Author: Laura Sell

Publicity and Advertising Manager, Duke University Press

Introducing Our Fall 2017 Catalog

Our Fall 2017 catalog is here! We’re excited to give you a preview of all the great books that will be available in the next few months.

Test of FaithEvery two years we publish the winner of the Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize. The 2017 winner is Lauren Pond and her photos of Pentecostal serpent handlers in Appalachia. Test of Faith: Signs, Serpents, Salvation features 100 color photographs and provides a deeply nuanced, personal look at serpent handling that invites greater understanding of a religious practice that has long faced derision and criticism. It will be available in November.

Louise Thompson PattersonWe have a great cluster of general interest titles on the struggle for social and racial justice. Keith Gilyard has written the first biography of Louise Thompson Patterson, a leading and transformative figure in the radical African American politics of the twentieth century. In Why the Vote Wasn’t Enough for Selma, Karlyn Forner rewrites the heralded history of Selma to show why gaining the right to vote did not lead to economic justice for African Americans in the Alabama Black Belt. Jane Lazarre tells the story of her father Bill Lazarre in The Communist and the Communist’s Daughter. He was a radical activist who, as part of his tireless efforts to create a better world for his family, held leadership positions in the American Communist Party, fought in the Spanish Civil War, and organized labor unions. And bringing the story of activism into the twenty-first century, Howard E. Covington Jr.’s Lending Power looks at the compelling story of the nonprofit Center for Community Self-Help, a community-oriented and civil rights-based financial institution that has helped provide loans to those who lacked access to traditional financing while fighting for consumer protection for all Americans.

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Fred Moten

We’re excited to feature a number of returning authors with major new theoretical interventions into contemporary politics and cultural studies. Black and Blur is the first book in Fred Moten’s trilogy consent not to be a single being. Moten engages in a capacious consideration of the place and force of blackness in African diaspora arts, politics, and life. Jasbir Puar returns to our list both with a tenth-anniversary edition of her classic Terrorist Assemblages and with The Right to Maim, which continues her pathbreaking work on the liberal state, sexuality, and biopolitics to theorize the production of disability, using Israel’s occupation of Palestine as an example of how settler colonial states rely on liberal frameworks of disability to maintain control of bodies and populations.

In Saving the Security State, Inderpal Grewal traces the changing relations between the US state and its citizens in an era she calls advanced neoliberalism, under which everyday life is militarized, humanitarianism serves imperial aims, and white Christian men become exceptional citizens tasked with protecting the nation from racialized others. Also looking at life in the modern security state is the collection Life in the Age of Drone Warfare, edited by Lisa Parks and Caren Kaplan. We are also publishing Kaplan’s book Aerial Aftermaths, which looks at the cultural history of aerial imagery—from the first vistas provided by balloons in the eighteenth century to the sensing operations of military drones. In Attachments to War, Jennifer Terry traces how biomedical logics entangle Americans in a perpetual state of war, in which new forms of wounding necessitate the continual development of treatment and prosthetic technologies while the military justifies violence and military occupation as necessary conditions for advancing medical knowledge. And reckoning with one’s role in perpetuating systematic inequality is the theme of Bruce Robbins’s The Beneficiary, in which he examines the implications of a humanitarianism in which the prosperous are the both the cause and the beneficiaries of the abhorrent conditions they seek to remedy.

art1New books in gender studies and queer studies include Lynn Comella’s Vibrator Nation, which tells the fascinating history of how feminist sex-toy stores such as Eve’s Garden, Good Vibrations and Babeland raised sexual consciousness, redefined the adult industry, provided educational and community resources, and changed the way sex was talked about, had, and enjoyed. We’ve also got Eric Plemons’s ethnography of trans-medicine; Melanie Yergeau’s Authoring Autism, which shows how autistics both embrace and reject the rhetorical, thereby queering the lines of rhetoric, humanity, agency, and the very essence of rhetoric itself; and Lori Jo Marso’s Politics with Beauvoir, which treats Simone de Beauvoir’s feminist theory and practice as part of her political theory.

We’ve got many terrific anthropology titles, including Richard Price and Sally Price Saamaka Dreamingrevisiting their early careers in Suriname in Saamaka Dreaming; Kristen Ghodsee continuing her reflections on the legacies of communism in Eastern Europe; Edward LiPuma’s The Social Life of Financial Derivatives; Paul Rabinow thinking about Gerhard Richter and the idea of the contemporary; Dana Powell‘s look at the politics of energy in the Navajo Nation; and many more.

We also have titles in music, political theory, Asian Studies, religious studies, Latin American studies, history, science studies, and literary studies. We are also pleased to welcome Qui Parle to our collection of journals. Check out the full catalog to see all the new titles, preview special issues, and learn about all our journals. And sign up for our email alerts so you’ll know when all these great new books are published this fall.

Final Days of the Spring Sale

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We are down to the final two days of our big Spring Sale. It ends at 11:59 pm Eastern time tomorrow, Wednesday, May 11. So head to our website now to stock up and save on all in-stock books and journal issues.

During this sale, the more you buy, the more you save. Buy one or two titles and save 30%, buy three or four titles and save 40%, and buy five or more and get the best discount of 50%. Please note that journal subscriptions and society memberships are not included in the sale. See all the fine print here.

978-0-8223-6224-1_borderWe regret that one of our most popular titles, Staying with the Trouble by Donna Haraway, went out of stock at the beginning of the sale. A reprint is at the printer now and we hope to have it in stock again the week of May 15th. For those who were unable to order the book, we are pleased to offer a special 50% discount code on Staying with the Trouble once it is back in stock. Please return to the site next week and use coupon code STAY50 to take advantage of it. This special offer will expire May 31, 2017.

Okay, now get shopping. Only two days left!

Our Spring Sale Continues until May 10

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Have you shopped our spring sale yet? It continues until May 10. The more you buy, the more you save, with discounts of up to 50% when you buy five or more titles. The sale includes all in-stock books and journal issues but not subscriptions or society memberships. Just use coupon code SUMMER17 at checkout. Want recommendations? Check out Editorial Director Ken Wissoker’s top picks on Facebook. See all the fine print here.

Stock up and Save on Latin American Studies Titles

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The annual meeting of the Latin American Studies Association begins tomorrow in Lima, Peru. Because of the distance, this year we will have books and journals on display at the congress but attendees will not be able to purchase them there. Fortunately, we are having a great sale that includes all our in-stock Latin American studies titles and we encourage both attendees and those who weren’t able to make it this year to take advantage of the discounts.

Head to our website and save 30% (our regular conference discount) on one or two books or journal issues, 40% on three or four titles, and 50% on five or more copies. Just enter coupon code SUMMER17 at checkout.

978-0-8223-6348-4_prNew Latin American studies titles include The Lima Reader: History, Culture, Politics, the latest in our Latin America Readers series. Covering more than 500 years of history, culture, and politics, The Lima Reader seeks to capture the many worlds and many peoples of Peru’s capital city, featuring a selection of primary sources that consider the social tensions and cultural heritages of the “City of Kings.” If you fall in love with Lima during LASA, pick up The Lima Reader to learn more about it’s past and present.

decolonizing-dialectics-coverOther titles we’ll be featuring at LASA that you can pick up during our online sale include Decolonizing Dialectics by George Ciccariello-Maher, which brings the work of Georges Sorel, Frantz Fanon, and Enrique Dussel together with contemporary Venezuelan politics to formulate a decolonized dialectics that is suited to the struggle against the legacies of slavery and colonialism while also breaking the impasse between dialectics and postcolonial theory. And An Aqueous Territory: Sailor Geographies and New Granada’s Transimperial Greater Caribbean World by Ernesto Bassi, which examines the lives of those who resided in the Caribbean between 1760 and 1860 to trace the configuration of a dynamic geographic space he calls the transimperial Greater Caribbean, where residents made their own geographies and futures while trade, information, and people circulated freely across borders.

Punk and RevolutionWe are also featuring some music titles including The Great Woman Singer: Gender and Voice in Puerto Rican Music by Licia Fiol-Matta, which traces the careers of four iconic Puerto Rican singers; Musicians in Transit: Argentina and the Globalization of Popular Music by Matthew B. Karush, which examines the transnational careers of seven of the most influential Argentine musicians of the twentieth century; and Shane Greene’s Punk in Revolution: Seven More Interpretations of Peruvian Reality, which radically uproots punk from its iconic place in First World urban culture, Anglo popular music, and the Euro-American avant-garde, situating it instead as a crucial element in Peru’s culture of subversive militancy and political violence.

ddhahr_95_1If you’ve missed any special issues of Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), you can order them at the discount, too (but subscriptions are not eligible). Check out recent issues of HAHR including “New Directions in Colonial Latin American History” and “The New Drug History of the Americas.” Special issues of Labor, Public Culture, Radical History Review, and all our other journal issues are also on sale.

This special sale runs through May 10. See the rest of the fine print here. After May 10 you can still order the above titles and other Latin American studies works at a flat 30% discount using coupon code LASA17. Happy shopping!

 

Stock up for Summer at our Big Sale

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Get a head start on summer reading, stock up on texts for fall classes, or reward yourself for a semester’s hard work: our spring sale starts today and continues through May 10. Head to our website to save big on all in-stock books and journal issues.

During this sale, the more you buy, the more you save! Buy one or two books or journal issues and you save 30%, buy three or four and save 40%, and buy five or more and save 50%. To claim the discount, just enter coupon SUMMER17 when you check out.

Of course, there is some fine print. The discount does not apply to journals subscriptions or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. And you can’t combine multiple orders to maximize the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

You’ve only got two weeks to stock up, so start shopping now!

Stuart Hall’s First Encounter with London

In this excerpt from Stuart Hall’s new memoir, Familiar Stranger: A Life between Two Islands, he describes his trip with his mother, Jessie, from Jamaica to the United Kingdom. Hall had earned a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University and the two traveled there together in 1951. Enjoy the excerpt and then buy the book for 30% off with coupon E17FAMST.

978-0-8223-6387-3_pr w strokeIt is uncannily disconcerting to look back at my younger self, arriving in the port of Avonmouth in 1951, ready for a new life but absolutely unsure how it would happen, or what it would look like if it did. I was indeed elsewhere! I can say, however, that the colonial experience prepared me for England. Far from being an untroubled, innocent opportunity for me to step out into something new, this was an encounter which was mightily overdetermined.

My arrival preceded by some three months the general election in October in which the Conservatives ousted Labour and Winston Churchill regained the office of Prime Minister. After a short while I headed for Oxford University, into the very cultural heartland of England.

But this was an encounter which has not yet come to an end. It continues. It was, as Donald Hinds termed it a long while ago, ‘a journey to an illusion’ – or rather, a journey to the shattering of illusions, inaugurating a process of protracted disenchantment. I didn’t really know what I would find or what I would do with ‘it’ if I found ‘it’. I knew I didn’t want to be ‘it’, whatever that was. But I did want to encounter in the flesh, as it were, this phantasm of ‘other worlds’, swollen with – as it happened – false promise. What I really knew about Britain turned out to be a bewildering farrago of reality and fantasy. However, such illusions as I may have taken with me were unrealized because, fortunately, they were unrealizable. The episode was painful as well as exciting. It changed me irrevocably, almost none of it in ways I had remotely anticipated.

The whole experience was eerily familiar and disconcertingly strange at the same time. One can attribute this to the sense of déjà‑vu which assails colonial travellers on first encountering face-to-face the imperial metropole, which they actually know only in its translated form through a colonial haze, but which has always functioned as their ‘constitutive outside’: constituting them, or us, by its absence, because it is what they – we – are not. This is a manner of being defined from the beyond!

On the boat train to London, I kept feeling I’d seen this place somewhere before, as in a screen memory. It provoked a deep psychic recognition, an illusory after-effect. Had I been here before? Yes and no. I hadn’t anticipated what the English countryside would look like but, once I saw it whizzing past the train windows, I knew that this was how it should look: those proper, well-fed, black-and-white cows munching away contentedly in their neatly divided, hedgerowed fields surrounded by enormous, spreading sycamore trees. Everything I had read had prepared me for that. I knew, after all, the novels of Thomas Hardy. On the other hand, nothing had prepared me for the stark contrast between the sombre brick-and-cement hues and the well-disciplined dark, monotone character of London streets and the chaotic bustle of Kingston street life, with people shoving past one another on the crowded pavements, the handcarts and ice barrows with their rows of syrup bottles, the raucous hubbub and teeming vitality, provincial as it was.

London, when we got there, felt unwelcoming and forbidding. I guess my memories must have been infiltrated by what happened later, for what immediately comes to mind is the heavy, leaden autumn sky, the light permanently stuck halfway to dusk, the constant fine drizzle (where was the proper rain, the tropical downpour?), the blank windows of the square black cabs, the anonymity of the faces in the red double-decker buses, the yellow headlights glistening off the wet tarmac along the Bayswater Road. A dark, shuttered, anonymous city; high blocks of mansion flats,
turning up their noses at the life of the streets below. Everyone was buttoned up in dark suits, overcoats and hats, many carrying the proverbial umbrellas, scurrying with downcast eyes through the gathering gloom to unknown destinations. This was post-war austerity London, with its bombed-out sites, rubble and gaping spaces like missing teeth. A faint mist permanently shrouded Hyde Park, where ladies in jodhpurs and hard riding hats cantered their horses in the early mornings; the lights blazed in the Oxford Street department stores by three in the afternoon. There must have been bright and sunny days, for it was only the end of summer. But I don’t remember them.

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Personhood Is a Weapon by Eli Clare

Today’s post is an excerpt from Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure by Eli Clare, with an introduction by the author.

In this political moment as hate violence is on the rise, Trump is trying to ban Muslim refugees from the country, and the Attorney General has blamed disabled students for the lack of civility and disciplinbrilliant-imperfection-covere in public schools; so many groups of marginalized peoples are being treated as unworthy and disposable, essentially denied full personhood. The following meditation on personhood is excerpted from my newly released book, Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure. I wrote it thinking about white disabled woman Terri Schiavo, who died over a decade ago after a well-publicized and protracted legal struggle over ending her life. But I could as easily have been writing about significantly disabled Black lesbian teenager Jerika Bolan, who after expressing a desire to die wasn’t provided counseling and community support. Rather she was allowed to commit medically sanctioned suicide six months ago. Or I could have written about the unnamed Salvadoran asylum seeker, who in mid-February collapsed at a Texas ICE detention center, was taken to a hospital, diagnosed with a brain tumor, and then in the midst of treatment forcibly taken back to the detention center. If Jerika Bolan had been granted full personhood, she’d still be alive; if the Salvadoran asylum seeker had been granted full personhood, she wouldn’t be locked up in a detention center. More than ever, I believe personhood can be used as a weapon.

Some of us are granted personhood as our birthright, but others are required to prove and defend it every day. And when we fail this perverse test, we’re in trouble. Listen. I want us to remember Terri Schiavo. Debates about her raged in the news in 2004 and 2005.

Whatever happens after we die, our body-minds composting back to earth and air, I hope it’s more peaceful than Terri Schiavo’s last few days as she died of dehydration. Everyone — her parents, her husband, her doctors, the media — had an opinion about her and the feeding tube that had just been removed from her stomach.

She was a white woman who collapsed one day, her body-mind changing radically in a matter of minutes as oxygen stopped flowing to her brain and then started again. Some say she lost her ability to communicate, to think, to feel. Or perhaps we lost our capacity to listen. We’ll never know what floated beneath her skin. I want us to mourn for her.

Pundits and reporters, activists and scholars have written about her endlessly. I don’t know why I’m adding to their pile of words, except my memory of her won’t leave me alone.

She was a heterosexual woman whose husband decided she’d rather die than be disabled. Her hands curled, stiffened, joints freezing into contraction. He asserted his patriarchal ownership, refusing to let nurses slide rolled towels into her hands to help loosen her muscles. Nor would he allow them to teach her to swallow again, even though there was every sign that she could. He spent all his court-awarded settlement money on lawyers rather than care, comfort, and assistive technology. What words or fluttering images did she hold in her muscles and bones?

So many people surrounding Terri Schiavo assumed that she knew and felt nothing. Over and over again neurologists, journalists, judges made decisions about her body-mind based on the beliefs that language and self-awareness make us worthy, that death is better than disability, that withdrawing the basic human rights of food and water can be acts of compassion.

I could ponder self-consciousness, spiritual connection, and the divide between human and nonhuman. I could argue with the bioethicists who separate humanness from personhood, declaring pigs and chimpanzees to have more value than infants and significantly disabled people. But really, I’m not interested. I want us to rage for her.

She was a woman living in a hospital bed, referred to as a vegetable more than once. Did she lie in a river of shadow and light, pressure and sound? That too, we will never know. When she died, did we call her name?

Body-minds have value. Certainly I mean our own human selves, but I also mean heron, firefly, weeping willow. I mean dragonfly, birch, barn swallow. I mean goat and bantam rooster, mosquito and wood frog, fox and vulture — the multitude of beings that make home on this planet. I mean all body-minds, regardless of personhood.

She appeared to track the motion of balloons across her hospital room and grinned lopsidedly into the camera. Her life hung between a husband who said one thing and parents who said another, between legal pronouncements and diagnostic judgments. Do we remember her? I don’t mean the editorials, the pro-life versus pro-choice rhetoric, the religious and secular arguments, the political protest and vigil staged outside her hospice, the last-minute drama as Florida’s governor Jeb Bush and the U.S. Congress tried to intervene. I mean: do we remember her?

Too many of us acted as if Terri Schiavo’s body-mind stopped being her own. Depending on who we were and what stake we had in her life or death, we projected our fear, belief, hope, disgust, love, certainty onto her.

I’m trying to say that life and death sometimes hangs on an acknowledgement of personhood. Trying to say that personhood is used all too often as a weapon. Trying to say that while personhood holds tremendous power, its definitions are always arbitrary. Trying to say—I stutter over the gravity of those words.

Copyright Duke University Press, 2017. To order Brilliant Imperfection from us at a 30% discount, enter coupon code E17CLARE at checkout.

 

Congratulations to Our Award-Winning Designers

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Congratulations are again in order for our book designers, who have been honored by the Association of American University Presses for their book and cover designs. This year, 241 books, 2 Journals and 320 jacket and cover designs were submitted for a total of 563 entries.  The jurors carefully selected 50 books and 50 jackets and covers as the very best examples from this pool of excellent design.

Amy Ruth Buchanan was honored for her interior design of Performance by Diana Taylor and Natalie Smith received recognition for her cover design of the same book.

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Heather Hensley was honored for her cover design of Eating the Ocean by Elspeth Probyn.

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And Natalie Smith was also recognized for her cover design of My Life with Things by Elizabeth Chin.

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Congratulations to these talented staff members!

Lauren Pond Wins 2016 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

“We find ourselves at a moment when photo books are as important as ever, because they are concrete statements of artistic vision, essential counterweights in the ‘Ocean of Images’ that we swim through every day.”
—Peter Barberie, judge, 2016 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography

Pastor Randy “Mack” Wolford prays for a man during a service at the Church of the Lord Jesus in Jolo, West Virginia, September 2011. Photography by Lauren Pond.

 

Congratulations to Lauren Pond, a photographer based in Columbus, Ohio, who was selected by curator Peter Barberie of the Philadelphia Museum of Art to win the eighth biennial First Book Prize in Photography for her color series Test of Faith that document, as Pond writes, “a family of Pentecostal Holiness serpent handlers that I have photographed since 2011.”

Pond says, “Serpent handlers, also known as ‘Signs Followers,’ hold a literal interpretation of a verse in the New Testament’s Gospel of Mark, which states that, among other abilities, true believers shall be able to ‘take up serpents.’ Despite scores of deaths from snakebites and the closure of numerous churches, there remains a small contingent of serpent handlers devoted to keeping the practice alive. Who are the serpent handlers? What motivates them to keep going? These are questions that I sought to answer when I first traveled to West Virginia and met Pastor Randy ‘Mack’ Wolford, one of the best-known Signs Following preachers in the region.”

Pond photographed the events that followed and has continued her relationship with Mack’s family. As she says, “I no longer see my images as being about serpent-handling practice and culture. Instead, they serve as a record of my rich friendship with the Wolfords, our shared experiences, and the valuable insights they have given me into the tenets of their faith—namely, forgiveness and redemption.”

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First Book Prize judge Peter Barberie, Brodsky Curator of Photographs, Alfred Stieglitz Center, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art selected Pond’s photographs to win from a group of nine finalists because her “long-term documentation of the Wolford family emerged as a unique, cogent, and powerful topic for publication. Lauren Pond plunges us into the hothouse atmosphere of their faith. Through her photographs I can almost feel the physical strain of Mack’s worship, and I long to hear the song that his mother, Snook, sings as he accompanies her on guitar. Who are these purposeful, vibrant people so different from myself? Test of Faith commands this question and prompts me to consider the basis and limitations of my own worldview.”

Pond receives a grant of $3,000, inclusion in a website devoted to presenting the work of the prizewinners, and publication of a book of photography. Barberie will write the introduction, and Pond an afterword, to the book, which is forthcoming in November 2017 from Duke University Press in association with CDS Books of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Pond will also have a solo exhibition in Duke’s Rubenstein Library Photography Gallery, and the photographs will then be placed in the library’s Archive of Documentary Arts.

Lauren Pond, a documentary photographer who specializes in faith and religion, is currently the multimedia content producer for the American Religious Sounds Project within The Ohio State University’s Center for the Study of Religion. She also manages an art gallery and works on freelance projects across the country. She received her Master of Arts degree in photojournalism from Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication in 2014, and bachelor’s degrees in journalism and art from Northwestern University in 2009. Pond’s photographs have appeared in such publications as the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal, and have been recognized by the Magnum/Inge Morath Foundations, the Lucie Foundation, FotoVisura, Photo District News, College Photographer of the Year, and the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, among others. She has spoken about her work at universities and conferences across the United States.

The CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography is awarded by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the Honickman Foundation.

 

A Peruvian Punk Playlist

Shane Greene’s new book Punk and Revolution: Seven More Interpretations of Peruvian Reality is about the rise of an underground arts and music scene during Peru’s period of massive political violence between the Maoist Shining Path and a repressive state apparatus. Here is his playlist of many of the songs mentioned, or analyzed in depth in the book.

While not a definitive list, this is an excellent sampling of “rock subterráneo” music from 1980s Lima, Peru.  With a couple of vinyl exceptions, most of the music circulated in “demo” cassette format, and the songs selected represent a variety of musical sounds inspired by punk, post-punk, and hardcore genres that arose in the late 1970s and evolved into the present.

Band: Anti
Song:  ¿A quien quieres engañar?

Band: Autopsia
Song:  Mayoría equivocada

Band: Ataque Frontal
Song:  Ya no formo parte de esto

Band: Delirios Krónikos
Song: Bingo

Band: Curriculum Mortis
Song:  Decapitando curas

Band:  El Cuervo Sucio
Song: Hacía las cárceles

Band: Erecto Maldonado
Song: Venga a vivir a Ayacucho

Band: Eutanasia
Song:  Ratas callejeras

Band:  Éxodo
Song: Rock en Lima la Podrida

Band:  G3
Song: Antisocial

Band:  Guerrilla Urbana
Song:  Eres una pose

Band: KAOS
Song: Ayacucho – centro de opresión

Band: Kaos General
Song:  Botas militares

Band: Leusemia
Song: Astalculo

Band:  María T-ta y el Empujón Brutal
Song: La Desbarrancada

Band:  Narcosis
Song:  Destruir

Band: Q.E.P.D. Carreño
Song: Mi vida agoniza

Band: Salón Dadá
Song:  Gente insaciable

Band: Sociedad de Mierda
Song:  Púdrete pituco

Band:  Voz Propia
Song:  Hacía las cárceles

Band: Zcuela Crrada
Song: La esquina es la misma

To save 30% on Punk and Revolution, use coupon code E16PUNK at checkout on our website.