Awards

Journals Designer Sue Hall Retires after 23 Years at Duke University Press

sue-hallToday we’re sharing the bittersweet news that Duke University Press Journals Designer Sue Hall will retire this month after 23 years of working at the Press.

Sue has won numerous design awards for her work from the Association for University Presses (AUP) and the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ). Her most recent awards include the CELJ 2015 Award for Best Journal Design for the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, and the AUP 2017 Book, Jacket, and Journal Show awards for the interior and cover design for volume 67 of Archives of Asian Art and the cover design of volume 29 of Public Culture. She has contributed a chapter about journals design to Rich Hendel’s 2013 book, Aspects of Contemporary Book Design.

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Sue began working at Duke University Press in 1995 and immediately started to work with editors all over the world to design and redesign their journals’ covers and interiors. She found the process of redesigning an existing journal or designing a new one from scratch to be a positive and synergistic one. In a previous interview with Sue and former Journals Designer Kelly Andrus, Sue explained the process of redesigning a journal: “I enjoy the redesign process because I feel like I’m collaborating with a couple of people. One is the original designer of the journal, because I try to retain the things I think are successful and workable. I like the idea of the redesign being an evolution and not just a sudden change. To make it feel like an evolution, it needs to have a sense of continuity.” She also believes that  a complete reboot and overhaul of a journal’s design is sometimes needed to signal a change of direction in editorial mission or to reach a new audience.

miriam cooke, co-editor of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, shared her experience of redesigning the journal with Sue: “We had extraordinary conversations with Sue Hall about how to design the journal about things that never would have occurred to us. The care that every single page elicited from the design team was extraordinary. The way the journal looks externally is really important. What Duke does so well is to really work on the presentation of the journal and to make it change each time, which then becomes fun for the editors; it’s enormous fun.”

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Over the years, editors have called attention to Sue’s work for being innovative, award-winning, superb, beautiful, gifted, and meaningful. She takes pride in the trust and teamwork that she has been able to build over the years with journal editors. “I’ve discovered that there are a lot of nice pluses, one of which is working with Sue Hall, the journals designer, who is a really important collaborator for us because so much of our creative journal is conveyed through the art,” Tom Sellar, editor of Theater magazine, shared about working with Sue. “Sue has a great eye and great instinct for the photo that will really pull you into an article or to a feature, or how to position a cover in such a way in that it is an utterly alluring object to pick up.”

Sue has been integral to the ability of the Journals Production team to embrace two decades of inevitable and necessary changes to publishing, the department, and our vendor processes and workflows. She has been part of a team that has kept Duke University Press at the forefront of journal production and design with her ability to innovate and keep up with a challenging and changing publishing industry.

Throughout her tenure at Duke University Press, Sue has mentored several designers, and her design aesthetic can be seen not just in journal covers and interior designs, but in our marketing materials and online presence. She was a part of the teams who developed the Press’s original web presence and our new brand identity, and enjoyed the different iterations of design that she participated in while working at the Press.

Sue will be retiring from Duke University Press to resume her freelance design company, Number Nine, which she had been running when she originally started to do freelance work for the Press. While we are sad to see Sue leave, we are so excited to continue to follow her career and wish her the best in her future endeavors!

Society for Cinema and Media Studies 2018 Conference

We had a great time in Toronto at the annual conference of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies last week, selling books and journals and meeting authors and editors.

Queer Cinema in the WorldCongratulations to Karl Schoonover and Rosalind Galt, whose book Queer Cinema in the World won the Katherine Singer Kovacs award for outstanding scholarship in cinema and media studies.

We enjoyed a wine and cheese party celebrating the relaunch of our Camera Obscura book series (which is associated with our journal of the same name. Archiveology by Catherine Russell and Sisters in the Life edited by Yvonne Welbon and Alexandra Juhasz are the most recent books in the series.

Pamela Wojcik served as president of SCMS this year. She stopped by our booth to pose with her 2010 book The Apartment Plot. Her new edited collection, The Apartment Complex, is out in October.

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It’s always great to welcome authors and editors to the booth. Here are Lynn Comella, Rielle Navitski, Catherine Russell, and Yvonne Welbon and Alexandra Juhasz.

If you missed the meeting, you don’t have to miss the sale! Shop all our great media studies titles now and save 30% using coupon code SCMS18.

Congratulations to our Award-Winning Designers

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Once again our book and journal designers have been honored by the Association of University Presses in the annual Book, Jacket, and Journal Show.

978-0-8223-6366-8_prCongratulations to Amy Ruth Buchanan, whose interior design of Vinyl Freak: Love Letters to a Dying Medium by John Corbett was honored in the Scholarly Typographic category. The cover design is by Matt Tauch.

ddaaa_67_1In the Journals category, we congratulate Sue Hall. The committee singled out her overall design for Archives of Asian Art and  in particular her design for Volume 67. They also honored her design for Public Culture Volume 29.

The annual Book, Jacket, & Journal Show celebrates the design and production excellence demonstrated by university presses. The Show was founded in 1965 to “honor and instruct,” focusing on the principles of high-quality publication design, and how such design can serve readers and ideas. Through the annual catalog and the traveling show, the Association provides an inspiring hands-on look at this area of professional skill and artistry.m_pcult_29_3_83_cover

The 2018 Book, Jacket, & Journal Show Committee was chaired by Marianne Jankowski (Northwestern University Press), and the jurors were: Robert Bringhurst, author of The Elements of Typographic Style; Linda Secondari, principal at Studiolo Secondari; Sunra Thompson, Art Director at McSweeney’s; and Dan Wagstaff of Publishers Group Canada.

Congratulations, Amy and Sue, and thanks to all our designers for their wonderful work on our books and journals.

 

 

Foerster 2017 Prize Winner Announced

ddal_89_4We’re pleased to announce the 2017 winners of the Norman Foerster Prize, given to the best essays of the year published in American Literature. This year’s winner is John Levi Barnard for his essay “The Cod and the Whale: Melville in the Time of Extinction,” featured in volume 89, issue 4.

An honorable mention was awarded to Andrew Donnelly for “The Talking Book in the Secondary Classroom: Reading as a Promise of Freedom in the Era of Neoliberal Education Reform,” featured in volume 89, issue 2.

The committee had this to say about the prizewinning essay:

“John Levi Barnard’s ‘The Cod and the Whale: Melville in the Time of Extinction’ exemplifies what the interdisciplinary field of the environmental humanities can contribute to the study of literature. Dazzlingly researched and theorized, the essay’s elaboration of a textual and historical ‘extinction-producing economy’ models for critics and readers how to think about matter and text in the same analytic horizon.”

Regarding Donnelly’s honorable mention, committee members commented that the essay “takes seriously the intellectual and social stakes of how humanists have put their faith in the promise that literacy will lead to freedom. Deeply informed by the intersecting histories of literacy, gender, and race, Donnelly’s essay balances the urgency of resisting neoliberal institutional practices that reward the exceptional individual with a careful account of the ambivalence inhering in established narratives about the intrinsic power of literacy. The essay is a serious, thoughtful piece about the necessity of thinking about pedagogical practices through an intersectional and historical lens.”

The 2017 committee members were Stephanie Foote (chair), Rachel Adams, Marianne Noble, Matthew Taylor, and Priscilla Wald.

Congratulations to John Levi Barnard and Andrew Donnelly! Read the essays, made freely available.

American Anthropological Association 2017

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Booth staffers ready to go on the first day

The 2017 American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., was a great chance for us to meet authors and editors, sell books and journals to excited customers, and celebrate prize-winning books!

Our authors racked up quite a few awards at this year’s conference:

Metabolic Living by Harris Solomon and Tell Me Why My Children Died by Charles Briggs and Clara Mantini-Briggs were co-winners of the New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology.

Sareeta Amrute’s Encoding Race, Encoding Class won the Diana Forsythe Prize from the Committee for the Anthropology of Science, Technology & Computing. Plastic Bodies by Emilia Sanabria received honorable mention for this prize.

Emilia Sanabria’s Plastic Bodies also won the Michelle Rosaldo First Book Prize from the Association for Feminist Anthropology. Downwardly Global by Lalaie Ameeriar was a finalist for the same prize.

Aimee Meredith Cox’s Shapeshifters won the Delmos Jones & Jagna Sharff Memorial Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of North America.

The Look of a Woman by Eric Plemons won the Ruth Benedict Prize in the Single-Authored Monograph category from the Association for Queer Anthropology.

Yolanda Covington-Ward’s Gesture and Power won the Elliott P. Skinner Award from the Association for Africanist Anthropology.

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João Biehl toasts new edited collection Unfinished

Reel World by Anand Pandian won second place for the Victor Turner Prize from the Society for Humanistic Anthropology, and David McDermott Hughes’s Energy without Conscience received honorable mention for the same prize.

Everyday Conversions by Attiya Ahmad received honorable mention for the Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion.

Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

On Friday we enjoyed a wine reception for the new collection Unfinished: The Anthropology of Becoming with its editors João Biehl and Peter Locke.

It was exciting to see so many of our authors and editors in person. Check out the photo gallery:

 

Did you miss AAA this year? Not enough room in your luggage to carry all the books and journals you wanted? You can still take advantage of our 30% conference discount—just use coupon code AAA17 on our website through January 15.

French Historical Studies Authors Win Two Prizes

The Society for French Historical Studies has awarded two prizes to articles featured in French Historical Studies!

ddfhs_39_4The 2016 William Koren, Jr. Prize is awarded by the Society for French Historical Studies to the most outstanding article on any period of French history published the previous year by a scholar appointed at a college or university in the United States or Canada. The prize committee seeks out contenders from American, Canadian, and European journals and may decide whether articles that have appeared as part of a book or in the published proceedings of a scholarly conference are eligible for consideration. This year’s award goes to Nguyễn Thị Điểu, author of “Ritual, Power, and Pageantry: French Ritual Politics in Monarchical Vietnam.” This article is featured in French Historical Studies, volume 39, issue 4 (October 2016).

ddfhs_39_2The runner up for the 2016 Malcolm Bowie Prize was Dónal Hassett, whose article, “Pupilles de l’Empire: Debating the Provision for Child Victims of the Great War in the French Empire,” was featured in French Historical Studies volume 39, issue 2 (April 2016). The Malcolm Bowie Prize, given by the Society for French Historical Studies, is awarded each year for the best article published in the preceding year by an early-career researcher in the broader discipline of French Studies.

Congratulations to both winners! Read these award-winning articles, made freely available.

Association of Asian Studies, 2017

This past weekend, we enjoyed meeting authors and selling books and journals at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto.

Congratulations to author Tania Murray Li, who won the George McT. Kahin Prize from the AAS Southeast Asia Council for her book Land’s End: Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier!

On Friday we had a reception celebrating the launch of Archives of Asian Art. The reception was a fun way to celebrate the first issue of the journal published by Duke University Press with editor Stanley Abe and readers of the journal. Learn more about the journal here.

We snapped a few photos during the conference:

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Rebecca Karl with her book The Magic of Concepts

Arnika Fuhrmann

Arnika Furhmann with her book Ghostly Desires

Maggie Clinton

Maggie Clinton, whose book Revolutionary Nativism was just published

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Congratulations, Tania Murray Li!

If you missed AAS this year or didn’t grab all the books you wanted, don’t worry! You can still take advantage of the conference discount. Just use coupon code AAS17 for 30% off your order through our website.

Congratulations to Our Award-Winning Designers

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Congratulations are again in order for our book designers, who have been honored by the Association of American University Presses for their book and cover designs. This year, 241 books, 2 Journals and 320 jacket and cover designs were submitted for a total of 563 entries.  The jurors carefully selected 50 books and 50 jackets and covers as the very best examples from this pool of excellent design.

Amy Ruth Buchanan was honored for her interior design of Performance by Diana Taylor and Natalie Smith received recognition for her cover design of the same book.

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Heather Hensley was honored for her cover design of Eating the Ocean by Elspeth Probyn.

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And Natalie Smith was also recognized for her cover design of My Life with Things by Elizabeth Chin.

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Congratulations to these talented staff members!

Lauren Pond Wins 2016 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

“We find ourselves at a moment when photo books are as important as ever, because they are concrete statements of artistic vision, essential counterweights in the ‘Ocean of Images’ that we swim through every day.”
—Peter Barberie, judge, 2016 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography

Pastor Randy “Mack” Wolford prays for a man during a service at the Church of the Lord Jesus in Jolo, West Virginia, September 2011. Photography by Lauren Pond.

 

Congratulations to Lauren Pond, a photographer based in Columbus, Ohio, who was selected by curator Peter Barberie of the Philadelphia Museum of Art to win the eighth biennial First Book Prize in Photography for her color series Test of Faith that document, as Pond writes, “a family of Pentecostal Holiness serpent handlers that I have photographed since 2011.”

Pond says, “Serpent handlers, also known as ‘Signs Followers,’ hold a literal interpretation of a verse in the New Testament’s Gospel of Mark, which states that, among other abilities, true believers shall be able to ‘take up serpents.’ Despite scores of deaths from snakebites and the closure of numerous churches, there remains a small contingent of serpent handlers devoted to keeping the practice alive. Who are the serpent handlers? What motivates them to keep going? These are questions that I sought to answer when I first traveled to West Virginia and met Pastor Randy ‘Mack’ Wolford, one of the best-known Signs Following preachers in the region.”

Pond photographed the events that followed and has continued her relationship with Mack’s family. As she says, “I no longer see my images as being about serpent-handling practice and culture. Instead, they serve as a record of my rich friendship with the Wolfords, our shared experiences, and the valuable insights they have given me into the tenets of their faith—namely, forgiveness and redemption.”

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First Book Prize judge Peter Barberie, Brodsky Curator of Photographs, Alfred Stieglitz Center, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art selected Pond’s photographs to win from a group of nine finalists because her “long-term documentation of the Wolford family emerged as a unique, cogent, and powerful topic for publication. Lauren Pond plunges us into the hothouse atmosphere of their faith. Through her photographs I can almost feel the physical strain of Mack’s worship, and I long to hear the song that his mother, Snook, sings as he accompanies her on guitar. Who are these purposeful, vibrant people so different from myself? Test of Faith commands this question and prompts me to consider the basis and limitations of my own worldview.”

Pond receives a grant of $3,000, inclusion in a website devoted to presenting the work of the prizewinners, and publication of a book of photography. Barberie will write the introduction, and Pond an afterword, to the book, which is forthcoming in November 2017 from Duke University Press in association with CDS Books of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Pond will also have a solo exhibition in Duke’s Rubenstein Library Photography Gallery, and the photographs will then be placed in the library’s Archive of Documentary Arts.

Lauren Pond, a documentary photographer who specializes in faith and religion, is currently the multimedia content producer for the American Religious Sounds Project within The Ohio State University’s Center for the Study of Religion. She also manages an art gallery and works on freelance projects across the country. She received her Master of Arts degree in photojournalism from Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication in 2014, and bachelor’s degrees in journalism and art from Northwestern University in 2009. Pond’s photographs have appeared in such publications as the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal, and have been recognized by the Magnum/Inge Morath Foundations, the Lucie Foundation, FotoVisura, Photo District News, College Photographer of the Year, and the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, among others. She has spoken about her work at universities and conferences across the United States.

The CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography is awarded by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the Honickman Foundation.

 

American Historical Association, 2017

C1gClKkWgAAcmcK.jpgWe had a wonderful time meeting authors and selling books and journals at the 2017 American Historical Association Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado!

We were thrilled that several of our authors received awards at the conference:

C1g0062UUAErJJp.jpgNancy Rose Hunt won the Martin A. Klein Prize in Africanist History for her book A Nervous State.

Barbara Weinstein’s The Color of Modernity won the Conference on Latin American History’s Warren Dean Memorial Prize.

Christopher Boyer’s book Political Landscapes received honorable mention for this year’s Bolton-Johnson Prize for Best Book in English on Latin American History from the CLAH.

And Mary Kay Vaughan, author of Portrait of a Young Painter, won the 2016 Distinguished Service Award from the CLAH. Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

It was great to visit with authors and editors who stopped by our booth:

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Robyn Spencer, author of The Revolution Has Come

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Ernesto Bassi, center, with his book An Aqueous Territory

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Hispanic American Historical Review editor Pete Sigal

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Natasha Lightfoot stopped by to take a photo with her book Troubling Freedom–only to find it was already sold out!

Missed AHA this year? Didn’t have enough room in your suitcase for all the books you wanted? Don’t worry–you can still stock up with our 30% conference discount. Just use coupon code AHA17 during checkout at dukeupress.edu.