s always going to be pushing the field, defining the field, bringing out a really wide range of voices.”

Learn more about Duke University Press’s open-access publishing initiatives.

Open Access Week 2020: Our open-access journals

On the second day of our Open Access Week blog series, we’re proud to feature our five open-access journals, three of which—Demography, liquid blackness, and the Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies—are new to Duke University Press in 2021.

Demography, the flagship journal of the Population Association of America, will become platinum open access in 2021 as it joins our publishing program. Since its founding in 1964, Demography has mirrored the vitality, diversity, high intellectual standard, and wide impact of population studies. It is the most cited journal in its field and reaches the membership of one of the largest professional demographic associations in the world. Libraries and institutions, learn how you can support Demography’s conversion to open access.

liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies carves out a place for aesthetic theory and the most radical agenda of Black studies to come together in productive ways, with the goal of attending to the aesthetic work of blackness and the political work of form. In this way, the journal develops innovative approaches to address points of convergence between the exigencies of black life and the many slippery ways in which blackness is encountered in contemporary sonic and visual culture. The journal showcases a variety of scholarly modes, including audio-visual work and experimental and traditional essays.

The Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies is an international, multidisciplinary publication dedicated to research on pre-1945 East Asian humanities. The journal presents new research related to the Sinographic Cosmopolis/Sphere of pre-1945 East Asia, publishing both articles that stay within traditional disciplinary or regional boundaries and works that explore the commonalities and contrasts found in countries of the Sinographic Sphere.

Critical Times, published by the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs and Duke University Press, foregrounds encounters between canonical critical theory and various traditions of critique emerging from other historical legacies. The journal seeks to showcase the multiple forms that critical thought takes today, presenting essays from different areas of the world; to encourage critical analysis, transnational exchange, and political reflection and practice; and to foster new types of intellectual discourse and reformulate the field by accounting for its regional and linguistic inflections.

Environmental Humanities publishes outstanding interdisciplinary scholarship that draws humanities disciplines into conversation with each other, and with the natural and social sciences, around significant environmental issues. Environmental Humanities has a specific focus on publishing the best interdisciplinary scholarship, especially articles that do not fit comfortably within established disciplines and accessible articles that can speak to a broader readership.

Learn more about Duke University Press’s open-access publishing initiatives.

Open Access Week 2020: Project Euclid

It’s Open Access Week, and we’re celebrating with a blog series highlighting our many open-access offerings! Follow along by keeping an eye on our OA Week 2020 tag.

Today’s post features Project Euclid, a not-for-profit hosting and publishing platform for the mathematics and statistics communities, managed jointly by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press. This post is authored by Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid.


Project Euclid aims to make mathematics and statistics literature sustainable to publish, find, and read online. Supporting open-access publishing is a huge part of that mission. Nearly 80% of the content on Project Euclid is openly available, an increase of about 10% in three years.

Project Euclid strives to provide low-cost but feature-rich hosting services for journals, books, and conference proceedings so that publishers can keep the scholarship affordable and widely available to libraries and researchers while sustaining themselves financially. We partner with reputable, scholarly math and stats publishers, societies, and academic departments around the world.

Some editors of open-access journals ask us why they should work with a formal publishing platform at all. While anyone can post articles on a webpage at little or no cost, it’s much harder for readers to discover those articles and to be confident in the quality of the source, or for librarians to include them in searchable catalog systems. Project Euclid offers small publishers the robust features of a large platform designed specifically for mathematics literature, with a suite of hosting, marketing, and customer support services. Journals hosted on Euclid are fully indexed, compatible with library discovery systems, tagged with Mathematics Subject Classifications, search-engine-optimized, and linked directly to crucial mathematics resources like MathSciNet reviews, zbMATH, and arXiv.

We don’t believe that there is any one-size-fits-all approach to access and sustainability. In addition to traditional open-access publishing, Project Euclid is embracing a path to openness that combines low-cost subscriptions for current content with a vast, free archive—a model that has long been successful in mathematics and statistics. We work with subscription-based publications as well as open-access, through direct individual-title subscriptions and the Euclid Prime collection. Prime publishers pay no out-of-pocket hosting fees and earn royalties from Euclid’s sale of the collection to libraries. It’s a great way for small academic publishers to increase dissemination and earn some sustaining revenue at no direct cost. Even for these paid models, Project Euclid encourages publishers to make their subscription-based content freely available three to five years after publication. The result is that across the 91 titles (and growing) that we host, almost 80% of the pages on Project Euclid are freely available to everyone.

We are grateful to work in close collaboration with libraries. Through their low-cost subscriptions to Euclid Prime, libraries support nonprofit, free-to-authors publishing and help keep a large archive of valuable literature freely available to all. Visit the Project Euclid site for a full list of all open-access titles.

Learn more about Duke University Press’s open-access publishing initiatives.

New JHPPL study finds Republican governors delayed COVID-19 policies by an average of 2 days—a period with potentially devastating repercussions

The party of a state’s governor is the single most important predictor of the early adoption of social distancing policies, with Republican governors taking about two days longer to announce these mandates, finds a new study published in the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law.

A two-day delay could result in a 17% to 59% increase in COVID-19 cases, according to prior research.

To investigate why some states were slower to implement social distancing than others beginning in March 2020, the study’s authors compared announcement dates for social distancing measures, controlling for competing explanations such as economic resources and hospital preparedness. All else equal, states led by Republican governors were slower to implement such policies during a critical window of early COVID-19 response. 

The study also found that states may be more likely to adopt social distancing policies when neighboring states act. States with lower population density and states with fewer confirmed cases were both slower to take up policies, and gross state product had no significant effect on timing.

Duke University Press Converts Flagship Journal Demography to Open Access

Demography, the flagship journal of the Population Association of America (PAA), will become open access in 2021 as it joins the Duke University Press journals publishing program.

“PAA’s mission is to promote and support high-quality population research and converting Demography to a platinum open-access journal dovetails perfectly with that mission. We are excited to work with Duke University Press on this new model that maintains Demography’s position as the top journal in our field, is fiscally sound for our organization, and more broadly shares top-notch demographic research,” said PAA President Dr. Eileen Crimmins.

Since its founding in 1964, Demography has mirrored the vitality, diversity, high intellectual standard, and wide impact of population studies. Published bimonthly, the journal presents high-quality original research by scholars in a wide range of disciplines, encompassing a variety of methodological approaches to population research. It maintains a global geographic focus and a broad temporal scope. Demography is the most cited journal in its field and reaches the membership of one of the largest professional demographic associations in the world.

“In moving Demography from a traditional paid subscription model to open access, we’re thrilled that the worldwide community of population researchers will have access to its content, especially at this moment when access to reliable, peer-reviewed information is critically important,” said Dean Smith, Director of Duke University Press.

“Duke University supports open access and is committed to bringing scholarship to a wide community of researchers,” said Sally Kornbluth, Duke University Provost and Jo Rae Wright University Professor. “Through the open publication of Demography, Duke University Press is advancing the University’s mission to make intellectual discoveries and debates available to as broad a public as possible.”

Funding Model and Call for Support
Demography’s platinum open-access funding model relies entirely on financial support from libraries and research centers. “The conversion of Demography is a significant opportunity for the library community to join with other stakeholders in support of sustainable, open-access, university-based publishing,” said Celeste Feather, Senior Director of Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives at LYRASIS, a nonprofit membership organization serving libraries, museums, and archives, which will facilitate contributions to the journal.

Libraries, research centers, and other organizations can make a concrete choice to support open-access content at any of the following levels:

Level 1: $4,000 and up
Level 2: $2,000 to $3,999
Level 3: $1,000 to $1,999
Level 4: $500 to $999

Please contact libraryrelations@dukeupress.edu or lsp@lyrasis.org if your institution would like to contribute. Visit dukeupress.edu/demography-open-access for more information.

About
Duke University Press is a nonprofit scholarly publisher with a focus on the humanities, the social sciences, and mathematics. The Press publishes approximately 140 books annually and more than 50 journals, as well as offering several electronic collections and open-access publishing initiatives.

The Population Association of America (PAA) is a nonprofit, scientific, professional organization established to promote and support high-quality population research. PAA members include demographers, sociologists, economists, public health professionals, and other individuals interested in research and education in the population field.

LYRASIS is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit membership organization whose mission is to support enduring access to the world’s shared academic, scientific, and cultural heritage through leadership in open technologies, content services, digital solutions, and collaboration with archives, libraries, museums, and knowledge communities worldwide.

For more information, contact:
Robert Dilworth
Journals Director
journalsdirector@dukeupress.edu

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1968 Decentered

In our current moment, with a nearly global sense that the present situation is untenable and that there remains intense interest in the possibility of radical social change, many people are looking for models, political imaginaries, and forgotten futures we might return to. With this in mind, contributors to “1968 Decentered,” a new issue of the South Atlantic Quarterly guest-edited by Jonathan Flatley and Robert Bird, explore the practices and projects occurring in or around 1968 that were trying to alter the structures of power. In doing so, they refresh, reinvigorate, and expand our sense of what is possible.

The contributors represent 1968 not as an event that reverberated from the center outwards in ripples of more or less proximate consequences, but as the moment when events on the peripheries reverberated at the center as fissures in the basic structures of power. The issue also includes the section “The New Feminist Internationale,” which is free to read for six months. Start reading here, or pick up a copy of the issue.

For more explorations of 1968, don’t miss these books and journal issues:

1968 Mexico: Constellations of Freedom and Democracy by Susana Draper offers a nuanced perspective of the 1968 movement in Mexico. Draper challenges the dominant cultural narrative of the movement that has emphasized the importance of the October 2nd Tlatelolco Massacre and the responses of male student leaders. From marginal cinema collectives to women’s cooperative experiments, Draper reveals new archives of revolutionary participation that provide insight into how 1968 and its many afterlives are understood in Mexico and beyond.

In “Legacies of ’68“, an issue of Cultural Politics edited by Morgan Adamson and Sarah Hamblin, contributors discuss the historical significance and cultural legacies of 1968 from the vantage point of contemporary politics. Focusing on the year’s geographical scope and epistemological legacies, the authors map out the global connections between the various movements that comprise 1968 and trace the legacies of these ideas to examine how the year continues to shape political, cultural, and social discourse on both the left and the right.

In Speaking of Flowers: Student Movements and the Making and Remembering of 1968 in Military Brazil, Victoria Langland offers an innovative study of student activism during Brazil’s military dictatorship (1964–85) and an examination of the very notion of student activism, which changed dramatically in response to the student protests of 1968.

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

Yesterday was International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, a United Nations–recognized day dedicated to raising awareness of the needs of Indigenous peoples. In observance, we’d like to uplift some of our recent scholarship in Indigenous studies.

Tiffany Lethabo King, Jenell Navarro, and Andrea Smith, the editors of Otherwise Worlds, point out that presumptions of solidarity, antagonism, or incommensurability between Black and Native communities are insufficient to understand the relationships between both groups. This volume’s scholars, artist, and activists investigate the complex relationships between settler colonialism and anti-Blackness to explore the political possibilities that emerge from such inquiries.

In Fictions of Land and Flesh, Mark Rifkin turns to black and indigenous speculative fiction to show how it offers a site to better understand black and indigenous political movements’ differing orientations in ways that can foster forms of mutual engagement and cooperation without subsuming them into a single political framework in the name of solidarity. 

In Detours, a brilliant reinvention of the travel guide edited by Hokulani K. Aikau and Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez, artists, activists, and scholars redirect readers from the fantasy of Hawai‘i as a tropical paradise and tourist destination toward a multilayered and holistic engagement with Hawai‘i’s culture, complex history, and the effects of colonialism.

Tiffany Lethabo King uses the shoal—an offshore geologic formation that is neither land nor sea—as metaphor, mode of critique, and methodology to theorize the encounter between Black studies and Native studies and its potential to create new epistemologies, forms of practice, and lines of critical inquiry in The Black Shoals.

In Listen but Don’t Ask Question, Kevin Fellezs traces the ways in which slack key guitar—a traditional Hawaiian musical style played on an acoustic steel-string guitar—is a site for the articulation of the complex histories, affiliations, and connotations of Hawaiian belonging.

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Getting Back the Land: Anticolonial and Indigenous Strategies of Reclamation,” a South Atlantic Quarterly issue, offers “diagnosis, critique, and radical visions for the future from some of the leading thinkers and experts on the tactics of the settler capitalist state, and on the exercises of Indigenous jurisdiction that counter them,” write issue editors Shiri Pasternak and Dayna Nadine Scott in their introduction. The issue also includes a section on the rise of precarious workers.

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Indigenous activism in the Americas has long focused on the symbolic reclamation of land. Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives, contributors to “Indigenous Narratives of Territory and Creation,” an issue of English Language Notes edited by Leila Gómez, explore narratives of territory and origin that provide a foundation for this political practice. The contributors study Indigenous-language stories from displaced communities, analyzing the meaning and power of these narratives in the context of diaspora and the struggle for land.

As modern European empires expanded, written language was critical to articulations of imperial authority and justifications of conquest. For imperial administrators and thinkers, the non-literacy of “native” societies demonstrated their primitiveness and inability to change. Yet as the contributors to Indigenous Textual Cultures, edited by Tony Ballantyne, Lachy Paterson, and Angela Wanhalla, make clear, indigenous communities were highly adaptive and created novel, dynamic literary practices that preserved indigenous knowledge traditions.

In “Birds and Feathers in the Ancient and Colonial Mesoamerican World,” an issue of Ethnohistory edited by Allison Caplan and Lisa Sousa, contributors reconstruct the integrated roles of real and symbolic birds and their feathers in ancient and colonial Mesoamerican and trans-Atlantic societies. By foregrounding indigenous knowledge and value systems, they reexamine the significance of birds and feathers in constructions of the natural world, philosophy and religion, society and economics, and artistic practice.

Also keep an eye out for English Language Notes 58:2, “Indigenous Futures and Medieval Pasts,” forthcoming in October. Sign up for issue alerts to receive email notification when it’s available.

Literature, Activism, and Gendered Intimacy in Modern and Contemporary Iran

coverimageLiterature, Activism, and Gendered Intimacy in Modern and Contemporary Iran,” a new special issue of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, explores Iranian gendered and national identities and experiences in the aftermath of European imperialism and the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

Contributors call attention to the lived experiences of women in modern-to-contemporary Iranian society, showcasing the agency and creativity of their responses to these experiences.

Articles include:

Explore the contents here or purchase this issue.