Author: Jessica Castro-Rappl

Duke University Press Converts Flagship Journal Demography to Open Access

Demography, the flagship journal of the Population Association of America (PAA), will become open access in 2021 as it joins the Duke University Press journals publishing program.

“PAA’s mission is to promote and support high-quality population research and converting Demography to a platinum open-access journal dovetails perfectly with that mission. We are excited to work with Duke University Press on this new model that maintains Demography’s position as the top journal in our field, is fiscally sound for our organization, and more broadly shares top-notch demographic research,” said PAA President Dr. Eileen Crimmins.

Since its founding in 1964, Demography has mirrored the vitality, diversity, high intellectual standard, and wide impact of population studies. Published bimonthly, the journal presents high-quality original research by scholars in a wide range of disciplines, encompassing a variety of methodological approaches to population research. It maintains a global geographic focus and a broad temporal scope. Demography is the most cited journal in its field and reaches the membership of one of the largest professional demographic associations in the world.

“In moving Demography from a traditional paid subscription model to open access, we’re thrilled that the worldwide community of population researchers will have access to its content, especially at this moment when access to reliable, peer-reviewed information is critically important,” said Dean Smith, Director of Duke University Press.

“Duke University supports open access and is committed to bringing scholarship to a wide community of researchers,” said Sally Kornbluth, Duke University Provost and Jo Rae Wright University Professor. “Through the open publication of Demography, Duke University Press is advancing the University’s mission to make intellectual discoveries and debates available to as broad a public as possible.”

Funding Model and Call for Support
Demography’s platinum open-access funding model relies entirely on financial support from libraries and research centers. “The conversion of Demography is a significant opportunity for the library community to join with other stakeholders in support of sustainable, open-access, university-based publishing,” said Celeste Feather, Senior Director of Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives at LYRASIS, a nonprofit membership organization serving libraries, museums, and archives, which will facilitate contributions to the journal.

Libraries, research centers, and other organizations can make a concrete choice to support open-access content at any of the following levels:

Level 1: $4,000 and up
Level 2: $2,000 to $3,999
Level 3: $1,000 to $1,999
Level 4: $500 to $999

Please contact libraryrelations@dukeupress.edu or lsp@lyrasis.org if your institution would like to contribute. Visit dukeupress.edu/demography-open-access for more information.

About
Duke University Press is a nonprofit scholarly publisher with a focus on the humanities, the social sciences, and mathematics. The Press publishes approximately 140 books annually and more than 50 journals, as well as offering several electronic collections and open-access publishing initiatives.

The Population Association of America (PAA) is a nonprofit, scientific, professional organization established to promote and support high-quality population research. PAA members include demographers, sociologists, economists, public health professionals, and other individuals interested in research and education in the population field.

LYRASIS is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit membership organization whose mission is to support enduring access to the world’s shared academic, scientific, and cultural heritage through leadership in open technologies, content services, digital solutions, and collaboration with archives, libraries, museums, and knowledge communities worldwide.

For more information, contact:
Robert Dilworth
Journals Director
journalsdirector@dukeupress.edu

###

1968 Decentered

In our current moment, with a nearly global sense that the present situation is untenable and that there remains intense interest in the possibility of radical social change, many people are looking for models, political imaginaries, and forgotten futures we might return to. With this in mind, contributors to “1968 Decentered,” a new issue of the South Atlantic Quarterly guest-edited by Jonathan Flatley and Robert Bird, explore the practices and projects occurring in or around 1968 that were trying to alter the structures of power. In doing so, they refresh, reinvigorate, and expand our sense of what is possible.

The contributors represent 1968 not as an event that reverberated from the center outwards in ripples of more or less proximate consequences, but as the moment when events on the peripheries reverberated at the center as fissures in the basic structures of power. The issue also includes the section “The New Feminist Internationale,” which is free to read for six months. Start reading here, or pick up a copy of the issue.

For more explorations of 1968, don’t miss these books and journal issues:

1968 Mexico: Constellations of Freedom and Democracy by Susana Draper offers a nuanced perspective of the 1968 movement in Mexico. Draper challenges the dominant cultural narrative of the movement that has emphasized the importance of the October 2nd Tlatelolco Massacre and the responses of male student leaders. From marginal cinema collectives to women’s cooperative experiments, Draper reveals new archives of revolutionary participation that provide insight into how 1968 and its many afterlives are understood in Mexico and beyond.

In “Legacies of ’68“, an issue of Cultural Politics edited by Morgan Adamson and Sarah Hamblin, contributors discuss the historical significance and cultural legacies of 1968 from the vantage point of contemporary politics. Focusing on the year’s geographical scope and epistemological legacies, the authors map out the global connections between the various movements that comprise 1968 and trace the legacies of these ideas to examine how the year continues to shape political, cultural, and social discourse on both the left and the right.

In Speaking of Flowers: Student Movements and the Making and Remembering of 1968 in Military Brazil, Victoria Langland offers an innovative study of student activism during Brazil’s military dictatorship (1964–85) and an examination of the very notion of student activism, which changed dramatically in response to the student protests of 1968.

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

Yesterday was International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, a United Nations–recognized day dedicated to raising awareness of the needs of Indigenous peoples. In observance, we’d like to uplift some of our recent scholarship in Indigenous studies.

Tiffany Lethabo King, Jenell Navarro, and Andrea Smith, the editors of Otherwise Worlds, point out that presumptions of solidarity, antagonism, or incommensurability between Black and Native communities are insufficient to understand the relationships between both groups. This volume’s scholars, artist, and activists investigate the complex relationships between settler colonialism and anti-Blackness to explore the political possibilities that emerge from such inquiries.

In Fictions of Land and Flesh, Mark Rifkin turns to black and indigenous speculative fiction to show how it offers a site to better understand black and indigenous political movements’ differing orientations in ways that can foster forms of mutual engagement and cooperation without subsuming them into a single political framework in the name of solidarity. 

In Detours, a brilliant reinvention of the travel guide edited by Hokulani K. Aikau and Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez, artists, activists, and scholars redirect readers from the fantasy of Hawai‘i as a tropical paradise and tourist destination toward a multilayered and holistic engagement with Hawai‘i’s culture, complex history, and the effects of colonialism.

Tiffany Lethabo King uses the shoal—an offshore geologic formation that is neither land nor sea—as metaphor, mode of critique, and methodology to theorize the encounter between Black studies and Native studies and its potential to create new epistemologies, forms of practice, and lines of critical inquiry in The Black Shoals.

In Listen but Don’t Ask Question, Kevin Fellezs traces the ways in which slack key guitar—a traditional Hawaiian musical style played on an acoustic steel-string guitar—is a site for the articulation of the complex histories, affiliations, and connotations of Hawaiian belonging.

saq_119_2_cover

Getting Back the Land: Anticolonial and Indigenous Strategies of Reclamation,” a South Atlantic Quarterly issue, offers “diagnosis, critique, and radical visions for the future from some of the leading thinkers and experts on the tactics of the settler capitalist state, and on the exercises of Indigenous jurisdiction that counter them,” write issue editors Shiri Pasternak and Dayna Nadine Scott in their introduction. The issue also includes a section on the rise of precarious workers.

coverimage

Indigenous activism in the Americas has long focused on the symbolic reclamation of land. Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives, contributors to “Indigenous Narratives of Territory and Creation,” an issue of English Language Notes edited by Leila Gómez, explore narratives of territory and origin that provide a foundation for this political practice. The contributors study Indigenous-language stories from displaced communities, analyzing the meaning and power of these narratives in the context of diaspora and the struggle for land.

Also keep an eye out for Ethnohistory 67:3, “Birds and Feathers in the Ancient and Colonial Mesoamerican World,” and English Language Notes 58:2, “Indigenous Futures and Medieval Pasts,” both forthcoming in October. Sign up for issue alerts to receive email notification when they’re available.

Literature, Activism, and Gendered Intimacy in Modern and Contemporary Iran

coverimageLiterature, Activism, and Gendered Intimacy in Modern and Contemporary Iran,” a new special issue of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, explores Iranian gendered and national identities and experiences in the aftermath of European imperialism and the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

Contributors call attention to the lived experiences of women in modern-to-contemporary Iranian society, showcasing the agency and creativity of their responses to these experiences.

Articles include:

Explore the contents here or purchase this issue.

Cold War Feminisms in East Asia

pos_28_3_coverCold War Feminisms in East Asia,” a new issue of positions: asia critique, unpacks three contested and varied concepts: the Cold War, feminism, and East Asia. Contributors challenge conventional understandings of these terms, discussing the temporality of the Cold War as “victoriously ended,” the spatialization of East Asia as an Orientalist category “over there,” and the myopia of Western feminism.

The issue, edited by Suzy Kim, asks how the Cold War shaped feminist movements and cultures in their critical analyses and possibilities for organization; how the women’s movements before the Cold War destabilize Cold War paradigms; and what challenges remain for contemporary theory and praxes for women, sexual minorities, and other dispossessed communities as a result of Cold War feminisms in East Asia.

Read the free introduction, as well as Kozue Akibayashi’s “Cold War Shadows of Japan’s Imperial Legacies for Women in East Asia,” which is free through the end of October. The full table of contents is available here.

2021 Pricing Updates

In recognition of the financial challenges that many libraries now face as a result of COVID-19, Duke University Press has made the decision to keep 2020 prices for the 2021 calendar year for our journals and electronic collection products (with the exception of our subject collections, where the pricing is based on the number of included titles).

While it is difficult for us, as a nonprofit publisher, to keep our pricing unchanged, we hope that this decision will help to ease burdens on libraries during this unprecedented time. Please visit our COVID-19 response page to learn more about our efforts to support libraries and our readers, including extended grace access, content trials, syllabi, and more.

Pricing will remain unchanged for direct journal subscriptions, the e-Duke Books and e-Duke Journals collections, DMJ 100, MSP on Euclid, and Euclid Prime. Detailed information is accessible at dukeupress.edu/libraries. If your library has a custom deal, please contact libraryrelations@dukeupress.edu to confirm your price.

We appreciate the outpouring of feedback from our library community about how best to offer our support during this time, and we invite you to continue reaching out to us. Additional updates about our 2021 offerings follow.

New OA titles join the Duke University Press journals list

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the additions of open-access journals liquid blackness and the Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies to its 2021 list. Both journals will be included in the e-Duke Journals collection.

liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies, a biannual journal founded at Georgia State University in 2014, carves out a place for aesthetic theory and the most radical agenda of black studies to come together in order to achieve a double goal: to fully attend to both the aesthetic work of blackness and the political work of form.

The Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies, a biannual journal founded in 2001 and published on behalf of Sungkyunkwan University, promotes new research on pre-1945 East Asian humanities, publishing articles that stay within traditional disciplinary or regional boundaries as well as works that explore the commonalities and contrasts of countries in the Sinographic Sphere.

E-books available this week through GOBI

Single-title Duke University Press e-books hosted on our content platform, read.dukeupress.edu, will be available starting this week to purchase through GOBI. More than 2,700 DRM-free backlist and current titles will be available, and purchases include unlimited multiuser access. Librarians who are interested in single-title purchases via GOBI should contact their GOBI Collection Development Manager.

East Asian Science, Technology and Society exits publishing program

After the publication of its 2020 volume, Duke University Press will no longer publish East Asian Science, Technology and Society. We will be in touch in the coming months with information regarding the new publisher and previously purchased content.

For more information about 2021 pricing, please contact libraryrelations@dukeupress.edu.

Freely Available Resources for #BlackLivesMatter Activists

Over the past several weeks, we’ve seen an outpouring of response from grieving communities against structural oppression and police brutality. As we balance political action and education about history and critical race theory, we encourage you to read and share the following resources with your community.

Syllabi

Our staff-curated syllabi offer journal articles and issues that are free for a limited time; please note that the books on these lists are not free but can be purchased via your local black-owned bookstore.

Syllabus topics include:

See the full list here.

Articles on racial inequity & COVID-19

The Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law has released pre-publication manuscripts about COVID-19 and health policy, which are free to read until late August. Several of these articles, such as “Racism and the Political Economy of COVID-19: Will We Continue to Resurrect the Past?” by Zinzi Bailey and J. Robin Moon, address the structural racism providing the foundation for significant racial inequity during this pandemic. See the full article list here.

Policing and state violence resources from Radical History Review

The Radical History Review has curated a list of articles on policing and state violence. These articles, along with RHR’s new issue “Policing, Justice, and the Radical Imagination,” are free to read online through the end of September. (This issue can be read alongside Public Culture‘s 2019 issue “Violence and Policing,” also free through September as part of our Police Violence Syllabus.)

Open-access books

Duke University Press has published many open-access books, all accessible here. Titles of interest include Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism and Emancipation by Calvin L. Warren, Everything Man: The Form and Function of Paul Robeson by Shana L. Redmond, The Race of Sound: Listening, Timbre, and Vocality in African American Music by Nina Sun Eidsheim, and An Historical Account of the Black Empire of Hayti by Marcus Rainsford.

Black art resources from Nka

In recognition of the importance of art and visual culture in the history of struggle against racism, the following issues of Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art are free online through the end of September:

Time Out of Joint: The Queer and Customary in Africa

GLQ_26_3_prIn “Time Out of Joint: The Queer and Customary in Africa,” a new issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, contributors investigate how queer theory might change when African texts, experiences, and concepts are placed front and center rather than treated as examples or case studies.

The authors consider what the concept of customary does to the dialectic of tradition and modernity that is at the heart of much Africanist scholarship. Can queer theoretical texts travel beyond the North Atlantic world that made them without reproducing imperial ways of knowing? Can there be an African queer theory? In posing these questions, the authors encourage readers to consider queerness from and within Africa, exploring what African customary forms of gender and sexuality might do to the antinormativity of queer theory and how presumptions within Euro-American queer scholarship contribute to Afro-pessimist or Afro-optimist scholarship.

The issue’s introduction by editors Kirk Fiereck, Neville Hoad, and Danai S. Mupotsa is free to read online. Keguro Macharia’s article “belated: interruption,” which considers belatedness in relation to the encounter between queer and Africa, is free as well through the end of September.

Learn more about GLQ or purchase “Time Out of Joint” here.

Policing, Justice, and the Radical Imagination

rhrPolicing, Justice, and the Radical Imagination,” a new issue of Radical History Review, is now available free online through the end of September.

The issue, edited by Amy Chazkel, Monica Kim, and A. Naomi Paik, helps us imagine a world without police by examining historical cases in which people resolved social problems and maintained social peace through means other than relying on formal institutions of law enforcement. Contributors consider what new relationships and ways of dealing with violence and harm might emerge when we focus our gaze on those specific historical moments when people chose to carve out communal relations that operated beyond the policing function of the state.

Several articles from RHR‘s archive that address policing are also freely available through the end of September—see the full list on RHR‘s blog The Abusable Past.

Start reading “Policing, Justice, and the Radical Imagination” here. To subscribe to Radical History Review or purchase an issue, visit dukeupress.edu/rhr.

Political Protests and Movements of Resistance Syllabus

politicalprotestsOur syllabi series highlights articles, books, and journal issues that encourage thoughtful discussion of today’s most pressing issues. The Political Protests and Movements of Resistance Syllabus, new today, lists titles that tackle topics of political protest, resistance, and activism. Subjects include transnational social movements, spatial reclamation, student occupation, protest literature, and more.

All journal articles and issues in this syllabus are freely available online until August 31, 2020. The books in this syllabus can be purchased from your local independent bookseller, from online booksellers, and at dukeupress.edu.

Start reading the Political Protests and Movements of Resistance Syllabus, or explore our full list of syllabi, many with free journals content.