Author: Jessica Castro-Rappl

Open-access journal liquid blackness to join Duke University Press

We are excited to announce that liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies, an open-access journal, will join Duke University Press’s publishing program in Spring 2021.

liquid blackness seeks to carve out a place for aesthetic theory and the most radical agenda of Black Studies to come together in productive ways, with a double goal: to fully attend to the aesthetic work of blackness and to the political work of form. In this way, the journal strives to develop innovative approaches to address points of convergence between the exigencies of black life and the many slippery ways in which blackness is encountered in contemporary sonic and visual culture.

Yanique Norman, Fatherlessness 1 (2010). Photo by Mike Jensen

liquid blackness was founded in 2014 at Georgia State University by faculty member Alessandra Raengo and members of the liquid blackness research group: doctoral students Lauren McLeod Cramer, Cameron Kunzelman, and Kristin Juarez. Raengo and Cramer are the journal’s editors.

The journal showcases a variety of scholarly modes, including audio-visual work, poetry, and essays. It aims to fully explore who can do theory (scholars, artists, activists…), how theory can be done (in image, writing, archiving, curating, social activism…), and what a Black aesthetic object is (“high”/“low” art, sound and image, practice and praxis, the work of individual artists and ensembles…).

We look forward to welcoming liquid blackness beginning with its Spring 2021 special issue, “Liquidity.” Learn more about the journal.

Now Available Open Access: Hispanic American Historical Review, 1918–1999

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We are glad to announce that all 20th-century volumes (1918–1999) of the Hispanic American Historical Review have been digitized and are now available open access.

Start reading here.

We are proud to offer this open-access resource, especially during a challenging time when many scholars are accessing resources remotely. This long run of issues allows for students and researchers alike to trace the development of key themes in Latin American historiography across time.

Founded in 1918, HAHR pioneered the study of Latin American history and culture in the United States. Today, HAHR publishes rigorous scholarship on every facet of Latin American history and culture. It is edited by Martha Few, Zachary Morgan, Matthew Restall, and Amara Solari.

“[HAHR] has been central now for a hundred years in helping establish the field and really point to the absolute best scholarship within Latin American history,” said Gisela Fosado, editorial director at Duke University Press and member of the HAHR Board of Editors. “It’s always going to be pushing the field, defining the field, bringing out a really wide range of voices.”

Free Duke University Press resources via Project MUSE

In response to current challenges scholars face as a result of COVID-19, Duke University Press is opening archival content for around 20 of our journals hosted on Project MUSE.

Around five years of back content (1999 to 2004) are freely available through June 30, 2020, for select titles. We are also opening all available content for East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal.

Titles included are:

“As so many institutions transition to online instruction, we hope that these additional resources will be useful,” said Kimberly Steinle, Library Relations and Sales Manager.

Read more about the additional support Duke University Press is offering to scholars and libraries at this time. A complete list of publishers offering free resources on MUSE is available here.

Radical Care

Care has re-entered the zeitgeist. Situating discussions of care within a historical trajectory of feminist, queer, and Black activism, contributors to “Radical Care,” a special issue of Social Text, consider how individuals and communities receive and provide care in order to survive in environments that challenge their very existence.

They explore how trans activists find resilience and vitality through coalitional labor; argue that social movements should expand mutual aid strategies, focusing on solidarity over charity; discuss a neoliberal university wellness culture that seeks to patch up structural care deficits with quick fixes like meditation apps and yoga classes; and more.

As the traditionally undervalued labor of caring becomes recognized as a key element of survival, contributors show how radical care provides a roadmap for not only enduring precarious worlds but also envisioning new futures. In the face of state-sanctioned violence, economic crisis, and impending ecological collapse, collective care offers a way forward.

Read the introduction by editors Hi‘ilei Julia Kawehipuaakahaopulani Hobart and Tamara Kneese, freely available, and check out the issue’s full contents.

Navigating the Threat of Pandemic

Amid the worldwide spread of COVID-19, it’s a challenging time, and our thoughts are with those affected by this disease. In support and solidarity, we are providing free access to books and journal articles that we hope will build knowledge and understanding of how we navigate the spread of communicable diseases.

Our “Navigating the Threat of Pandemic” syllabus is available here. Listed books are free to read online until June 1, 2020, and journal articles are free until October 1.

Revolutionary Positions: Gender and Sexuality in Cuba and Beyond

As the Cuban revolution reaches its 60th anniversary, “Revolutionary Positions: Gender and Sexuality in Cuba and Beyond,” a new issue of Radical History Review edited by Michelle Chase and Isabella Cosse, offers an exploration of the revolution’s impact through the lens of sexuality and gender.

The contributors to this issue study Cuban internationalist campaigns, the relationship between cultural diplomacy and mass media, and visual images of revolution and solidarity. They follow the emergence and negotiation of new gender ideals through the transgendering of Che’s “New Man,” the Cuban travels of Angela Davis, calls for sexual revolution in the Dutch Atlantic, and gender representations during the 1964 “Campaign of Terror” in Chile. In doing so, the authors provide fresh insight into Cuba’s transnational legacy on politics and culture during the Cold War and beyond.

Browse the table of contents, and start reading with Sarah J. Seidman’s article “Angela Davis in Cuba as Symbol and Subject,” free through the end of May.

You may also enjoy Isabella Cosse’s book Mafalda: A Social and Political History of Latin America’s Global Comic, first published in Argentina in 2014 and now available in English, which analyzes the vast appeal of the Argentinian comic Mafalda and its exploration of complex topics such as class identity, modernization, and state violence.

Economic Knowledge in Socialism, 1945–1989

Economic Knowledge in Socialism, 1945–1989” edited by Till Düppe and Ivan Boldyrev, a supplement to volume 51 of History of Political Economy, is now available.

While the development of economics in the U.S. during the Cold War has been subject to many studies, scholars from various disciplines have only recently begun exploring the other kind of economics during the same period: the economics in the Soviet Union and other socialist countries. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, this research has benefited not only from the newly open archives, but also from a more open environment for the sharing of memories and reminiscences. “Economic Knowledge in Socialism, 1945–1989” represents an exemplary cross-disciplinary effort for better understanding various domains of economic knowledge and, more broadly, the social sciences in the Eastern bloc.

“How does a socialist economy function and how can it best be managed? The essays in this rich and fascinating volume excavate how economists throughout the socialist world worked to create the conceptual and institutional tools they needed to approach these questions. By uncovering the diverse legacies of economic thought under socialism, the authors in this collection not only contribute to our understanding of the socialist past, but encourage us to question contemporary economic orthodoxies.” —Melissa Feinberg, Rutgers University

“This volume explodes the protective shield that has long kept the history of socialist experts a world apart, seemingly unrelated to anything outside it. The articles collected in this excellent volume draw upon exciting advances in science studies and intellectual history to demonstrate that the forms of economic knowledge seemingly peculiar to socialist governance were, in fact, strongly influenced by the pre-socialist tradition of economic expertise in Eastern Europe, as well as by reciprocal exchanges with Western capitalist experts. In the process, the volume also paints a fascinating gallery of flesh-and-blood socialist experts, neither subservient mouthpieces of official dogma nor courageous dissidents, but ordinary individuals caught up in an extraordinary ideological machinery.” —Gil Eyal, Columbia University

Read the issue’s free introduction and its table of contents, or purchase the issue.

-30- The End of the Story

Congratulations to differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies on reaching its thirtieth anniversary! The journal’s new issue “-30- The End of the Story” marks the occasion, borrowing the “-30-” mark that journalists in North America traditionally have used to indicate the end of a story.

“While one might debate whether or not the story of critical feminism itself has come to an end, there is no question that much has changed in the field. We invited contributors to reflect on the critical preoccupations that have happily or unhappily expired over the years, which ones they might like to see go—or not,” write the editors.

Check out the issue’s contents, including Thangam Ravindranathan’s “The Rise of the Sea and The Novel,” a speculative reflection on literary fiction’s ability to register the effects of climate change, which is free through April.

New Subject Collections: Anthropology; African American, African, and Black Diaspora Studies

We’re pleased to announce the addition of two new e-book subject collections to our library offerings: the African American, African, and Black Diaspora Studies collection and the Anthropology collection.

The African American, African, and Black Diaspora Studies e-book collection includes more than 350 titles that span the humanities and social sciences, covering history, religion, literature, art, music, anthropology, sociology, and other areas of study. Reflecting the global black experience, titles explore regions including Africa, Europe, Asia, the Caribbean, and North and South America. The collection includes work by essential thinkers including C. Eric Lincoln, Deborah Thomas, Fred Moten, Houston Baker, Achille Mbembe, Jennifer Nash, Karla Holloway, and others.

The Anthropology e-book collection presents over 550 titles in a discipline for which Duke University Press is well-known. Through traditional fieldwork and ethnography, cutting-edge theoretical approaches, and innovative reinventions of anthropological writing, the authors in this collection represent the best scholarship in the field. From analyses of the living history offered at Colonial Williamsburg to the complex interweavings of television and gender in postcolonial India, from Islam and political power in a village in Niger to the forms of performative public protest in Cochabamba, Bolivia, this collection shows the possibilities of anthropological research.

These new additions join our existing collections in Art and Art History, Asian Studies, Gender Studies, Latin American Studies, Music and Sound Studies, and Religious Studies. Ask your librarian to learn more here.


New Journals in 2020: History of the Present & Romanic Review

This coming year, we’re excited to welcome History of the Present: A Journal of Critical History and the Romanic Review to our journals publishing program. Both journals will begin publication with Duke University Press in late spring.

History of the Present, a journal devoted to history as a critical endeavor, is edited by Joan Wallach Scott, Andrew Aisenberg, Brian Connolly, Ben Kafka, Jennifer Morgan, Sylvia Schafer, and Mrinalini Sinha. The journal’s aim is twofold: to create a space in which scholars can reflect on the role history plays in making categories of contemporary debate appear inevitable, natural, or culturally necessary; and to publish work that calls into question certainties about the relationship between past and present that are taken for granted by the majority of practicing historians. Read more about the journal in our editor interview.

The Romanic Review is a journal devoted to the study of Romance literatures. Founded in 1910 by Henry Alfred Todd, it covers all periods of French, Italian, and Ibero-Romance languages and literature, and it welcomes a broad diversity of critical approaches. It is edited by Elisabeth Ladenson and published by the Department of French and Romance Philology at Columbia University in cooperation with the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures and the Department of Italian.