Events

Exhibitions and Spring Art Books

This spring, we’re distributing three gorgeous art books that correspond with exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum, the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, and the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center. We’re happy to extend the reach of these important and beautifully designed catalogues, published by each respective museum, and we hope you can make it out to an exhibition or two.

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Faith Ringgold (American, born 1930). For the Women’s House, 1971. Oil on canvas, 96 x 96 in. (243.8 x 243.8 cm). Courtesy of Rose M. Singer Center, Rikers Island Correctional Center. © 2017 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

A landmark exhibition on display at the Brooklyn Museum through September 17, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85 examines the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism. It showcases the work of black women artists such as Emma Amos, Maren Hassinger, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, and Betye Saar, making it one of the first major exhibitions to highlight the voices and experiences of women of color. In so doing, it reorients conversations around race, feminism, political action, art production, and art history in this significant historical period.

The accompanying Sourcebook republishes an array of rare and little-known documents from the period by artists, writers, cultural critics, and art historians such as Gloria Anzaldúa, James Baldwin, bell hooks, Lucy R. Lippard, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Lowery Stokes Sims, Alice Walker, and Michelle Wallace. These documents include articles, manifestos, and letters from significant publications as well as interviews, some of which are reproduced in facsimile form. The Sourcebook also includes archival materials, rare ephemera, and an art-historical overview essay. Helping readers to move beyond standard narratives of art history and feminism, this volume will ignite further scholarship while showing the true breadth and diversity of black women’s engagement with art, the art world, and politics from the 1960s to the 1980s.

We Wanted a Revolution is curated by Catherine Morris and Rujeko Hockley. In addition to the Brooklyn Museum, it will also be on display at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles from October 13, 2017, through January 14, 2018; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, from February 17, 2018, through May 27, 2018; and the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston from June 26, 2018, through September 30, 2018. Find more details about the exhibition or purchase the Sourcebook.

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Nina Chanel Abney, Incite (COM), 2015. Unique ultrachrome pigmented print, acrylic, and spray paint on canvas; 48 x 36 inches (121.92 x 91.44 cm). Collection of Isis Heslin and Jacqueline T. Martin. Image courtesy of Kravets | Wehby Gallery, New York, New York. © Nina Chanel Abney.

Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush, an exhibition at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, is a ten-year survey of one of the most provocative and iconoclastic artists working today. Abney is at the forefront of a generation of artists that is unapologetically revitalizing narrative figurative painting, and as a skillful story-teller, she visually articulates the complex social dynamics of contemporary urban life. Her works are informed as much by mainstream news media as they are by animated cartoons, video games, hip-hop culture, celebrity websites, and tabloid magazines. She draws on these sources to make paintings replete with figures, numbers, and words that appear to have tumbled onto the canvas with the stream-of-consciousness immediacy of text messages, pop-up windows, a Twitter feed, or the scrolling headlines of an incessant twenty-four-hour news cycle. By engaging loaded topics and controversial issues with irreverence, humor, and lampooning satire, Abney’s works are both pointed contemporary genre scenes as well as scathing commentaries on social attitudes and inequities.

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Abney poses with her work First and Last, part of the Nasher Museum’s collection and featured in the exhibition Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush. Photo by J Caldwell.

Abney’s first solo museum exhibition, Royal Flush comprises the artist’s large-scale paintings, along with smaller collages and watercolors. While her work has strong ties to important modernist forebears such as Robert Colescott, Stuart Davis, Romare Bearden, and Faith Ringgold, among others, its distinct and arresting visual articulation of the human condition is inherently suited to the rapid-fire and unceasing quality of the Digital Age. Her dense and colorful iconography, a skillful engagement with serious issues, and the provocative way in which she addresses them has brought this young artist increasing critical acclaim in the contemporary art world.

Royal Flush is on display at the Nasher Museum through July 16. The exhibition will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center (February 10–May 6, 2018) and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the California African American Museum (September 23, 2018–January 20, 2019). The final venue for the exhibition is the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York (April 7–August 4, 2019).  Learn more about the exhibition or buy the catalogue.

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Jonathan Williams, Beauty and the Beast: Joel Oppenheimer and Francine du Plessix Gray, Black Mountain College, 1951, gelatin silver print. Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center Collection. Gift of the Artist. Courtesy of Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscript Collection. Permission to reproduce courtesy of Thomas Meyer.

During its relatively brief existence (1933–1957), Black Mountain College was an experimental liberal arts college that placed the arts at the center of its curriculum. Its faculty included leading members of the American avant-garde such as Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Buckminster Fuller, Charles Olson, and Robert Creeley. While Black Mountain College is best known for its contributions to the visual arts, literature, music, and dance, Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College, curated by Julie J. Thomson, shows how photography was also an important part of the curriculum. Photography began as an informal workshop in the 1930s and was taught through 1953. Josef Albers and Hazel Larsen Archer played important roles in this, including inviting many notable photographers to teach during the college’s summer sessions.

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Nancy Newhall and Anni Albers, Untitled (Photogram), 1948, vintage gelatin silver print. ©1948, Nancy Newhall, ©2017, the Estate of Beaumont and Nancy Newhall. Permission to reproduce courtesy of Scheinbaum and Russek Ltd., Santa Fe, New Mexico. Courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

While thousands of photographs were made at Black Mountain College, there has not been a detailed examination of photography at the college. Begin to See is the first in-depth exhibition and catalog devoted to this topic. Organized around the themes of Available Light, Bearing Witness, Performing for the Camera, Experimentation, and Place, this catalog includes essays, photographer biographies, and a chronology about photography at Black Mountain College. It features over 100 photographs by more than forty artists including Josef Albers, Hazel Larsen Archer, Harry Callahan, Robert Haas, Barbara Morgan, Beaumont Newhall, Nancy Newhall, Andy Oates, Robert Rauschenberg, Aaron Siskind, Cy Twombly, Stan VanDerBeek, Susan Weil, and Jonathan Williams.

Read more about the exhibition, on display through May 20 at the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, or purchase the catalog.

Society for Cinema and Media Studies, 2017

We spent last weekend in Chicago for the 2017 Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference—it was wonderful to see authors, sell books and journals, and celebrate prize-winning books!

Allison McCracken’s Real Men Don’t Sing was a co-winner of the Best First Book Award. Birth of an Industry by Nicholas Sammond received the 2017 Award of Distinction for the Katherine Singer Kovács Book Award, and Homay King’s Virtual Memory received the 2017 Award of Distinction for the Anne Friedberg Innovative Scholarship Award. Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

In case you missed seeing our authors at the conference, we snapped a few photos:

Nicholas Sammond and Michael Boyce Gillespie

Birth of an Industry author Nicholas Sammond with Film Blackness author Michael Boyce Gillespie

Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover

Queer Cinema in the World authors Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover

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Award-winning author Homay King with Virtual Memory

Nicholas Sammond

Nicholas Sammond with his award-winning book Birth of an Industry

You can still order books from our website using the conference discount—just use coupon code SCMS17 at checkout for 30% off your order!

March Events

March is a great time to catch one of our authors at an event.

March 2: Flyboy 2 author Greg Tate will moderate a panel discussion at the Institute for Contemporary Art on “The Freedom Principle: Experiments in Art and Music, 1965 to Now”
6:30pm, 118 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Life and Death on the New York Dance FloorMarch 3: Tim Lawrence will lecture on his book, Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-1983, participate in a Q&A, and spin some records to kick off Downtownsounds DISCO-VERSARY. Lawrence heads to the US in April. Plan ahead and check out those events here.
7:00pm, Teachers Club, 36 Parnell Square West, Dublin, Ireland

March 3: Indian Given author María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo gives a talk at Duke University’s  John Hope Franklin Center.
4:30pm, John Hope Franklin Center, Room 240, 2204 Erwin Rd, Durham, NC 27705

brilliant-imperfection-coverMarch 7: See activist Eli Clare discuss “Gaping, Gawking, Staring” and his book Brilliant Imperfection at Western Washington University.
All day,  Artnzen Hall 405, 516 High Street, Bellingham, WA 98225

March 7: The editors of Collecting, Ordering, Governing will take part in a panel to launch the book at UCL Grant Museum of Zoology.
6:00pm, 21 University Street, London, WC1E 6DE, United Kingdom

March 8: The Museum of American Finance will host a discussion with Wall Street Women author Melissa Fisher and Candace Straight.
12:30pm, 48 Wall Street, New York, NY 10005

March 8: See Eli Clare, author of Brilliant Imperfection, give the keynote presentation at the Gender Studies Symposium at Lewis and Clarke College
7:00pm, Templeton Campus Center, 0615 S.W. Palatine Hill Rd. MSC 63, Portlanddecolonizing-dialectics-cover, OR 97219

March 15: Catch Decolonizing Dialectics author George Ciccariello-Maher in conversation with Carlos Martinez hosted by SoleSpace.
7:00pm, 1714 Telegraph Ave, Oakland, CA 94612

March 16: The Independent Living Resource Center will host a reading and book signing with Eli Clare and his new book, Brilliant Imperfection.
6:00 pm, 825 Howard Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

March 18: Tim Lawrence in conversation with Paul Tarpey about his book Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-1983.
5:00pm, Mother Macs978-0-8223-6316-3, 10 High Street, Limerick, Ireland

March 24: Louis Sell, author of From Washington to Moscow, joins the panel It’s Complicated: US and USSR Relations at the Virginia Festival of the Book
10:00am, UVA Bookstore, 400 Emmet Street S, Charlottesville, VA 22903

March 30: Head over to Labyrinth Books and see Lalaie Ameeriar discuss her book, Downwardly Global.
6:00pm,  122 Nassau St, Princeton, NJ 08542
Hope you can catch one of our authors at one of these great events. Follow us on Twitter and Pinterest for more events news.

American Historical Association, 2017

C1gClKkWgAAcmcK.jpgWe had a wonderful time meeting authors and selling books and journals at the 2017 American Historical Association Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado!

We were thrilled that several of our authors received awards at the conference:

C1g0062UUAErJJp.jpgNancy Rose Hunt won the Martin A. Klein Prize in Africanist History for her book A Nervous State.

Barbara Weinstein’s The Color of Modernity won the Conference on Latin American History’s Warren Dean Memorial Prize.

Christopher Boyer’s book Political Landscapes received honorable mention for this year’s Bolton-Johnson Prize for Best Book in English on Latin American History from the CLAH.

And Mary Kay Vaughan, author of Portrait of a Young Painter, won the 2016 Distinguished Service Award from the CLAH. Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

It was great to visit with authors and editors who stopped by our booth:

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Robyn Spencer, author of The Revolution Has Come

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Ernesto Bassi, center, with his book An Aqueous Territory

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Hispanic American Historical Review editor Pete Sigal

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Natasha Lightfoot stopped by to take a photo with her book Troubling Freedom–only to find it was already sold out!

Missed AHA this year? Didn’t have enough room in your suitcase for all the books you wanted? Don’t worry–you can still stock up with our 30% conference discount. Just use coupon code AHA17 during checkout at dukeupress.edu.

Congratulations to Jean Bourgain, Winner of the 2017 Breakthrough Prize for Mathematics

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Jean Bourgain

Congratulations to Jean Bourgain, an editor of Duke Mathematical Journal, winner of the 2017 Breakthrough Prize for Mathematics. The prize honors the world’s best mathematicians who have contributed to major advances in the field. The Breakthrough Foundation, founded in 2012, rewards physicists, life scientists, and mathematicians for their work on cutting edge research.

Bourgain, a mathematician at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, was awarded the prize for multiple transformative contributions to analysis, combinatorics, partial differential equations, high-dimensional geometry, and number theory. From the New York Times:

Some recent work includes a “decoupling theorem” — a sort of very abstract generalization of the Pythagorean theorem applied to oscillating waves like light or radio waves. While Pythagoras merely showed how the length of the two shorter sides of a right triangle are related to the longer hypotenuse, the decoupling theorem proven by Dr. Bourgain and Ciprian Demeter of Indiana University shows similar relationships in the superposition of waves.

Dr. Bourgain’s work published in Duke Mathematical Journal and several other journals is available on Project Euclid.

In addition to the Breakthrough Prizes, several authors have won New Horizons Prizes, $100,000 awards in physics and mathematics. The New Horizons mathematics winners include Mohammed Abouzaid of Columbia University, Hugo Duminil-Copin of the University of Geneva, and Geordie Williamson of Kyoto University. Please visit Project Euclid to find articles by these award-winners.

American Anthropological Association 2016

The weather in Minneapolis may have been a little chilly, but we had a great time meeting people, selling books and journals, and celebrating our authors at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association.

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Eben Kirksey, author of Emergent Ecologies, with editorial director Ken Wissoker

Our authors won several awards for their books. Eben Kirksey’s Emergent Ecologies won the Diana Forsythe Prize, awarded by the Society for the Anthropology of Work and the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology and Computing.

John Collins won the Leeds Award in Urban Anthropology, awarded by the Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology, for his book Revolt of the Saints.

Diane Nelson’s Who Counts? was the runner-up for the Gregory Bateson Prize by the Society for Cultural Anthropology, and Zoë Wool’s After War received honorable mention for the same prize.

James Ferguson won the Elliott P. Skinner Book Award, by the Association for Africanist Anthropology, for his book Give a Man a Fish.

Aimee Meredith Cox’s Shapeshifters won third place for the Victor Turner Book Prize in Ethnographic Writing, awarded by the Society for Humanistic Anthropology. Gastón R. Gordillo’s Rubble and Liisa H. Malkki’s The Need to Help both received honorable mention for the same prize.

Kelly Ray Knight’s addicted.pregnant.poor received honorable mention for the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Eileen Basker Memorial Prize.

Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

receptionOn Friday we enjoyed a wine and cheese reception to celebrate the launch of our series Global Insecurities, edited by Catherine Besteman and Daniel M. Goldstein.

The series currently includes Besteman’s Making Refuge, Goldstein’s Owners of the SidewalkExiled Home by Susan Bibler Coutin, and Endangered City by Austin Zeiderman.

We were glad to see so many of our authors stop by the booth. We snapped several photos:

Not able to make it out this year? Are there a few more books you wish you would have grabbed? Don’t worry—you can use the coupon code AAA16 on our website through the end of the year to stock up on our great anthropology titles for 30% off.

Building Community during University Press Week

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Welcome to University Press Week 2016! We’re so excited to participate again in this event that draws attention to the important work of nonprofit scholarly publishers. This year’s theme is “community,” so today we’re sharing some of the wonderful book displays we’ve set up at libraries and centers across Duke University and around Durham. If you’re in the area, stop by to peruse a book (or several) and pick up some free swag!

We partnered with several organizations at Duke’s John Hope Franklin Center to set up a display in their gallery. Thank you to the Africa Initiative, Asian/Pacific Studies Institute, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Concilium on Southern Africa, Islamic Studies Center, Center for International & Global Studies, Middle East Studies Center, and Global Asia Initiative!

We also had a great time working with the Center for Multicultural Affairs, located in Duke’s Bryan Center:

Stop by the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, also located in the Bryan Center, to check out the display there:

Duke’s Music Library has a special selection of our music books on display:

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And the Durham County Library has a display as well:

We also have a book display at the Nicholas School of the Environment, and you can find our books at Little Free Libraries around the city!

One of the highlights of University Press Week is the blog tour, in which presses and bookstores celebrate the work of university presses with fascinating and diverse posts, with a different theme each day. Today’s theme is “The People in Your Neighborhood.” Begin today at Northwestern University Press. Rutgers University celebrated their 250th anniversary, and Rutgers University Press played a large role in the festivities–replete with fun photos. Check out Fordham University Press for another interesting post. The University of Toronto Press publishing blog features their history editor, who recounts her experiences running lectures at a nearby Jewish Community Centre in Toronto on Why History Matters Today, which showcases a string of their higher education authors. Their sister blog, University of Toronto Press Journals, spotlights one of our journal editors and the work they are doing in their own communities related to the journal they are responsible for. Seminary Co-op Bookstores shares a curated book list of favorite University Press titles from Haun Saussy, University of Chicago faculty and Columbia University Press and Fordham University Press author. Athabasca University Press features members of their editorial committee. Be sure to return here tomorrow to continue the tour!

November Events

November is a great time to head out to local bookstores and other venues and meet our authors.

spillReaders in Durham, Montreal, and Atlanta can all catch poet Alexis Pauline Gumbs this month.
November 1: Alexis Gumbs will read from her new book Spill at The Regulator.
7:00pm, 720 Ninth Street, Durham, NC 27705

November 9:  The Concordia Centre will host a workshop Alexis Gumbs and Rachel Zellars around her book Spill.
6:00pm,  H-763, Hall Building,  1455 de Maisonneuve West, Annex V-01, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8

November 18: Spill author Alexis Gumbs will be at Charis Books to discuss her book.
7:30pm, 1189 Euclid Ave. NE, Atlanta, GA 30307

978-0-8223-5931-9November 5: Shane Greene will participate in a panel discussion at Cornell University for their Musicology Colloquium.
3:00pm, Klarman Hall Auditorium KG70, 232 East Ave, Ithaca, NY 14850

November 7: Shapeshifters author Aimee Cox will be at the University of Miami to discuss “Black Girlhood.”
12:00pm, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33143

November 10: Christina Sharpe speaks at Northwestern University on her book In the Wake.
12:00pm, Northwestern University, TGS Commons, 2122 Sheridan Road, 1st Floor, Evanston, IL 60208
Followed by a conversation with Alex Weheliye.
5:30pm, Harris Hall 108, Evanston, IL 60208

Cahan cover image, 5897-8November 12: Susan Cahan will be at Laumeier Sculpture Park to discuss and sign copies for her book Mounting Frustration.
1:00pm, 12580 Rott Road, Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63127

November 14: Susan Cahan in conversation with Lowery Stokes Sims at the Museum of Modern Art on her book Mounting Frustration.
7:00pm, Education and Research Center, Theater 3, 11 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019

November 17: Hettie Jones will discuss her new book, Love, H, at the Poets House. This is a ticketed event.
7:00pm, Kray Hall, 10 River Terrace, New York, NY 10282

November is also a huge month for conferences. Be sure to come by our booths at the National Women’s Studies Association, Society for Ethnomusicology, American Studies Association, American Anthropological Association, American Academy of Religion, American Society for Theater Research, American Society for Ethnohistory, Middle East Studies Association, and African Studies Association. Save 30% on all our titles in the booths and meet our staff members.

What is Journal Work? A Small Axe Event

ddsmx_20_2_50This year, Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism, turns 20 years old. The journal also published its 50th issue, “What is Journal Work?” which features a preface by editor David Scott on Small Axe and the ethos of journal work.

In celebration of its 20th year and 50th issue, Small Axe is marking the occasion with a roundtable conversation on journal work featuring the contributors to the 50th issue. The speakers are editors (or founders) of notable journal platforms and will discuss ways to think about the distinctive work—in all its dimensions—of journals in intellectual and artistic innovation and intervention.

Small Axe would like to extend the invitation for anyone to join on Friday, 16 September 2016 from 1:00 to 6:30pm at Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd floor, Barnard Hall, Barnard College. Barnard Hall is located immediately upon entering through the main gate of the Barnard College campus at Broadway and 117th Street. If you cannot attend in person, the event will be streamed live.

There are two parts to the Small Axe celebration: part one will be a roundtable conversation and part two will feature a number of people speaking about the contribution of Small Axe over the twenty years of its existence. See the full schedule:

Part 1: Roundtable Program
What is Journal Work? A Conversation

WIJW-POSTER1:00-1:30pm
Welcome: Vanessa Pérez-Rosario, managing editor, Small Axe
Opening Remarks: David Scott, Small Axe

1:30-3:30pm
Moderator: Vanessa Agard-Jones, Small Axe, Souls

Participants:
Louis Chude-Sokei, The Black Scholar
Lowell Fiet, Sargasso
Kaiama L. Glover and Alex Gil, sx: archipelagos
Sean Jacobs, Africa is a Country
Kelly Baker Josephs, sx salon
Patricia Saunders, Anthurium
Ashwani Sharma, darkmatter
Kuan-Hsing Chen, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies: Movements
Yolanda Wood, Anales del Caribe

Part 2: Small Axe Celebration

3:45-5:15pm
Moderator: Nijah Cunningham, coordinator, Small Axe Project

Participants:
Hazel Carby, Yale University
Silvio Torres-Saillant, Syracuse University, Latino Studies Journal
Brent Hayes Edwards, Columbia University

5:20pm
Closing remarks: David Scott, Small Axe

5:30-6:30pm
Reception

Postcard from Columbus: Kendall McKenzie attends IFLA 2016

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Library Sales Specialist Kendall McKenzie is attending the 2016 International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress in Columbus, Ohio, from August 13-19. We recently sat down with Kendall to chat about what she wants to learn from librarians, what she is excited to talk to attendees about, and what she is most interested in eating while visiting The Biggest Small Town in America.

What are the things you’d like to talk to IFLA attendees about?

I’m excited to talk about our two new e-book subject collections: the Latin American Studies collection and the Gender Studies collection. These subject collections are great resources for specialty schools or schools with a strong program in either Latin American studies or gender studies. I’d love to hear from librarians about their experience and thoughts when assessing a subject collection, and would appreciate any and all feedback. Oftentimes with our e-Duke Books and e-Duke Journal collections, we might be in conversation with universities, so I think we’ll have more chances to work with a full range of schools, including community colleges and specialty libraries.

What do you want to learn from librarians?

I’d like to talk about our open-access offerings, including Project Euclid, Environmental Humanities, and the Carlyle Letters Online. We want to learn what librarians would like to see for the future of open access in the humanities. I’d also be interested to hear about what kind of models for evidence-driven acquisitions (EDA) librarians have used and really like. And of course, I’d love to learn how international libraries are structured, and what kinds of content interests them.

What are you planning to do and see while you’re in Columbus?

I am most excited about walking around the city and taking a ton of photos. I like to try to be really subtle and not look like a tourist but still explore the city. I’m also really looking forward to the restaurants. I hear there’s a hot dog place that I have to try—Dirty Frank’s Hot Dog Palace—that has a hot dog called Sarva’s Tot-cho Dog. It’s smothered in tater tots, cheese sauce, jalapeños, and onions. It looks delicious. The German Village Historic District is close to downtown and is full of restaurants and bakeries—I hope to visit and walk around.

Will you be attending IFLA 2016? Stop by and see Kendall at Booth E107 in Hall D during the conference.

The World Library and Information Congress is held each year in a different region of the world. 2016 marks the congress’ return to the US for the first time since 2001. Follow along with the 2016 IFLA congress on Facebook and Twitter. We’re looking forward to attending IFLA 2017 in Wrocław, Poland next year!