Environmental Studies

Read to Respond: Environmental Activism and Climate Change

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on environmentalism and climate change in light of Earth Day and the March For Science, a international series of rallies uniting scientists, science enthusiasts, and concerned citizens against recent anti-environmentalist legislation. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Environmental Activism and Climate Change

Journal articles are freely available until August 15, 2017. To save 30% on the listed books, please use coupon SAVE30 on our website. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond. 

Read to Respond: Articles for Student Activists

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Articles for Student Activists:

These articles are freely available until August 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

Open Access at Duke University Press: Blog Series Highlights

open-access-efforts-at-duke-university-pressOver the past week we have shared a series of four blog posts covering open access at Duke University Press. Topics in the series included Project Euclid, Knowledge Unlatched, Environmental Humanities, and The Carlyle Letters Online.

Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid, shared information about the platform and the ways it supports open access in the mathematics and statistics world.

Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press, offered information about how we’ve participated with Knowledge Unlatched in the past and why we’ll continue in the future.

Brent Kinser, coordinating editor for The Carlyle Letters Online, shared his thoughts on the project and discussed his vision for its future.

We highlighted some of the exciting new content from the open-access journal Environmental Humanities, edited by Thom van Dooren and Elizabeth DeLoughrey, and the relationship between the journal and its five leading research university partners.

To learn more about these open-access initiatives at Duke University Press, read our previous blog posts.

Open Access: Environmental Humanities

We have created a series of five blog posts covering open access at Duke University Press. Today’s post features Environmental Humanities, an international, open-access journal focused on the most current interdisciplinary research on the environment. ddenv_8_2_cover

Responding to the rapid environmental and social change in our time,  Environmental Humanities’ scholarship draws humanities disciplines into conversation with each other and with the natural and social sciences.

Currently in its fourth year, Environmental Humanities publishes interdisciplinary papers that do not fit comfortably within the established environmental subdisciplines, as well as submissions from within these fields whose authors want to reach a broader readership. Such scholarship has taken its readers into the worlds of sheep and young French shepherds; of stones, worms, and forest-devouring beetles; of the potential weaponization of echolocation; of crows, seals, and lava flows in Hawaii. The journal also publishes a special section called “The Living Lexicon,” a series of 1,000-word essays on keywords in the environmental humanities that highlight how each term can move the field forward under the dual imperative of critique and action.

Funding Access

Open access is an important part of Environmental Humanities’ mission to reach new readers who can develop bold, innovative interdisciplinary approaches to environmental scholarship. The journal is currently sustained by a collaborative partnership among five universities, but the journal’s editors and the Press hope to establish a broader base of support among additional universities and libraries to ensure the journal’s future.

The journal’s current sponsors are Concordia University, Canada; the Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney, Australia; the University of California, Los Angeles, USA; the Environmental Humanities Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; the Environmental Humanities Program, University of New South Wales, Australia. These sponsoring institutions make Environmental Humanities’ content readily available to scholars across the world.

Climate Change and the Production of Knowledge

saq_116_1Though the causes and effects of climate change pervade our everyday lives—the air we breathe, the food we eat, the objects we use—the way the discourse of climate change influences how we make meaning of ourselves and our world is still unexplored. Contributors to this special issue of SAQ: South Atlantic Quarterly, “Climate Change and the Production of Knowledge,” bring diverse perspectives to the ways that climate change science and discourse have reshaped the contemporary architecture of knowledge itself: reconstituting intellectual disciplines and artistic practices, redrawing and dissolving boundaries, and reframing how knowledge is represented and disseminated.

The contributors address the emergence of global warming discourse in fields like history, journalism, anthropology, and the visual arts; the collaborative study of climate change between the human and material sciences; and the impact of climate change on forms of representation and dissemination in this new interdisciplinary landscape.

In “Environmental Activism across the Pacific,” this issue’s Against the Day section, contributors address forms of activism in which people seek to protect continuingly creative but ordinary life processes that conflict with imagined or emergent military bases, plantations, tourism infrastructures, and mines. From the introduction to the section:

It may be tempting to tell stories that focus only on the immensity and exceptionality of such contemporary ecological crises, but there are more stories to be told of the Pacific. The essays collected here not only reveal engagement with deeper trajectories of both violence and resistance, but also explore activism that maintains and constructs modes of life and relations of care among humans, the land, the ocean, and other beings.

Read the essays in this section, made freely available through July 2017.

Against the Day is a thematic section composed of short essays that engage topics of contemporary political importance. The title, “Against the Day,” is meant to highlight both the modes of activism and the specific occasion that the essays address.

American Studies Association 2016

1We had such a wonderful time selling books and journals at the American Studies Association last week in Denver, Colorado.

On Friday we had a reception celebrating Small Axe‘s fiftieth issue and twentieth anniversary. The wine and cheese were great, but the Small Axe swag was an even bigger hit!

The reception was fun way to celebrate with editor David Scott, managing editor Vanessa Pérez-Rosario, editorial board members, and readers of the journal. Keep the celebration going by reading Small Axe #50.

Friday night also included a reception for GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies. It was great to see so many scholars and contributors to the journal, as well as co-editors Beth Freeman and Marcia Ochoa, celebrating the journal.

Several of our authors won awards for their books. Simone Browne won the 2016 Lora Romero Prize for her book, Dark Matters, and Lisa Lowe’s Intimacies of Four Continents was a finalist for the 2016 John Hope Franklin Prize, both from ASA.

It was wonderful to see so many authors and editors stop by our booth. We loved seeing them with their books, and especially enjoyed E. Patrick Johnson and Kai Green’s reenactment of the No Tea, No Shade cover!

Not able to make it out this year? Are there a few more books or journal issues you wish you would have grabbed? Don’t worry—you can use the coupon code ASA16 on our website through the end of the year to stock up on our great American studies titles for 30% off.

The Challenge of Ecology to the Humanities

ddngc_43_2_128The most recent issue of New German Critique, “The Challenge of Ecology to the Humanities: Posthumanism or Humanism,” edited by Bernhard F. Malkmus and Heather I. Sullivan, continues a decades-old debate on the relationship between the humanities and ecology. The relationship is historically ambiguous: where humanists tend to view the human as an ecological being, posthumanists reject references to “nature” as mere cultural fabrication. However, the global ecological crisis and an increasing awareness human impact on the planet as an ecosystem have forced the humanities to rethink their hidden anthropological and ecological assumptions.

The Challenge of Ecology to the Humanities” puts voices from historical, philosophical and literary disciplines in dialogue with each other with the goal of mapping out various possibilities for the humanities broadly but also specifically for the environmental humanities today.

Topics in this issue include posthumanist anthropology, nomadic knowledge, and narrating sustainability.

Read the introduction, made freely available.

Now Available: First Issue of Environmental Humanities Published by Duke University Press

ddenv_8_1We are pleased to announce the first issue of Environmental Humanities published by Duke University Press, volume 8, issue 1, “Multispecies Studies,” is now available at environmentalhumanities.dukejournals.org.

Environmental Humanities, edited by Thom van Dooren (University of New South Wales, Australia) and Elizabeth DeLoughrey (University of California, Los Angeles, USA), is a peer-reviewed, international, open-access journal. The journal publishes outstanding interdisciplinary scholarship that draws humanities disciplines into conversation with each other, and with the natural and social sciences, around significant environmental issues. Environmental Humanities has a specific focus on publishing the best interdisciplinary scholarship; as such, the journal has a particular mandate to:

  • Publish interdisciplinary papers that do not fit comfortably within the established environmental subdisciplines, and
  • Publish high-quality submissions from within any of these fields that are accessible and seeking to reach a broader readership.

Topics in “Multispecies Studies” include elephants and herpes, the Xenopus pregnancy test, cosmoecological sheep, and geologic conviviality.

Environmental Humanities is funded and managed through a partnership with five leading research centers: Concordia University; Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney; University of California, Los Angeles; Environmental Humanities Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology; and the Environmental Humanities Program, University of New South Wales.

To read more from the journal, visit environmentalhumanities.dukejournals.org.

Land and the Novel

NOV491_C1The most recent issue of Novel, “Land and the Novel,” features essays from two symposiums held at Duke University in October 2013 and the biennial Society for Novel Studies Conference in Salt Lake City in April 2014. “I was intrigued by the coincidence that within the same year, two different planning committees for quite separate events independently decided on such closely related conference themes,” Novel editor Nancy Armstrong writes in the introduction to the issue.

Included in “Land and the Novel” are two keynote addresses. In his keynote, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o offers an Alice-through-the-looking-glass explanation of what it was like to write a novel that reflects on everyday cultural experience from the perspective of the unreal space of prison. Ursula K. Heise’s keynote, “Terraforming for Urbanists,” examines the convergence of the science-fiction motif of terraforming with current discussions of the Anthropocene.

The essays that follow the keynotes are arranged in chronological order. Additional topics include taxonomic capture in James Fenimore Cooper’s The Prairie, walking in Bleak House, and novel spaces and the limits of the planetary, among others. Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, made freely available.

For more reading on the Anthropocene, check out our blog post on recent scholarship in the humanities.

Climate Change and the Future of Cities

ddpcult_28_2We live in the age of extremes, a period punctuated by significant disasters that have changed the way we understand risk, vulnerability, and the future of communities. Violent ecological events such as Superstorm Sandy attest to the urgent need to analyze what cities around the world are doing to reduce carbon emissions, develop new energy systems, and build structures to enhance preparedness for catastrophe. Contributors to the most recent issue of Public Culture, “Climate Change and the Future of Cities: Mitigation, Adaptation, and Social Change on an Urban Planet,” illustrate that the best techniques for safeguarding cities and critical infrastructure systems from threats related to climate change have multiple benefits, strengthening networks that promote health and prosperity during ordinary times as well as mitigating damage during disasters.

The essays in this issue were developed through a multiyear ethnographic research project on climate change adaptation in a wide range of cities, conducted by some of the most innovative scholars working on climate and culture today. Research for this work involved a blend of fieldwork, interviews, and policy analysis, which allowed the contributors to assess whether the emerging models for adaptation work as well in practice as they do in theory, and to identify challenges for exporting “best practices” to different parts of the world.

The contributors provide a truly global perspective on topics, which include the toxic effects of fracking, water rights in the Los Angeles region, wind energy in southern Mexico, and water scarcity from Brazil to the Arabian Peninsula. The issue is freely available for the next two months.

Interested in learning more about climate change? Don’t miss this recent scholarship:

callisonIn How Climate Change Comes to Matter, Candis Callison examines the initiatives of social and professional groups as they encourage diverse American publics to care about climate change. She explores the efforts of science journalists, scientists who have become expert voices for and about climate change, American evangelicals, Indigenous leaders, and advocates for corporate social responsibility. Callison investigates the different vernaculars through which we understand and articulate our worlds, as well as the nuanced and pluralistic understandings of climate change evident in different forms of advocacy.

pilkey.jpgAn internationally recognized expert on the geology of barrier islands, Orrin H. Pilkey is one of the rare academics who engages in public advocacy about science-related issues. In Global Climate Change: A Primer, the colorful scientist takes on climate change deniers in an outstanding and much-needed primer on the science of global change and its effects. Pilkey, writing with son Keith, directly confronts and rebuts arguments typically advanced by global change deniers. Particularly valuable are their discussions of “Climategate,” a manufactured scandal that undermined respect for the scientific community, and denial campaigns by the fossil fuel industry.