Author: Laura Sell

Publicity and Advertising Manager, Duke University Press

Final Day of Our E-Book Sale

 

EbookSale_Feb-March2019_EmailList_REV

Today is the final day of our e-book sale. Through today all e-books on our content site are only $4.99. Tomorrow they will cost the same as the paperback price (usually between $25 and $30).

Hurry over to the site now and purchase as many e-books as you’d like at this special price! Please revisit our announcement of the sale for purchase instructions, or see our FAQs.

If you have problems or questions about your order, please contact our customer service team at orders@dukeupress.edu or 919-688-5134.

Remembering Carolee Schneemann

We are sorry to learn of the death of feminist artist Carolee Schneemann, best known for her performance pieces Meat Joy and Interior Scroll. Several of our books feature or engage with Schneemann’s innovative and influential work.

978-0-8223-4511-4_prIn 2010 we published Correspondence Course: An Epistolary History of Carolee Schneemann and Her Circle, edited by Duke University Professor of Art Kristine Stiles. The book collects correspondence between Schneemann and those she called “her tribe,” including composer James Tenney, the filmmaker Stan Brakhage, the artist Dick Higgins, the dancer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer, the poet Clayton Eshleman, and the psychiatrist Joseph Berke.

Our 2000 book M/E/A/N/I/N/G: An Anthology of Artists’ Writings, Theory, and Criticism features an interview with Schneemann by Aviva Rahmani. In the interview, about the censorship of her work, Shneemann says, “My work within erotic and political taboos has been fueled by the constraints of sexism, but my work has offended both men and women, and been defended by both women and men; my work has offended granting agencies and institutions, and been supported by granting agencies and institutions. I like the margins to slip on . . . the uncertainty. From the margins I’ve been free to attack, to sniff out the leaking repressions and denial of subordination.”

The 2007 collection Women’s Experimental Cinema contains an article by M.M. Serra and Kathryn Ramey entitled “Eye/Body: The Cinematic Paintings of Carolee Schneemann,” which begins with a quote from Schneemann: “I’m still a painter and I will always be in essence a painter. . . . Painting doesn’t have to mean that you’re holding a brush in your hand. It might or it might not. It might be a camera. It might be a microphone. It might be your own body that when you go inside the frame and when you adjust your focus you see that the materiality of what you’re working with might include yourself in a force
field.” The authors analyze Schneeman’s use of her own body in her art. They conclude, “Carolee Schneemann persistently enacts the ‘eye/body,’ the seeing, active artist agent and continues to make work that challenges convention and expands our understanding of what painting, performance, and film are or can be.”

Kristine Stiles says, “Carolee Schneemann’s legacy will remain vibrant in her consummately original work. It was a privilege to be her friend for some forty years, however tumultuous. I will miss our regular Sunday telephone calls, her brilliant mind, lively sense of humor, and intrepid devotion to art.”  We join Stiles in mourning this important artist.

Introducing Our New Website

New-website-blog

We are excited to launch our new, completely redesigned website today. The improved site is the result of a huge amount of work by nearly everyone at the Press, and we hope you will find it easy to use.

Some of the new features on the site include:

  • A new mobile friendly design
  • A redesigned and more intuitive site structure
  • An improved customer ecommerce experience
  • Multi-tiered subject categories so you can more easily find titles in your discipline
  • Spotlights on emerging trends in what we publish
  • Easy-to-find new releases, best sellers, and award winners, as well as news and events.

Because our users’ information is secure and encrypted, we are unable to carry over our customers’ login and password data. All customers will need to create a new account on the site before being able to purchase titles or renew subscriptions.

To create a new account, go to: www.dukeupress.edu/register-new-account

  • Enter your first name, last name, and email address and choose a password.
  • Click “register” when your information is entered.

Capture2

  • The next page will be the “my account” page. Your account has been created.

my account

  • You will receive an email shortly confirming your account registration and account login.

If you are having difficulty creating an account of if you have any questions, please contact our customer service department via email at orders@dukeupress.edu or via phone at 888-651-0122 (US toll free) or +1-919-688-5134 (international).

 

E-Book Sale! All E-Books $4.99

EbookSale_Feb-March2019_EmailList_updated

We are excited to announce that we are launching e-book sales on our content site, read.dukeupress.edu. To celebrate, all e-books are only $4.99 until March 21, 2019.

To purchase a book, browse or search at our content site, choose your book, and click on the blue Buy This Book button. After you’ve added the book to your cart, you can continue shopping by clicking on Back to site.  Once you’ve selected all your e-books, please create an account if you do not already have one. Please note that if you have purchased print books or journal subscriptions from our dukeupress.edu e-commerce site, that is a different account and you will need to create a new one for our content site.

After you complete the check out process, you will receive an email containing a link to download a PDF of the book. The PDF is yours to keep and print if you’d like, but not to share with others or use for commercial purposes. If you lose the file, you can return to our site and download the book again. Please note that e-books are non-returnable.

If you don’t see the option to purchase an e-book, it’s likely because your institution’s library subscribes to our e-book collection. Books you have access to through your institution will feature a green check mark by the title. Download the chapters you want at no charge and thank your librarian for subscribing!

This special offer ends March 21, 2019. After that date, e-books will still be available for purchase on our content site but will cost the same as the paperback edition (usually between $24.95 and $29.95).

If you have problems or questions about your order, please contact our customer service team at orders@dukeupress.edu or 919-688-5134.

Hurry now and stock up on as many e-books as you’d like for only $4.99 each!

Sample The Hundreds by Lauren Berlant and Kathleen Stewart

The HundredsThe Hundreds—composed of pieces one hundred or multiples of one hundred words long—is theorist Lauren Berlant and ethnographer Kathleen Stewart’s collaborative experimental writing project in which they strive toward sensing and capturing the resonances that operate at the ordinary level of everyday experience. We invite you to sample the book by reading four pieces from it.

First Things

Every day a friend across the ocean wakes up to suicidal thoughts. Another friend takes a drink to eat clean and another eats a candy bar in bed before washing the sheets, doing laundry naked to ensure soft sleeps.
Another friend chants before going out to her analogy lab. Another hires
retired people to walk her dogs so that she can get to her trainer. Others,
desperate, rush harsh. Many people’s kids climb in. Many pets assert the
dominion of their drives. There’s stretching and the taking of medicine.
There’s accounting and anxious text checking. There’s scanning for bossy
emails and preconceptions. Lists get made. For some, there is breakfast.
Once spring rolls around there is running before the heat and catching
the first shift sitting outside the punk bakery to smoke, drink coffee, and
“break each other’s balls” before work does what work does. I asked them
about this phrase once and sparked a debate about whether it is properly
“break” or “bust.” Whatever, Professor, they laughed, yanking your chain,
busting your balls, don’t take it so serious!

Some people sleep in. Other people wake at the sun. Some people walk
into the house and see only the order in it. Some people serve other
people. Some use the quiet time to do the best things quiet time allows.
Some people waste it, which is not the opposite of using it well. When
I was little I had a task: to make coffee for the adults, measuring out the
Maxwell House, setting the breakfast table. Then I’d leave for school and
my early teachers would let me into the teachers’ lounge. A little troll
doll kid overhearing Allende, Planned Parenthood, and MLK. A confused
and sunny face taking in the voices and the concept of concepts, before
the day.

(Davis 2010; Eigen 2004; Hejinian [1980] 2002; Jacobus 1995; Perec [1974] 2008)

Swells

We write to what’s becoming palpable in sidelong looks or a consistency
of rhythm or tone. Not to drag things back to the land of the little judges
but to push the slow-mo button, to wait for what’s starting up, to listen up
for what’s wearing out. We’re tripwired by a tendency dilating. We make
a pass at a swell in realism, and look for the hook. We back up at the hint
of something. We butt in. We try to describe the smell; we trim the fat to
pinpoint what seems to be the matter here.

Words sediment next to something laid low, or they detour on a crazed
thought-cell taking off. I saw a woman standing on a sidewalk, chainsmoking
while she talked to a buff younger man. She was trying to get
him to give someone else a break because he means well or he didn’t
mean it. Maybe her son. “He don’t know no better.” She was hanging in
there, but the whole top half of her black hair was a helmet of white roots.
She was using her fast-thinking superpowers to run a gauntlet of phrases
and get out quick even though we all knew she was just buying time.
A thought hits at an angle. Subjects are surprised by their own acts. But
everyone knows a composition when they see one. A scene can become
a thing after only a few repetitions. At the Walmart in New Hampshire,
scruffy middle-aged men hang back at the register, letting their elderly
mothers pay. The men have a hint of sour and the abject; their mothers
are a worn autopilot. Women talk in the aisles about the local hospital; it’s
incapable; it misreads people, handing out exactly the wrong, killer drug.

(Ericson 2011; Sedgwick 1997; Seigworth and Tiessen 2012; Serres 1997;
Stevens [1957] 1990)

Dilations

The Hundreds is an experiment in keeping up with what’s going on.
Ordinaries appear through encounters with the world, but encounters
are not events of knowing, units of anything, revelations of realness, or
facts. Sometimes they stage a high-intensity tableau of the way things
are or could become; sometimes strangeness raises some dust. This work
induces form without relieving the pressure of form. It pushes and follows
histories out. It takes in signs and scaffolds. If our way is to notice
relations and varieties of impact, we’re neither stuffing our pockets with
ontology nor denying it: attention and riffing sustain our heuristics.
What draws affect into form is a matter of concern. Form, though, is not
the same thing as shape: and a concept extends via the tack words take.
Amplified description gets at some quality that sticks like a primary object,
a bomb or a floater. The image that comes to mind when you read
that (if images come to mind when you read) might not be what we’re
imagining — and we’re likely not imagining the same thing either. Collaboration
is a meeting of minds that don’t match. Circulation disturbs
and creates what’s continuous, anchoring you enough in the scene to pull
in other things as you go.

“Punctum” ought to mean whatever grabs you into an elsewhere of form.
There ought also to be a word like “animum,” meaning what makes an
impact so live that its very action shifts around the qualities of things
that have and haven’t yet been encountered. You can never know what
is forgotten or remembered. Even dormancy is a kind of action in relation.
Think about watching a dead thing, a thing sleeping, or these words.
Think about skimming as a hunger and defense against hunger. Think
about the physiological pressure of itching.

(Barthes [1980] 1981; Deleuze [1988] 1993; Freud [1925] 1961; Goffman 1981;
Massumi 2010; Moten 2013; Nersessian and Kramnick 2017; Posmentier 2017;
Shaviro 2016)

This is vanilla

These prose poems come from a long poetic and noetic collaboration.
The project pays attention to the relation of scenes to form, observation
to implication, encounters to events, and figuration to what sticks in the
mind. To convert an impact into a scene, to prehend objects as movement
and matter, retains a scene’s status as life in suspension, the way an extract
in cooking conveys the active element in a concentrated substance
that comes in a small brown bottle. (This is vanilla. This is almond.) The
elaboration of heuristic form on the move points to pattern, patina, atmosphere:
the object world of vestiges that scatters bumpily across the
plane of what is also a vibrant tableau. But we get it: your eyes want a
place to land on. You want to know what happened when the glances
passed or where the train of a dark sentence will go. At different speeds
we move around the effects, causes, and situational membranes. As we
proceed we sift figurative types and object relations, seeking out the gists
of things. Our styles move in proximity to currents. We get distracted
sometimes. This is a practice of tightening and loosening the object-scene
in hundred-word swatches.

(B. Anderson 2009; Diaconu 2006; Fonagy and Target 2007; Ingold 2015;
Manning 2009; Massumi 2010; Quick 1998)

Lauren Berlant is George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor of English at the University of Chicago. She is author of Cruel Optimism and The Female Complaint, both also published by Duke University Press. Kathleen Stewart is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Texas, Austin, and author of Ordinary Affects, also published by Duke University Press.

Order The Hundreds for 30% off on our website using coupon code E19100S.

Intersectional Before It Was Cool: A Guest Post by Kristen Ghodsee

Kristen Ghodsee 2017 BW (1)Today’s guest post is by Kristen Ghodsee, author, most recently, of Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War, out this month.

Four years before Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw’s seminal 1989 paper, “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics,” African women were fighting to have a discussion of apartheid included on the program of the United Nations Third World Conference on Women to be held in Nairobi in the summer of 1985. Ever since the First World Conference on Women held in Mexico City a decade earlier, liberal feminists from the United States had insisted that a women’s conference should only discuss the status of women. Other topics not relevant to the promotion of gender equality, they argued, should be discussed (by the men) in the General Assembly. In response, women from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, together with their allies from the state socialist countries of Eastern Europe and Cuba, protested that a women’s conference should allow women the chance to speak about all global concerns, regardless of whether they were specifically “women’s issues.”

For their part, the Americans in the official delegation considered the discussion of topics like apartheid or the need for a New International Economic Order (NIEO) an unnecessary “politicization” of the meetings. Directives from the Department of State and the U.S. House of Representatives admonished the official American delegates to the women’s conferences to narrowly focus on “women’s issues.” In response, the women of the Second and Third Worlds argued that you could not separate “women’s issues” from issues of racism, colonialism, and neo-colonialism. What was the point, the African women asked, of discussing women’s rights in South Africa when the category of “woman” was so obviously divided by race? What was the point, the East European women queried, of discussing women’s rights in societies divided into classes of oppressors and oppressed?

978-1-4780-0181-2Although they did not have a name for their shared perspective, those women in the Global South and the state socialist East who believed that you could not discuss the issues of gender independently from issues of race and class were in fact promoting a kind of proto-intersectionality, one fiercely resisted by representatives from the First World countries. In Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity During the Cold War, I trace the important alliances between socialist and socialist-leaning women in Bulgaria and Zambia and their impacts on the shape of the global women’s movement during the United Nations International Women’s Year (1975) and the subsequent United Nations Decade for Women (1976-1985). I argue that the story of the international coalition of women who advocated for stronger states and larger social safety nets (supported by the public ownership of industry) is one that has been erased by the Western feminist historiography of this era. This political solidarity of non-Western women provided an important challenge to liberal feminism on the world stage, and in many respects, the Cold War competition between the West and the East/South over which economic system could best promote women’s rights proved an important catalyst for rapid social progress.

In her intellectual history of women and the United Nations, the Indian economist Devaki Jain lamented the loss of the Cold War context because with its demise she believed that women of the Global South lost their ability to forge paths independent of Western economic and political hegemony: “The fading out of the Cold War . . . removed a vital political umbrella that had sheltered the women of the South, given them a legitimacy to stake a claim for justice as part of the movements to address domination” (Jain 84). Jain clearly acknowledged the important role of the solidarity between women the state socialist East and women from the Global South: “The Socialist bloc had supported approaches that required a strong state, a thrust toward public provision of basic services, and a more equitable global economic program such as the New International Economic Order. It was often an ally of the newly liberated states as they attempted to forge coalitions . . . to negotiate with their former colonial masters” (Jain 103). The liberal feminists in the United States and Western Europe had access to financial resources that far exceeded those of the women’s activists in the rest of the world, but I argue that the rest of the world’s women forged coalitions that gave them strength in numbers.

Although there is no doubt that larger geopolitical concerns informed these ongoing relationships (the Eastern Bloc countries were always trying to score moral points against the United States and its allies), I argue that the women affiliated with this global leftist women’s movement truly believed in the idea of proto-intersectionality and that issues of gender equality could not (and should not) ever be separated from the larger political contexts within which women lived. The records of the debates at the United Nations as well as countless international publications produced and circulated during the International Women’s Year and the International Women’s Decade clearly show us today that non-Western socialist women were intersectional ­­– before it was cool.

Kristen Ghodsee is Professor of Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.  She is the author of five books with Duke University Press. You can save 30% on her most recent title, Second World, Second Sex, on our website using coupon code E19SWSS.

Reading Resolutions from Our Staff

Happy New Year! In 2019, why not make your resolutions literary? Our staff share their reading resolutions for the coming year. What are yours? Let us know in the comments!

Maria Volpe, Assistant to the Director:  “My book resolutions are to read three books published by Duke University Press, and to find a book that my two boys will look forward to reading with me every night!”

Nancy Sampson, Production Coordinator: “This year I realized that screen-based entertainment had taken over my leisure time and I hadn’t been reading as many books as I used to. I set a goal to read eight books in 2018 and surpassed it. My tactic was to read every other night instead of automatically going to social media, news, or playing games. I intend to set a higher goal for 2019 and look forward to getting back to one of my favorite pastimes.”

norse godsKatja Moos, Digital Collections Sales Manager: “I would like to read more books on ancient history and world mythology. Norse mythology, Greek gods and goddesses, rise and fall of the Roman Empire, the Silk Road, the Age of Exploration, and the Mayans are all fascinating to me. How did ancient cultures shape our world today?”

Kasia Repeta, Digital Marketing Coordinator: “Korean ancient legends, Korean pottery, Korean migration, Korean pop… This year I am going to take a journey to the Korean Peninsula through its literature. My dearest friend from South Korea recommended to me her favorite contemporary South Korean novelists, Ji-Young Gong and Young-ha Kim, with works translated into English.”

lose wellAmy Walter, Production Coordinator: “I have a two-part reading resolution this year. The first is to read more old fashioned print books (don’t tell anyone, but I may be spending too much time reading romance novels on Kindle Unlimited). One of the first on my list is Lose Well by comedian Chris Gethard, currently sitting untouched on my bedside table.”

Joel Luber, Assistant Managing Editor: “After somehow dramatically exceeding my 2016 goal of 120 books by reading an even 200, I’ve since set my goals to 150 books (missed by reading only 129 in 2017, currently on pace to read 152 in 2018), and I think I’ll go for that again next year.”

Laura Sell, Publicity and Advertising Manager: In 2018 I just barely missed my goal of reading 40 books (though shouldn’t two 800 page Outlander books count as four books?!) so I think I’ll try again to read 40 books. I also resolve to post full reviews and social media photos for any books I get for free (a nice perk of being a publicist).

Best Books of 2018

As 2018 wraps up, we are pleased to see our titles landing on Best of the Year lists.

Fred Moten’s trilogy, consent not to be a single being, ended up on two of Bookforum‘s best of 2018 contributors’ lists.  Maggie Nelson says, “You could say they’re essays about art, philosophy, blackness, and the refusal of social death, but I think of them more as a fractal universe forever inviting immersion and exploration, a living force now inhabiting my bookshelf.” And Jess Row writes, “This trilogy is one of the great intellectual adventures of our era.”

Quill & Quire put Dionne Brand’s The Blue Clerk on their year’s best list. “The Blue Clerk is The Blue Clerknothing less than a reckoning with the entirety of Brand’s poetic outlook and philosophy,” says editor Steven W. Beattie. (We have U.S. rights to The Blue Clerk; it is published by McClelland and Stewart in the rest of the world.)

In her 2018 gift ideas list, Andrea Kirsh of The Art Blog suggests Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool. Originally published in 2008, this catalog for Hendricks’s solo show at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University was recently brought back into print. Kirsh says the book is “as cool and classy as its subject.”

978-1-4780-0022-8Keith Harris writes about his favorite music books of the year in City Pages and selects Robert Christgau’s Is It Still Good to Ya? “Do you write about music? Read about music? Think about the stuff even a little?,” he writes. “Well even if you’ve never read a word Christgau has written—or, really, even if you’ve disagreed with every word of his you’ve read—he’s had an effect on how you write or read or think. . . . Buy two copies—one to throw angrily across the room, one as a reference.” Ken Tucker of NPR’s Fresh Air also puts Is It Still Good to Ya in his year’s best list, calling it “a treasure trove of the most incisive, witty pop music reviews and commentary ever committed to print.”  No Depression also listed Christgau’s book in their end of year round up.

Jezebel‘s Julianne Escobedo Shepherd chooses Imani Perry’s Vexy Thing.jpgVexy Thing as her favorite book of the year: “Vexy Thing recontextualizes feminism and patriarchy in an era when both terms have been systemically emptied by market forces; she reminds us that the patriarch is an institutional concept and reminds us of its insidiousness in our everyday life through a devastatingly sharp historical critique, necessarily centering black women as the locus of her conversation.”

Although the New York Times didn’t select any university press titles for it’s 100 Notable Books list, we were pleased to see editor Parul Sehgal mention reading one of our 2016 titles this year. She writes, “My most valuable discovery was the work of Christina Sharpe, a scholar of breathtaking range whose most recent book is In the Wake, about the aftershocks of chattel slavery in the Americas.”

We were also pleased to see our collaboration with MoMA, Modern Art in the Arab World, edited by Anneka Lenssen, Sarah Rogers and Nada Shabout, on Ursula Lindsey’s Notable Books of 2018 from and about the Arab World, in Al-Fanar Media. She says, “The book is a unique reference for students of modern Arab art and a fascinating window into cultural debates in the region.”

978-0-938989-42-4Another art book, Pop América, 1965–1975, edited by Esther Gabara, was chosen by Remezcla as one of the best Latino and Latin American history books of 2018. The bilingual catalogue for a traveling exhibition that will open at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University this winter, Pop América, 1965–1975 reveals the skill with which Latin American and Latino/a artists adapted familiar languages of mass media, fashion, and advertising to create experimental art in a startling range of mediums. Remezcla also selects Sounds of Crossing by Alex E. Chávez as a top book of 2018. Alejandra Oliva writes, ” He pulls in both history and current situations – and best of all, his own experiences as a Mexican academic and musician – to create a multidimensional, gorgeous book.”

The Advocate put three of our titles on their list of the best queer history and memoirs of 2018. They featured The Rest of It by Martin Duberman, My Butch Career by Esther Newton, and Me and My House: James Baldwin’s Last Decade in France by Magdalena J. Zaborowska.

McNally Jackson bookstore announced its 2018 staff favorites on Twitter. Staffer Gleb chose the tenth anniversary edition of Jasbir Puar’s classic Terrorist Assemblages as well as Alexander G. Weheliye’s 2014 book Habeas Viscus. Staffer Cam chose Fred Moten’s Black and Blur for his top ten of 2018. Chicago’s Seminary Co-op bookstore puts Now that the audience is assembled by David Grubbs on their Notable Books of 2018 list, as well as Imani Perry’s Vexy Thing and Me and My House: James Baldwin’s Last Decade in France by Magdalena J. Zaborowska.

Thanks to all these writers for including our titles on your year’s best lists!

 

 

Flash Sale: Save 50% for Two Days Only

FLASH50_SaleDecSale2017_600x200

We’re excited to announce a 50% off flash sale on all in-stock books and journal issues. Now’s the time to pick up those titles you couldn’t fit in your suitcase at recent fall meetings or get some great gifts. But hurry, this sale lasts two days only, December 3 and 4. Hurry to our website now and use coupon code FLASH18 to save.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. And you can’t combine multiple orders to maximize the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (8-5 Eastern Time). Domestic orders placed during the sale will reach recipients by Christmas, but we cannot guarantee holiday delivery for international orders.

The two-day only sale ends Tuesday, December 4 at 11:59 Eastern Time. Start shopping now!

American Academy of Religion, 2018

Before the Thanksgiving holiday, we enjoyed catching up with authors and editors and selling books and journals at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Denver.

Spiritual CitizenshipWe were thrilled to feature two recent award-winning titles in the booth: Spiritual Citizenship by N. Fadeke Castor, which won the 2018 Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion; and Everyday Conversions by Attiya Ahmad, which won the 2018 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS) Book Award.

Last year’s winner of the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography, Lauren Pond, displayed some of her photographs during the conference, and gave an artist’s talk about her book, Test of Faith.

Monique Moultrie, author of Passionate and Pious, and Laura Grillo, author of An Intimate Rebuke, both stopped by the booth to say hello.

If you weren’t able to attend the conference, or if your luggage was too heavy for more great books, you can still save 30% on all our great religion titles on our website using coupon code AAR18, through the end of the year.