Author: Laura Sell

Publicity and Advertising Manager, Duke University Press

Reading Resolutions from Our Staff

Happy New Year! In 2019, why not make your resolutions literary? Our staff share their reading resolutions for the coming year. What are yours? Let us know in the comments!

Maria Volpe, Assistant to the Director:  “My book resolutions are to read three books published by Duke University Press, and to find a book that my two boys will look forward to reading with me every night!”

Nancy Sampson, Production Coordinator: “This year I realized that screen-based entertainment had taken over my leisure time and I hadn’t been reading as many books as I used to. I set a goal to read eight books in 2018 and surpassed it. My tactic was to read every other night instead of automatically going to social media, news, or playing games. I intend to set a higher goal for 2019 and look forward to getting back to one of my favorite pastimes.”

norse godsKatja Moos, Digital Collections Sales Manager: “I would like to read more books on ancient history and world mythology. Norse mythology, Greek gods and goddesses, rise and fall of the Roman Empire, the Silk Road, the Age of Exploration, and the Mayans are all fascinating to me. How did ancient cultures shape our world today?”

Kasia Repeta, Digital Marketing Coordinator: “Korean ancient legends, Korean pottery, Korean migration, Korean pop… This year I am going to take a journey to the Korean Peninsula through its literature. My dearest friend from South Korea recommended to me her favorite contemporary South Korean novelists, Ji-Young Gong and Young-ha Kim, with works translated into English.”

lose wellAmy Walter, Production Coordinator: “I have a two-part reading resolution this year. The first is to read more old fashioned print books (don’t tell anyone, but I may be spending too much time reading romance novels on Kindle Unlimited). One of the first on my list is Lose Well by comedian Chris Gethard, currently sitting untouched on my bedside table.”

Joel Luber, Assistant Managing Editor: “After somehow dramatically exceeding my 2016 goal of 120 books by reading an even 200, I’ve since set my goals to 150 books (missed by reading only 129 in 2017, currently on pace to read 152 in 2018), and I think I’ll go for that again next year.”

Laura Sell, Publicity and Advertising Manager: In 2018 I just barely missed my goal of reading 40 books (though shouldn’t two 800 page Outlander books count as four books?!) so I think I’ll try again to read 40 books. I also resolve to post full reviews and social media photos for any books I get for free (a nice perk of being a publicist).

Best Books of 2018

As 2018 wraps up, we are pleased to see our titles landing on Best of the Year lists.

Fred Moten’s trilogy, consent not to be a single being, ended up on two of Bookforum‘s best of 2018 contributors’ lists.  Maggie Nelson says, “You could say they’re essays about art, philosophy, blackness, and the refusal of social death, but I think of them more as a fractal universe forever inviting immersion and exploration, a living force now inhabiting my bookshelf.” And Jess Row writes, “This trilogy is one of the great intellectual adventures of our era.”

Quill & Quire put Dionne Brand’s The Blue Clerk on their year’s best list. “The Blue Clerk is The Blue Clerknothing less than a reckoning with the entirety of Brand’s poetic outlook and philosophy,” says editor Steven W. Beattie. (We have U.S. rights to The Blue Clerk; it is published by McClelland and Stewart in the rest of the world.)

In her 2018 gift ideas list, Andrea Kirsh of The Art Blog suggests Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool. Originally published in 2008, this catalog for Hendricks’s solo show at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University was recently brought back into print. Kirsh says the book is “as cool and classy as its subject.”

978-1-4780-0022-8Keith Harris writes about his favorite music books of the year in City Pages and selects Robert Christgau’s Is It Still Good to Ya? “Do you write about music? Read about music? Think about the stuff even a little?,” he writes. “Well even if you’ve never read a word Christgau has written—or, really, even if you’ve disagreed with every word of his you’ve read—he’s had an effect on how you write or read or think. . . . Buy two copies—one to throw angrily across the room, one as a reference.” Ken Tucker of NPR’s Fresh Air also puts Is It Still Good to Ya in his year’s best list, calling it “a treasure trove of the most incisive, witty pop music reviews and commentary ever committed to print.”  No Depression also listed Christgau’s book in their end of year round up.

Jezebel‘s Julianne Escobedo Shepherd chooses Imani Perry’s Vexy Thing.jpgVexy Thing as her favorite book of the year: “Vexy Thing recontextualizes feminism and patriarchy in an era when both terms have been systemically emptied by market forces; she reminds us that the patriarch is an institutional concept and reminds us of its insidiousness in our everyday life through a devastatingly sharp historical critique, necessarily centering black women as the locus of her conversation.”

Although the New York Times didn’t select any university press titles for it’s 100 Notable Books list, we were pleased to see editor Parul Sehgal mention reading one of our 2016 titles this year. She writes, “My most valuable discovery was the work of Christina Sharpe, a scholar of breathtaking range whose most recent book is In the Wake, about the aftershocks of chattel slavery in the Americas.”

We were also pleased to see our collaboration with MoMA, Modern Art in the Arab World, edited by Anneka Lenssen, Sarah Rogers and Nada Shabout, on Ursula Lindsey’s Notable Books of 2018 from and about the Arab World, in Al-Fanar Media. She says, “The book is a unique reference for students of modern Arab art and a fascinating window into cultural debates in the region.”

978-0-938989-42-4Another art book, Pop América, 1965–1975, edited by Esther Gabara, was chosen by Remezcla as one of the best Latino and Latin American history books of 2018. The bilingual catalogue for a traveling exhibition that will open at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University this winter, Pop América, 1965–1975 reveals the skill with which Latin American and Latino/a artists adapted familiar languages of mass media, fashion, and advertising to create experimental art in a startling range of mediums. Remezcla also selects Sounds of Crossing by Alex E. Chávez as a top book of 2018. Alejandra Oliva writes, ” He pulls in both history and current situations – and best of all, his own experiences as a Mexican academic and musician – to create a multidimensional, gorgeous book.”

The Advocate put three of our titles on their list of the best queer history and memoirs of 2018. They featured The Rest of It by Martin Duberman, My Butch Career by Esther Newton, and Me and My House: James Baldwin’s Last Decade in France by Magdalena J. Zaborowska.

McNally Jackson bookstore announced its 2018 staff favorites on Twitter. Staffer Gleb chose the tenth anniversary edition of Jasbir Puar’s classic Terrorist Assemblages as well as Alexander G. Weheliye’s 2014 book Habeas Viscus. Staffer Cam chose Fred Moten’s Black and Blur for his top ten of 2018. Chicago’s Seminary Co-op bookstore puts Now that the audience is assembled by David Grubbs on their Notable Books of 2018 list, as well as Imani Perry’s Vexy Thing and Me and My House: James Baldwin’s Last Decade in France by Magdalena J. Zaborowska.

Thanks to all these writers for including our titles on your year’s best lists!

 

 

Flash Sale: Save 50% for Two Days Only

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We’re excited to announce a 50% off flash sale on all in-stock books and journal issues. Now’s the time to pick up those titles you couldn’t fit in your suitcase at recent fall meetings or get some great gifts. But hurry, this sale lasts two days only, December 3 and 4. Hurry to our website now and use coupon code FLASH18 to save.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. And you can’t combine multiple orders to maximize the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (8-5 Eastern Time). Domestic orders placed during the sale will reach recipients by Christmas, but we cannot guarantee holiday delivery for international orders.

The two-day only sale ends Tuesday, December 4 at 11:59 Eastern Time. Start shopping now!

American Academy of Religion, 2018

Before the Thanksgiving holiday, we enjoyed catching up with authors and editors and selling books and journals at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Denver.

Spiritual CitizenshipWe were thrilled to feature two recent award-winning titles in the booth: Spiritual Citizenship by N. Fadeke Castor, which won the 2018 Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion; and Everyday Conversions by Attiya Ahmad, which won the 2018 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS) Book Award.

Last year’s winner of the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography, Lauren Pond, displayed some of her photographs during the conference, and gave an artist’s talk about her book, Test of Faith.

Monique Moultrie, author of Passionate and Pious, and Laura Grillo, author of An Intimate Rebuke, both stopped by the booth to say hello.

If you weren’t able to attend the conference, or if your luggage was too heavy for more great books, you can still save 30% on all our great religion titles on our website using coupon code AAR18, through the end of the year.

Give the Gift of Books

It’s Black Friday, but instead of heading to the mall, why don’t you simplify your life by giving books to everyone on your shopping list? We suggest a few great gift books below. They’re available for 30% off on our website with coupon code SAVE30, or head to your local independent bookstore tomorrow and #shoplocal on Small Business Saturday instead!

Baldwin_REV_jacket_frontWant to introduce a child in your life to James Baldwin? Pick up a copy of his only children’s book, Little Man, Little Man. Originally published in 1976 and quickly out of print, we have brought the book back in a beautiful new edition. School Library Journal calls it “a new classic.” Publishers Weekly says, “Through luminous prose and fine observation, readers come to care deeply about TJ and his friends, and they’ll wish their story didn’t end so soon.” Adults will also enjoy the story and the lovely illustrations by French watercolorist Yoran Cazac. Baldwin fans may also want to check out Me and My House: James Baldwin’s Last Decade in France by Magdalena J. Zaborowska. This richly illustrated book takes readers into Baldwin’s home and uses the space as a lens through which to expand his biography and explore the politics and poetics of blackness, queerness, and domesticity in his complex and underappreciated later works.

We have a number of suggestions for the poetry lovers in Gunslinger-50your life. Dionne Brand’s The Blue Clerk: Ars Poetica in 59 Versos will appeal to readers of Derek Walcott and Claudia Rankine. Through these essay poems, Brand explores memory, language, culture, and time while intimately interrogating the act and difficulty of writing, the relationship between the poet and the world, and the link between author and art. We also recommend Comfort Measures Only, a collection of selected poems by physician Rafael Campo. A&U Magazine calls it “a powerful collection of this masterful poet’s work,” and the Bay Area Reporter says, “Fans of Campo’s work will find much to savor in this treasury from a physician with his heart in all the right places.” This year we also released a special Fiftieth Anniversary Edition of Edward Dorn’s classic poem Gunslinger. In a new foreword Marjorie Perloff discusses Gunslinger‘s continued relevance to contemporary politics. This new edition also includes a critical essay by Michael Davidson and Charles Olson’s idiosyncratic “Bibliography on America for Ed Dorn,” which he wrote to provide guidance for Dorn’s study of, and writing about, the American West.

978-1-4780-0129-4If you’re interested in the history of gay and lesbian activism, check out two memoirs and a biography we put out this year. In Exile within Exiles, James N. Green examines the life of Herbert Daniel, a Brazilian activist for gay rights, feminism, and environmentalism, who fought for social justice both in Brazil and from exile in Europe from the mid-1960s until his death in 1992. Historian Martin Duberman was also an activist for LGBT rights, and his memoir The Rest of It chronicles a time in his life when he was both extremely productive in his scholarly and activist work while also suffering from depression, addiction, and other health problems. In My Butch Career, anthropologist Esther Newton tells her life story from childhood to age forty, when a lifetime of struggle against sexism and LBGT discrimination finally brought her professional success.

Got music lovers in your life? Why not give them Is It Still Good to Ya?, a collection of rock critic Robert Christgau’s best writing from his fifty-year career.  Kirkus Reviews writes, “At a moment when music criticism seems less empowered for being more fragmented, Christgau still offers an informed, authoritative perspective, self-aware regarding cultural aging and mortality, not stodgy but wry. A vital chronicler of rock’s story, several decades on.”

Someone to Talk ToTwo recent novels in translation would make great gifts for lovers of literature. Someone to Talk To is by one of China’s most respected novelists, Liu Zhenyun. Library Journal says, “”Dense with dozens of interwoven narratives of living through pre- and post-Mao China, Liu’s scathing and illuminating tome is highly recommended for internationally savvy fans of Mo Yan, Yu Hua, and Yan Lianke.” Or try a historical novel that still resonates today: Published in 1924 and widely acknowledged as a major work of twentieth-century Latin American literature, José Eustasio Rivera’s The Vortex follows the harrowing adventures of the young poet Arturo Cova and his lover Alicia as they flee Bogotá and head into the wild and woolly backcountry of Colombia. “Ironically, the environmentalist concerns he addressed are as timely as ever,” says Ilan Stavans.

We hope some of these great books will make it onto your holiday shopping list. Order by December 1 using coupon code SAVE30 and domestic orders will definitely make it to you before Christmas. Or head to your local bookstore and buy or order these great books from them.

 

 

American Anthropological Association, 2018

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Excited booth staffers after setting up!

It was wonderful to meet excited customers, sell books and journals, and celebrate our award-winning authors and editors at this year’s American Anthropological Association meeting in San José! Thanks to everyone who came by our booth to browse our stock or say hello.

Our anthropology titles were honored with more awards this year than every before! We are so excited to congratulate the following authors:

Check out our photo gallery of authors and editors:

 

Missed the conference? Not able to fit all the books you wanted into your luggage? You can still save on anthropology paperbacks through the end of the year—just use coupon code AAA18 at dukeupress.edu.

American Studies Association 2018

We enjoyed selling books and journals and meeting authors and editors at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Studies Association.

STX_134_prWe attended a launch party on Saturday for H̶e̶r̶e̶ and N̶o̶w̶: Under Erasure,” a special issue of Social Text (134). In both traditional and experimental prose, this special issue revisits the connection between depicting the world and making claims upon the human as self-narrating subject. At once advancing a critique of the present and recounting a process of writing out from under the emergency of the present, the essays propose to place the here and now under erasure. 

lisa-lowe-prize.jpgCongratulations to Lisa Lowe, author of The Intimacy of Four Continents, on winning the 2018 Carl Bode-Norman Holmes Pearson Prize. The award honors a scholar who has dedicated a lifetime of work to the mission and values of American studies. Lowe, a former president of the ASA, also won the Minority Scholars’ Committee Richard A. Yarborough Mentoring Award.

 

 

If you missed this year’s meeting, or if you didn’t have room in your luggage for all the books and journals you wanted to buy, you can still save 30% on our website with coupon code ASA2018, through the end of the year. Hope to see you next year!

How Partnerships with Museums Help Build a Strong Art List

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Welcome to the University Press Week blog tour! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP, offering posts that show how the university press community amplifies voices, disciplines, and communities. We’re pleased to be a part of Arts & Culture day with a post about how our partnerships with art museums amplify their work and help us build a strong art list. See the other great posts on the tour at the end of this post.

978-0-938989-42-4Duke University Press has long has a strong list in art and art history, and since the mid-2000s, that list has included a number of museum catalogs. Our earliest museum partner is the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Since they opened in 2005, we have distributed many catalogs for them, including Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool (2008), The Record (2010), Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey (2013), Southern Accent (2016), and most recently, Pop América, 1965–1975 (2018). The Nasher Museum’s mission to collect and display works by diverse artists who have been historically underrepresented, or even excluded, by mainstream arts institutions also fits with our own acquisition editors’ focus. “Duke Press has been a wonderful partner since the Nasher Museum opened in 2005,” said Sarah Schroth, Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans Director of the Nasher Museum. “The Duke Press team has provided invaluable help in distributing our exhibition catalogues to art museums, book fairs and book critics around the country.”

Modern Art in the Arab WorldWorking with the Nasher Museum helped us build a reputation as a strong distributor of museum catalogs. In 2010 we began a partnership with the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) to distribute their Primary Documents series. Although sometimes associated with an exhibition, these titles are not catalogs but instead teaching and researching tools featuring primary documents associated with a particular artist or region, that often have never been available in English. The first volume we distributed was Contemporary Chinese Art (2010), and more recently we have distributed Modern Art in the Arab World (2018) and Art and Theory of Post-1989 Central and Eastern Europe (2018). These titles are a good fit with our area studies lists as well as our art list, and we can use our expertise in course adoption marketing to help MoMA reach a wider teaching audience.

Michael McCullough, Senior Manager for Books Marketing and Sales, says, “Marketing, selling, and distributing books from major museums is very helpful in raising our profile with museum shops and art buyers. We only distribute books that complement our own books and journals publishing programs; so whether a distributed title came from MoMA or the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, it will look at home in the Duke University Press catalog.”

We Wanted a Revolution 2Recently we have undertaken collaborations with the Museum of Latin American Art  and the Chinese American Museum, with catalogs that were part of the Pacific Standard Time LA/LA collaboration. We were also excited to partner with the Brooklyn Museum on their exhibition We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85. We distributed a Sourcebook for the exhibition that features an array of rare and little-known documents from the period by artists, writers, cultural critics, and art historians as well as a second volume of New Perspectives, containing original essays and perspectives that place the exhibition’s works in both historical and contemporary contexts.

Begin to SeeCurator Julie J. Thomson, author of Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College, a catalog for her exhibition at the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center says, “After spending years researching an exhibition which is up for a limited time, the exhibition catalog reaches beyond who could visit the museum, and is what remains. Duke University Press’s distribution of the catalog for Begin to See allowed museum bookstores and art libraries to know about it and order it. It’s reassuring to know that future scholars will be able to access my research and writing through the catalog held in library collections throughout the world.”

Editorial Director Ken Wissoker agrees that publishing catalogs is useful for acquisitions. “Whether it is the Black feminist show We Wanted a Revolution from the Brooklyn Museum or The Record from the Nasher Museum, museum catalogs are a crucial part of our list, even beyond the areas in the arts where one expects them to contribute.  We have authors writing for the catalogs and others bringing their books to us because they loved the catalogs on our list. This is a great crossover moment between art and critical thinking, and the catalogs could not play a more important role in that exchange.”

Please continue on the University Press Week blog tour by visiting these other great university press offerings: Athabasca University Press offers a playlist by author Mark A. McCutcheon of all the songs featured in his book The Medium Is the Monster: Canadian Adaptations of Frankenstein and the Discourse of Technology. Rutgers University Press dedicates a post to our their book Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts by Judith Brodsky and Ferris Olin. Over at Yale University Press, check out a post by author Dominic Bradbury about how immigrants enrich a country’s art and architecture. University of Minnesota Press is running a post about their author Adrienne Kennedy, who will be inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame on Nov. 12th. Hope you enjoy all these great #TurnItUP posts! 

Preview our Spring 2019 Catalog

S19-catalog-front-coverOur Spring 2019 catalog is here! Check out some highlights below and download the complete catalog for a more in-depth look. These titles will be published between January and June 2019.

The cover of the catalog is a photograph by Rotimi Fani-Kayode, the subject of the book Bloodflowers: Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Photography, and the 1980s (March) by W. Ian Bourland. Bloodflowers launches a new series, The Visual Arts of Africa and its Diasporas, edited by Kellie Jones and Steven Nelson. And it’s just one of many great new art titles in this catalog. You’ll also want to check out Suzanne Preston Blier’s Picasso’s Demoiselles (June), an examination of the previously unknown origins of a well-known painting. And in Surrealism at Play (February) Susan Laxton writes a new history of Surrealism in which she traces the centrality of play to the movement and its ongoing legacy. We’re especially excited about The Romare Bearden Reader (May) edited by Robert G. O’Meally. It brings together a collection of new essays and canonical writings by novelists, poets, historians, critics, and playwrights. The contributors include Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, August Wilson, Farah Jasmine Griffin, and Kobena Mercer. We’ve also got Rebecca Zorach’s Art for People’s Sake (March), which looks at the Black Arts Movement in Chicago; and Chicano and Chicana Art: A Critical Anthology  (February), which provides an overview of the history and theory of Chicano/a art from the 1960s to the present.

Deported AmericansTimely books on immigration will definitely add context to current debates. In Deported Americans (April), legal scholar and former public defender Beth C. Caldwell tells the story of dozens of immigrants who were deported from the United States—the only country they have ever known—to Mexico, tracking the harmful consequences of deportation for those on both sides of the border. And in The Fixer (June), Charles Piot follows a visa broker—known as a “fixer”—in the West African nation of Togo as he helps his clients apply for the U.S. Diversity Visa Lottery program. For a look at the immigrant experience through poetry, check out The Chasers (May), in which Renato Rosaldo shares his experiences and those of his group of twelve Mexican-American Tucson High School friends known as the Chasers as they grew up, graduated, and fell out of touch. Rosaldo’s poems present a chorus of distinct voices and perspectives that convey the realities of Chicano life on the borderlands from the 1950s to the present.

The Hundreds by Lauren Berlant and Kathleen Stewart will delight fans of theory, ethnography, and experimental writing alike. The book, composed of pieces one hundred or multiples of one hundred words long—is their collaborative experimental writing project in which they strive toward sensing and capturing the resonances that operate at the ordinary level of everyday experience.

Activists will be excited to learn that we are bringing out a new, revised and expanded edition of Aurora Levins Morales’s Medicine Stories (April). She weaves together the insights and lessons learned over a lifetime of activism to offer a new theory of social justice, bringing clarity and hope to tangled, emotionally charged social issues in beautiful and accessible language.

Book ReportsIf you enjoy critic Robert Christgau’s writing on music (his collection Is It Still Good to Ya? came out this fall), you’ll definitely want to check out his book reviews, collected together in Book Reports (April). Christgau shows readers a different side to his esteemed career with reviews of books ranging from musical autobiographies, criticism, and histories to novels, literary memoirs, and cultural theory.

We’re also pleased to present new books from returning authors Jane Gallop, Elspeth Brown, Jennifer C. Nash, and Kandice Chuh, among others, as well as a new edition of The Cuba Reader, long a bestseller for courses and travelers.

These are just a few of the great titles coming out next spring. We have over seventy titles in cultural studies, art, sound studies, Latin American studies, history, Asian studies, African studies, religion, American studies, and more. You’ll want to read and download the whole thing to see all the great new books and journals. To be notified of new books in your chosen disciplines, sign up for our email alerts, too.

 

 

Join Us for an Open House on November 15

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To celebrate University Press Week, we are delighted to invite friends, fans, and colleagues to join us at our first-ever Open House on November 15 from 3-5 p.m.

Explore the Duke University Press library as you enjoy book displays and refreshments, meet staff, and enter a raffle featuring a tote bag full of new books and journals.

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Win this tote bag full of books, journals, and swag!

University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society. In addition to our Open House, look for displays of our books and journals around campus and read special posts on our blog that week.

Duke students, faculty, staff, and members of the community are welcome!

We are located in Brightleaf Square’s North Building at 905 West Main Street. Enter from the courtyard at the door between the empty restaurant and the craft store. Head up the stairs and turn left. The library is down the hall on the left.

Free parking is available at the Brightleaf Square gated lot at Gregson and Main Streets, on the side of Morgan Imports. Bring your parking ticket to the open house for validation. We look forward to meeting you!

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