Awards

Spring Awards

We’d like to celebrate our many authors who have earned various awards and honors for their books this spring. Congratulations!

Suzanne Preston Blier’s book Picasso’s Demoiselles has won the Robert Motherwell Book Award from the Dedalus Foundation and was also selected as a finalist for the PROSE Awards from the Association of American Publishers.

Nina Sun Eidsheim’s book The Race of Sound was selected as a finalist for the Big Other Book Award for Nonfiction from Big Other magazine.

Sasha Su-Ling Welland’s book Experimental Beijing has won the Joseph Levenson Book Prize (Post-1900) from the Association for Asian Studies (AAS).

Juno Salazar Parreñas’s book Decolonizing Extinction has received an honorable mention for the Harry J. Benda Prize from the Southeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies (SEAC/AAS).

Renisa Mawani’s book Across Oceans of Law has won the AAAS History Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies (AAAS).

The following books were selected as finalists for the Lambda Literary Awards from the Lambda Literary Foundation: Beside You in Time by Elizabeth Freeman, Bloodflowers by W. Ian Bourland, Honeypot by E. Patrick Johnson, Queering Black Atlantic Religions by Roberto Strongman, and Trans Exploits by Jian Neo Chen.

Kathleen M. Millar’s book Reclaiming the Discarded was selected as a finalist for the SEA Book Prize from the Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA).

Matt Brim’s book Poor Queer Studies was selected as a finalist for the O.L. Davis, Jr. Outstanding Book Award from the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum.

Elspeth H. Brown’s book Work! was selected as a finalist for the Mary Jurich Nickliss Prize in US Women’s and/or Gender History from the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

Aren Z. Aizura’s book Mobile Subjects has won the Sylvia Rivera Award in Transgender Studies from the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies (CLAGS).

Noémi Tousignant’s book Edges of Exposure has won the Ludwik Fleck Prize from the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S).

Sara Ann Wylie’s book Fractivism has won the Rachel Carson Prize from the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S).

Esther Gabara’s book Pop América, 1965–1975 has received an honorable mention for the Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award from the College Art Association (CAA).

We also congratulate our own Design Manager Amy Ruth Buchanan. She was honored by the Association of University Presses for her design of Susan Laxton’s book Surrealism at Play

Winter Awards

We’d like to celebrate our many authors who have garnered awards for their books this winter. Congratulations!

Zeb Tortorici’s book Sins against Nature has won the Alan Bray Memorial Book Award from The Gay and Lesbian Caucus of the Modern Language Association. This book also won the NECLAS Marysa Navarro Best Book Prize from the New England Council of Latin American Studies (NECLAS).

Sasha Su-Ling Welland’s book Experimental Beijing has won the Francis L K Hsu Prize from the Society for East Asian Anthropology (SEAA) Section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA).

Licia Fiol-Matta’s book The Great Woman Singer has co-won the MLA Prize in US Latina/o and Chicana/o Literary and Cultural Studies from the Modern Language Association (MLA).

Leticia Alvarado’s book Abject Performances has received an honorable mention for the MLA Prize in US Latina/o and Chicana/o Literary and Cultural Studies from the Modern Language Association (MLA).

Christopher Taylor’s book Empire of Neglect has won the Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize from the American Studies Association (ASA).

Juno Salazar Parreñas’s book Decolonizing Extinction has received an honorable mention for the New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA) Section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA).

Noenoe K. Silva’s book The Power of the Steel-tipped Pen has won the Ka Palapala Po’okela Award from the Hawaii Book Publishers Association.

Jason Borge’s book Tropical Riffs has won the Robert M. Stevenson Prize from the American Musicological Association (AMS).

Bianca C. Williams’s book The Pursuit of Happiness has won the Nelson Graburn Book Award from the Anthropology Tourism Interest Group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA).

Eliza Steinbock’s book Shimmering Images has won the SCMS Best First Book Award from the Society for Cinema & Media Studies (SCMS).

Esther Gabara’s book Pop América, 1965–1975 was selected as a finalist for The Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award from the College Art Association (CAA).

Renisa Mawani’s book Across Oceans of Law was selected as a finalist for The Socio-Legal Theory and History Prize from the Socio-Legal Studies Association.

Rosalind Fredericks’s book Garbage Citizenship has won the Toyin Falola Africa Book Award from the Association of Third World Studies (ATWS).

2019 Foerster Prize Winner Announced

We’re pleased to announce the winner of the 2019 Norman Foerster Prize, awarded to the best essay of the year in American Literature: “Reconstructing Revenge: Race and Justice after the Civil War” by Gregory Laski, published in volume 91, issue 4. Read the essay, freely available through the end of March, here.

The prize committee had this to say about the winning essay:

“Gregory Laski presents an ambitious, thorough, and wide-ranging discussion of the vexed rhetoric of revenge and forgiveness in the postbellum South. His reading of diverse historical and legal documents concerned with vengeance demonstrates both the risks and utility of vengeance during this period; it also deftly sets up his persuasive reading of Pauline Hopkins’s understudied 1902 novel Winona. Laski dismantles the false distinction between justice and revenge through the notion of “righteous revenge” in paradigm-shifting ways. That this idea engages with larger ethical questions about the redress of (ongoing) wrongs perpetrated against African Americans is made explicit in the elegant coda.”

There were two runners-up for this year’s Foerster Prize: Sara Marcus’s “‘Time Enough, but None to Spare’: The Indispensable Temporalities of Charles Chesnutt’s The Marrow of Tradition” (volume 91, issue 1) and Julius B. Fleming Jr.’s “Transforming Geographies of Black Time: How the Free Southern Theater Used the Plantation for Civil Rights Activism” (volume 91, issue 3). Both essays are freely available through March. The committee had these comments to share about the two runners-up:

“Sara Marcus’s essay challenges the prevailing tendency to associate linear time with heteronormativity, capital, racism, and imperialism and—correspondingly—nonlinear time with queerness, resistance, refusal, and escape.  Although this association has been useful in some ways, Marcus argues that it sets up a simplistic binary. In an insightful reading of Charles Chesnutt’s The Marrow of Tradition, Marcus shows that both normative and nonnormative temporalities are utilized by white supremacists to maintain and assert power. Conversely, teleological concepts for time can be embraced by black characters in the name of progress, while blackness can also interrupt the violence of racism by suspending time. Marcus strongly and convincingly makes the case that neither linear nor nonlinear temporalities are inherently oppressive or liberatory and therefore that scholars working on time abandon these cut-and-dried associations.

“Julius B. Fleming Jr. assembles a wide-ranging and unique archive to theorize what he terms ‘black patience,’ a concept whose contours, uses, and misuses he traces with meticulous care and bold insight. In the process, he advances a methodological approach to black patience (and to other useful notions, including time and timing more generally) that should deeply inform scholarship in African American culture, political organizing, and performance. This essay is a feat of original research, syncretic analysis, and inventive theorization.”

Congratulations to Gregory Laski, Sara Marcus, and Julius B. Fleming Jr.!

2019 Modern Language Association Highlights and Awards

This year’s meeting of the Modern Language Association was absolutely packed with awards, receptions, and events—and, like always, we had a wonderful time meeting authors, editors, and attendees and selling our books and journals.

49432745_10158188872573378_8294288817372790784_o

Congratulations to Melanie Yergeau, whose book Authoring Autism won the MLA Prize for a First Book, and Fred Moten, whose book Black and Blur won the William Sanders Scarborough Prize!

Several of our journals and books also received awards from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) and from the GL/Q Caucus for the Modern Languages:

CELJ Awards

Archives of Asian Art, the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and American Literature each received a CELJ award this year—congratulations to these journals!

coverimageThis year’s Best Journal Design Award was given to Archives of Asian Art. Upon joining Duke University Press in 2017, the journal was redesigned by Sue Hall, our now-retired journals designer of 23 years. The 2018 Association of University Presses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show also recognized the journal’s redesign: “The new design stands out because of the luxurious and well-placed illustrations and because it combines an elegant, versatile page design with fine-grained typographic sophistication,” wrote eminent typographer Robert Bringhurst.

The CELJ also recognized two of our journal issues with the Best Special Issue Award: “Queer about Comics,” an issue of American Literature (volume 90, issue 2) edited by Darieck Scott and Ramzi Fawaz; and “The Bible and English Readers,” an issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (volume 47, issue 3) edited by Thomas Fulton.

GL/Q Caucus Celebration and Awards

49501685_10158188872293378_6762294920855158784_o

Marcia Ochoa and Jennifer DeVere Brody with the 25th-anniversary issue of GLQ

This year, the GL/Q Caucus celebrated the 25th anniversary of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies with a panel on the journal and a reception. The caucus also awarded prizes to several outstanding books and journal articles:

The Crompton-Noll Award was given to Mary Zaborskis for the article “Sexual Orphanings,” published in GLQ (volume 22, issue 4), and Margaret Galvan for the article “‘The Lesbian Norman Rockwell’: Alison Bechdel and Queer Grassroots Networks,” published in American Literature (volume 90, issue 2).

The Alan Bray Book Award was granted to Jasbir Puar, author of The Right to Maim, and Ariane Cruz, author of The Color of Kink (NYU Press). Kadji Amin, author of Disturbing Attachments, received honorable mention, as did Tourmaline, Eric A. Stanley, and Johanna Burton, editors of Trap Door (New Museum and MIT Press).

Eric A. Stanley and Andrew Spieldenner received the Michael Lynch Award for Service, which, in Eve Sedgwick’s words, serves “to publicize and celebrate—and as widely as possible—the range, the forms, the energy, and the history of queer activism by academics.”

Other Highlights

We enjoyed celebrating several new journals with a wine reception Friday afternoon: Critical TimesEnglish Language Notes, Journal of Korean StudiesMeridiansPrism, and Qui Parle.

It was also wonderful to see several of our authors who stopped by the booth:

Thank you to all who came by to see us! For those of you who weren’t able to make it out to MLA, or who didn’t have enough room in your suitcase to pack all the books you wanted, don’t worry—you can still take advantage of the conference discount by using coupon code MLA19 at dukeupress.edu through the end of February.

American Anthropological Association, 2018

DsAMhaIVsAAV54l

Excited booth staffers after setting up!

It was wonderful to meet excited customers, sell books and journals, and celebrate our award-winning authors and editors at this year’s American Anthropological Association meeting in San José! Thanks to everyone who came by our booth to browse our stock or say hello.

Our anthropology titles were honored with more awards this year than every before! We are so excited to congratulate the following authors:

Check out our photo gallery of authors and editors:

 

Missed the conference? Not able to fit all the books you wanted into your luggage? You can still save on anthropology paperbacks through the end of the year—just use coupon code AAA18 at dukeupress.edu.

Congratulations to MacArthur Fellow Wu Tsang

Congratulations to filmmaker and performance artist Wu Tsang on winning a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship. Tsang is the co-author (with Fred Moten) of “Sudden Rise at a Given Tune,” the textual component of an eponymous performance by Tsang and Moten given at the Tate Modern, London on March 25, 2017. The text is featured in our journal South Atlantic Quarterly and is openly available for three months.

Tsang was the writer, director, and editor of—as well as a central character in—the 2012 feature film Wildness, which was reviewed in Transgender Studies Quarterly. Read the article here, where it is openly available for three months. She has also created a number of other films that have been exhibited or screened in many venues around the world.

The MacArthur Foundation praises Tsang for reimagining “racialized, gendered representations beyond the visible frame to encompass the multiple and shifting perspectives through which we experience the social realm.”

Watch a video of Tsang discussing her work:

Congratulations to MacArthur Fellow Lisa Parks

Parks_2018_hi-res-download_smallCongratulations to MIT media scholar Lisa Parks on winning a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship! Parks is the co-editor (with Caren Kaplan) of the recent book Life in the Age of Drone Warfare and co-editor (with Elana Levine) of the 2007 collection Undead TV: Essays on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. She has also contributed essays to several other collections we have published.

Parks is the author of the 2005 book Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual. The MacArthur Foundation calls it “a groundbreaking analysis of satellite use, including live international transmissions, 978-0-8223-3497-2_pr
archeological excavations via remote sensing, and satellite images documenting mass graves in Srebrenica during the Bosnian conflict.”

The MacArthur Foundation praises Parks for “extending the parameters of media studies and revealing the ways in which media technologies have come increasingly to define our everyday lives, politics, and culture.”

Watch a video of Parks discussing her work:

Editorial Office of Duke Mathematical Journal Returns to Duke University

DMJ_167_11The Department of Mathematics, Duke University, and Duke University Press are pleased to announce that Richard Hain has been appointed managing editor for the Duke Mathematical Journal and that the journal’s editorial office will return to Duke University after more than 20 years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where Jonathan Wahl has served as managing editor. Wahl will continue his involvement with the journal as co-managing editor through June 2019.

“Jonathan Wahl has done a fantastic job growing the journal, and we are excited that he will be handing it off to Dick Hain this year,” said Jonathan Mattingly, Chair of the Department of Mathematics at Duke University. “Hain is a versatile mathematician who brings a broad view of the subject. Having the journal back at Duke will facilitate more exciting collaborations between the department and the journal.”

Hain, Professor of Mathematics at Duke University, has focused his career on the study of the topology of complex algebraic varieties. He has published multiple books and journal articles and has received numerous awards. Hain earned a BS from the University of Sydney in Australia, an MA from the Australian National University, and a PhD from the University of Illinois.

Hain said, “I am looking forward to working with the editors and the staff of Duke University Press to maintain the Duke Mathematical Journal as one of the world’s leading mathematics journals. I would like to thank Jonathan Wahl for his hard work and commitment to the journal over the past 21 years.”

“We are excited for the Duke Mathematical Journal to return to Duke University,” said Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press. “DMJ is one of the leading journals in its field and I appreciate the work that Jonathan Wahl at UNC Chapel Hill did to grow its reputation. We’re looking forward to continuing to work with him in the first year of the journal’s transition back to Duke.”

The Duke Mathematical Journal, published by Duke University Press since its inception in 1935, found its origin within the inner circles of the American mathematical research community and is one of the top mathematics journals in the world. The journal has published work by 10 Abel Prize winners, 24 Fields Medalists, and 25 Wolf Prize winners. Its Impact Factor increased from 2.171 in 2016 to 2.317 in 2017.

Visit the journal’s homepage on Project Euclid to learn more.

Duke Mathematical Journal Editors Win Prestigious Fields and Chern Medals

Alessio_FigalliCongratulations to Alessio Figalli, an editor of Duke Mathematical Journal, who won the 2018 Fields Medal. The Fields Medal is awarded every four years to mathematicians under the age of 40 who show “outstanding mathematical achievement for existing work and for the promise of future achievement.” The winners were announced yesterday at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Figalli was lauded for his contributions to the theory of optimal transport and its applications in partial differential equations, metric geometry, and probability. To learn more about Figalli’s work, read the press release from the International Mathematical Union.

While several editors of Duke Mathematical Journal have won the Fields Medal, including Jean Bourgain and Simon K. Donaldson, this is the first time the award has been presented to a current editor of the journal.

To read his work, browse Figalli’s articles on Project Euclid.


Masaki_KashiwaraWe are also pleased to share that Masaki Kashiwara, also an editor of Duke Mathematical Journal, has won the 2018 Chern Medal. The Chern Medal Award is given to an individual whose accomplishments warrant the highest level of recognition for outstanding achievements in the field of mathematics.

Kashiwara was honored for his “outstanding and foundational contributions to algebraic analysis and representation theory sustained over a period of almost 50 years.” To learn more about Kashiwara’s work, read the press release from the International Mathematical Union.

To read his work, browse Kashiwara’s articles on Project Euclid.

Congratulations to both winners!

Duke University Press Sponsors ACRL awards for librarians working in Women’s and Gender Studies

acrl_1Duke University Press is pleased to announce its sponsorship of two achievement awards through the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS). The Significant Achievement Award and the Career Achievement Award will be presented at the 2018 American Library Association (ALA) annual meeting this week.

Significant Achievement Award

Shirley Lew, dean of library, teaching, and learning services at Vancouver Community College and Baharak Yousefi, head of library communications at Simon Fraser University, are the winners of the 2018 ACRL WGSS Award for Significant Achievement in Women and Gender Studies Librarianship.

This award, honoring a significant or one-time contribution to women and gender studies librarianship, was presented to Lew and Yousefi for their book, Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership. Feminists Among Us makes explicit the ways in which a grounding in feminist theory and practice impacts the work of library administrators who identify as feminists. Award chair Dolores Fidishun lauds the book as “a seminal review of the intersection of feminism, power, and leadership in our profession.”

Career Achievement Award

Diedre Conkling, director of the Lincoln County Library District, is the winner of the 2018 ACRL WGSS Award for Career Achievement.

This award, honoring significant long-standing contributions to women and gender studies in the field of librarianship over the course of a career, was presented to Conkling for her work as a longtime member of the WGSS, Feminist Task force, the Committee on the Status of Women in Librarianship, and the Library Leadership and Management Association Women’s Administrator’s Discussion Group.

“Conkling has continuously brought women’s issues to the forefront of our organization,” Fidishun states, “and has served as an inspiration and mentor to many of us in the association. Through her activism she has demonstrated the power of women’s voices in ALA and in the world, always asking the important questions and looking for ways to move women’s agendas forward in ALA.”

Congratulations to all winners!

About ACRL

The Association of College and Research Libraries is the higher education association for librarians. Representing nearly 10,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products, and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community.

About Duke University Press’s commitment to emerging fields

Duke University Press is committed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge and contributing boldly to the international community of scholarship, promoting a sincere spirit of tolerance and a commitment to learning, freedom, and truth. An early establisher of scholarship in queer theory, gender studies, and sexuality studies, Duke University Press is dedicated to supporting others who contribute to these fields.