Events

American Anthropological Association 2017

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Booth staffers ready to go on the first day

The 2017 American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., was a great chance for us to meet authors and editors, sell books and journals to excited customers, and celebrate prize-winning books!

Our authors racked up quite a few awards at this year’s conference:

Metabolic Living by Harris Solomon and Tell Me Why My Children Died by Charles Briggs and Clara Mantini-Briggs were co-winners of the New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology.

Sareeta Amrute’s Encoding Race, Encoding Class won the Diana Forsythe Prize from the Committee for the Anthropology of Science, Technology & Computing. Plastic Bodies by Emilia Sanabria received honorable mention for this prize.

Emilia Sanabria’s Plastic Bodies also won the Michelle Rosaldo First Book Prize from the Association for Feminist Anthropology. Downwardly Global by Lalaie Ameeriar was a finalist for the same prize.

Aimee Meredith Cox’s Shapeshifters won the Delmos Jones & Jagna Sharff Memorial Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of North America.

The Look of a Woman by Eric Plemons won the Ruth Benedict Prize in the Single-Authored Monograph category from the Association for Queer Anthropology.

Yolanda Covington-Ward’s Gesture and Power won the Elliott P. Skinner Award from the Association for Africanist Anthropology.

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João Biehl toasts new edited collection Unfinished

Reel World by Anand Pandian won second place for the Victor Turner Prize from the Society for Humanistic Anthropology, and David McDermott Hughes’s Energy without Conscience received honorable mention for the same prize.

Everyday Conversions by Attiya Ahmad received honorable mention for the Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion.

Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

On Friday we enjoyed a wine reception for the new collection Unfinished: The Anthropology of Becoming with its editors João Biehl and Peter Locke.

It was exciting to see so many of our authors and editors in person. Check out the photo gallery:

 

Did you miss AAA this year? Not enough room in your luggage to carry all the books and journals you wanted? You can still take advantage of our 30% conference discount—just use coupon code AAA17 on our website through January 15.

American Studies Association, 2017

We had a great time meeting authors and editors and selling books and journals at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Studies Association in Chicago this weekend.

Saldana PortilloA huge congratulations to María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo whose book Indian Given: Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States won the 2017 John Hope Franklin prize honoring the most outstanding book published in American Studies in 2016.

chris in tshirtWe were excited to sell our very first t-shirts at the meeting. Look for Feminist Killjoy and TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly shirts for sale on our website soon if you missed them at the meeting. We’ll also have them for sale at several other fall conferences.

As always, we enjoyed having authors and editors pose with their publications in the booth.

 


If you missed the conference, or if your favorite title sold out before you could buy it, don’t despair, you can still order them from our website for 30% off with coupon code ASA17.

University Press Week: #Twitterstorm

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Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is #TwitterStorm, featuring posts about how authors and university presses use social media to spread their messages. Check out the video above to see our author Lynn Comella discuss how she considers social media a form of activism. Then head over to Harvard University Press to get a look at how social media has played a role in the publication of Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide. Next, Greg Britton, Editorial Director of Johns Hopkins University Press, extols the virtues of Twitter. Athabasca University Press showcases how they utilized social media channels to create a citywide book club. Finally, a post from Beacon Press demonstrates how social media has helped advertise and keep conversation going about Christopher Edmin’s For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too.

Come back tomorrow for a great Veterans Day post from us and more from the University Press Week blog tour. And keep sharing your love for university presses on social media with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

University Press Week: Producing the Books that Matter

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Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is Producing the Books that Matter. Visit University of Kansas Press to learn about how editorial and production departments work together to create books. Then head to University of Michigan Press for an interview with Jay Timothy Dolmage, author of their upcoming book Academic Ableism. David Goodwin will talk about the production of his book Left Bank of the Hudson, which was published this Fall by Fordham University Press. At University of Washington Press, their press director and president of the AAUP, Nicole Mitchell, will write about the value of university presses. Yale University Press will be featuring an episode of their podcast on the making of the Voynich Manuscript. UBC Press offers a post on the challenges and rewards of working closely with an author to develop a book for a general rather than a scholarly audience. University of California Press and Georgetown University Press are also participating.

Check back here tomorrow for more great blog posts and don’t forget to share your love for university presses online with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

University Press Week 2017: Knowledge Matters

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It’s University Press Week! University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society. We’ll be celebrating with displays at the Durham County Library‘s South Regional branch, the Hayti Heritage Center, North Carolina Central University library, and around Duke University’s campus at the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Music Library, the Office for Faculty Advancement, the John Hope Franklin Center, the Nicholas School of the Environment, and the Center for Multicultural Affairs. If you’re in Durham please stop by and check out some of our recent titles and pick up a free bookmark, pen, or magnet.

This year’s University Press Week Theme is #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters. In today’s political climate—where “fake news” and “alternate facts” are believed by so many people—valuing expertise and knowledge can feel like a radical act. University presses not only believe in facts and knowledge, but traffic in them daily, publishing approximately 14,000 books and more than 1,100 journals each year, read by people around the globe.

We launched our “Read to Respond” series to highlight some of our own groundbreaking scholarship that engages with today’s pressing issues. Each topic, from student activism to racial justice, is highlighted with a reading list that encourages students and teachers alike to join the conversation surrounding these current events. Check out your favorite “Read to Respond” topics below and share these resources in and out of the classroom. These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017.

We now encourage you to learn more about the important work of university presses by checking out the week-long blog tour. Each day has a different theme and will feature posts by five-ten different presses. Today’s theme is Scholarship Making a Difference. Begin at Temple University Press for a post on scholarship on racism and whiteness. Then head to Wayne State University Press to read about their upcoming book on slavery in 21st-century America. University Press of Colorado has a feature on their post-truth focused titles. At Princeton University Press, Al Bertrand writes on the importance of non-partisan peer reviewed social science in today’s political climate. George Mason University Press offers a post on the path to discovery of an overlooked and misunderstood yet influential historical figure, William Playfair. At University of Toronto Press, their history editor in higher education discusses the importance of making scholarship accessible to students and the role of publishers in helping to build better citizens. Wilfrid Laurier University Press offers a roundup of their Indigenous scholarship with commentary from the series editor about its importance. Oregon State University Press  Finally, stop at Cambridge University Press to see their post.

Check back here each day to see the stops on the blog tour and our own University Press Week posts. Don’t forget to share with the hashtags #ReadUP and #LookItUP!

Author Events in November

Many of our authors are out giving talks and holding book signings in November. Hope you get a chance to see them in person this month.

The Right to Maim

November 2: Alex Hinton will speak about his recent book Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer at the USC Shoah Foundation.
4:00 pm, Social Sciences Building, Room 250, 3502 Trousdale Parkway, Los Angeles, CA 90089

November 3: The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University will host a panel discussion for Jasbir Puar’s new book The Right to Maim.
5:00 pm, NYU, 19 West 4th Street, room 101, New York, NY 10003

November 6: Several Duke University Press authors are participating in the Duke on Gender Colloquium. The theme is “Marxism, Socialism, Feminism: A Transnational Conversation.” Catch Kristen Ghodsee, author of Red Hangover; Rebecca Karl, author of The Magic of Concepts; and Kathi Weeks, author of The Problem with Work; along with Lisa Disch and Anna Krylova.
3:00 pm, East Duke Parlors, 1304 Campus Drive, Durham, NC 27708

November 7: The War on Sex co-editor Trevor Hoppe will participate in a panel discussion at St. Francis College on the criminalization of sex.
11:10 am, Room 3212, 180 Remsen St, Brooklyn, NY 11201

November 13: Mikael Wolfe will discuss his new book Watering the Revolution at the University of Oregon.
3:30 pm, Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Spruce Room, 1395 University Street, Eugene, OR 97403

November 13: Vibrator Nation author Lynn Comella will lecture at the University of Michigan on “Sex Toys and Social Entrepreneurship.”
4:00 pm, 204 State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

November 14:  The Sarasota Museum of Art will host Susan Cahan in a talk about her book Mounting Frustration.
5:30 pm, TICKETED EVENT, The Works, 891 South Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL 34236

November 14: Get a signed copy of Vibrator Nation when Lynn Comella visits Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor.
7:30 pm, 124 E. Washington, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

978-0-8223-7034-5November 16: Lauren Pond comes to Duke University to launch her new book Test of Faith, the eighth winner of the Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize.
5:30 pm, Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708

November 16: David F. Garcia will talk at Howard University about his book, Listening for Africa.
12:30 pm, Childers Recital Hall, Room 3001, 2455 Sixth Street NW, Washington, DC 20059

art1November 16: If you’re in Baltimore, stop by Sugar and see Vibrator Nation author Lynn Comella, and get a signed copy.
6:30 pm, 927 W. 36th St., Baltimore, MD 21211

November 17:  Lynn Comella continues her tour, stopping at The Potter’s House to discuss her book Vibrator Nation.
6:30 pm, 1658 Columbia Rd. NW, Washington, District of Columbia 20009

November 18: If you missed Lynn Comella in DC, no problem, see her at Lotus Blooms in Virginia, and get your copy of Vibrator Nation.
8:30pm, 1017 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314

November 20: University of Chicago will host a New Book Salon for Kaushik Sunder Rajan’s book Pharmocracy at Seminary Co-op bookstore.
6:00 pm, 5751 South Woodlawn Ave., Chicago, IL, 60637

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November 20: Listening to Images author Tina Campt will give a talk at New York University’s Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality.
6:00 pm, 285 Mercer St, New York, NY 10003

November 28: Scuppernong Books will host a reading of Lending Power with author Howard E. Covington Jr.
7:00 pm, 304 S Elm St, Greensboro, NC 27401

November 28: Sally Price, co-author of Saamaka Dreaming, will give a talk entitled “One Tradition, Two Stories: An Art Historical/Anthropological Dilemma” at Johns Hopkins University.
6:30 pm, 210 Hodson Hall, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218

November 29: Louise Meintjes will talk about her new book Dust of the Zulu at Book Culture.
7:00 pm, 536 W 112th St., New York, NY 10025

Author Events Coming Up in October

From London to San Francisco, October is packed with great author events, including several California appearances by Lynn Comella, author of Vibrator Nation. Not on the West Coast? Check out her other upcoming tour dates.

Lending PowerOctober 4: Howard Covington is joined by Self-Help Credit Union founder Martin Eakes at Durham’s The Regulator Bookshop for a discussion of Covington’s new book Lending Power: How Self-Help Credit Union Turned Small-Time Loans into Big-Time Change.
7:00 pm, 720 Ninth Street, Durham, NC 27705

October 5: Catch Lynn Comella discussing her book Vibrator Nation with sex educator Tristan Taormino at The Pleasure Chest.
8:00 pm, 7733 Santa Monica Blvd.,West Hollywood, CA 90046

October 7: Too Young for What? Celebrate the creativity of Jean-Michel Basquiat at London’s Barbican along with with Tim Lawrence, author of Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-1983. He’ll curate a program of short films evocative of the fertile, renegade spirit of New York culture in the late 70s and early 80s.
Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

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October 8: The San Francisco Litquake Festival will host a discussion of Vibrator Nation with author Lynn Comella and Dr. Carol Queen.
6:00 pm, The Center for Sex and Culture, 1349 Mission, San Francisco, CA 94103

October 12: Catch Howard Covington, author of Lending Power, at Greensboro’s Scuppernong Books.
7:00 pm, 304 S. Elm St., GreensboroNC 27401

October 13: See South of Pico author, Kellie Jones, at the Tate Modern for day-long conference on Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power exhibition.
10:30 am, Starr Cinema, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

October 14: Reina Lewis will discuss “Modest Fashion in a Modern World” and her book, Muslim Fashion, at The Nook for the Cheltenham Literature Festival.
1:00 pm, Montpellier Gardens, Cheltenham, GL50 1UL

October 17: I Love My Selfie author Ilan Stavans will host a screening of Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2 at Amherst Cinema.
7:00 pm, 28 Amity St., Amherst, MA

October 17: With the The Click! Photography Festival happening this month, The Regulator Bookshop will host Julie J. Thomson, editor of Begin to See, discussing the photographers of Black Mountain College.
7:00pm, 720 Ninth Street, Durham, NC 27705

October 18: Living a Feminist Life author Sara Ahmed will give a talk at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro.978-0-8223-6319-4
4:30 pm, EUC Maple Room, 1400 Spring Garden Street, Greensboro, NC 27402

October 19: Michael Gillespie will introduce a screening of Deep Cover at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, a film he discusses in his book Film Blackness.
7:00 pm, 30 Lafayette Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217

October 21: Another chance to see lively discussion with Lynn Comella on her book, Vibrator Nation, at Babeland Seattle.
7:00pm, 707 E. Pike Street, Seattle, WA 98122

October 26: Get your copy of Vibrator Nation signed at Lynn Comella’s talk at The Gallery Bookshop.
6:30 pm, 319 Kasten Street, Mendocino, CA 95460

October 28: Good Vibrations in Palo Alto will host Lynn Comella where she’ll talk about her book Vibrator Nation.
4:00 pm, 534 Ramona Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301

October 29: Oakland fans have a chance to see Lynn Comella discuss Vibrator Nation at their Good Vibrations location.
3:00 pm, 3219 Lakeshore Ave, Oakland, CA 94610

Summer Events

Summer is upon us and we have some great book events coming up. Beat the heat by checking out our authors at these readings and talks.

Rwandan Women RisingJune 7: Tony Bennett, co-author of Collecting, Ordering, Governing will participate in a panel discussion at the Australian Museum. Note that this is a ticketed event.
6:00pm, 1 William Street, Sydney, NSW 2010 Australia

June 13: Cambridge Forum welcomes Ambassador Swanee Hunt for a discussion of her book Rwandan Women Rising.
7:00pm, First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

June 22-25: The Barbican Centre will honor film critic B. Ruby Rich, author of New Queer Cinema and Chick Flicks, with a series of panels and screenings entitled “Being Ruby Rich.”
Cinema 2, Silk Street, London, EC2Y 8DS

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June 26: Swanee Hunt discusses Rwandan Women Rising at the United States Institute for Peace.
TBA, 2301 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037

July 22: Hear John Corbett reading from his new book Vinyl Freak at Chicago’s Seminary Coop. This is one you’ll want to buy early: the first printing contains a limited-edition flexidisc featuring a never-before-released track by Sun Ra.
TBA, 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave., Chicago 60637

July 24: It’s New York’s chance to catch John Corbett and buy Vinyl Freak at McNally Jackson bookstore.
TBA, 52 Prince Street, New York, NY 10012

July 27: Swanee Hunt will discuss her new book Rwandan Women Rising at the Tattered Cover bookstore in Denver.
7:00pm, 2526 E Colfax Ave, Denver, CO 80206

We hope you can make it to an event near you soon.

Exhibitions and Spring Art Books

This spring, we’re distributing three gorgeous art books that correspond with exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum, the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, and the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center. We’re happy to extend the reach of these important and beautifully designed catalogues, published by each respective museum, and we hope you can make it out to an exhibition or two.

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Faith Ringgold (American, born 1930). For the Women’s House, 1971. Oil on canvas, 96 x 96 in. (243.8 x 243.8 cm). Courtesy of Rose M. Singer Center, Rikers Island Correctional Center. © 2017 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

A landmark exhibition on display at the Brooklyn Museum through September 17, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85 examines the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism. It showcases the work of black women artists such as Emma Amos, Maren Hassinger, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, and Betye Saar, making it one of the first major exhibitions to highlight the voices and experiences of women of color. In so doing, it reorients conversations around race, feminism, political action, art production, and art history in this significant historical period.

The accompanying Sourcebook republishes an array of rare and little-known documents from the period by artists, writers, cultural critics, and art historians such as Gloria Anzaldúa, James Baldwin, bell hooks, Lucy R. Lippard, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Lowery Stokes Sims, Alice Walker, and Michelle Wallace. These documents include articles, manifestos, and letters from significant publications as well as interviews, some of which are reproduced in facsimile form. The Sourcebook also includes archival materials, rare ephemera, and an art-historical overview essay. Helping readers to move beyond standard narratives of art history and feminism, this volume will ignite further scholarship while showing the true breadth and diversity of black women’s engagement with art, the art world, and politics from the 1960s to the 1980s.

We Wanted a Revolution is curated by Catherine Morris and Rujeko Hockley. In addition to the Brooklyn Museum, it will also be on display at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles from October 13, 2017, through January 14, 2018; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, from February 17, 2018, through May 27, 2018; and the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston from June 26, 2018, through September 30, 2018. Find more details about the exhibition or purchase the Sourcebook.

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Nina Chanel Abney, Incite (COM), 2015. Unique ultrachrome pigmented print, acrylic, and spray paint on canvas; 48 x 36 inches (121.92 x 91.44 cm). Collection of Isis Heslin and Jacqueline T. Martin. Image courtesy of Kravets | Wehby Gallery, New York, New York. © Nina Chanel Abney.

Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush, an exhibition at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, is a ten-year survey of one of the most provocative and iconoclastic artists working today. Abney is at the forefront of a generation of artists that is unapologetically revitalizing narrative figurative painting, and as a skillful story-teller, she visually articulates the complex social dynamics of contemporary urban life. Her works are informed as much by mainstream news media as they are by animated cartoons, video games, hip-hop culture, celebrity websites, and tabloid magazines. She draws on these sources to make paintings replete with figures, numbers, and words that appear to have tumbled onto the canvas with the stream-of-consciousness immediacy of text messages, pop-up windows, a Twitter feed, or the scrolling headlines of an incessant twenty-four-hour news cycle. By engaging loaded topics and controversial issues with irreverence, humor, and lampooning satire, Abney’s works are both pointed contemporary genre scenes as well as scathing commentaries on social attitudes and inequities.

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Abney poses with her work First and Last, part of the Nasher Museum’s collection and featured in the exhibition Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush. Photo by J Caldwell.

Abney’s first solo museum exhibition, Royal Flush comprises the artist’s large-scale paintings, along with smaller collages and watercolors. While her work has strong ties to important modernist forebears such as Robert Colescott, Stuart Davis, Romare Bearden, and Faith Ringgold, among others, its distinct and arresting visual articulation of the human condition is inherently suited to the rapid-fire and unceasing quality of the Digital Age. Her dense and colorful iconography, a skillful engagement with serious issues, and the provocative way in which she addresses them has brought this young artist increasing critical acclaim in the contemporary art world.

Royal Flush is on display at the Nasher Museum through July 16. The exhibition will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center (February 10–May 6, 2018) and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the California African American Museum (September 23, 2018–January 20, 2019). The final venue for the exhibition is the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York (April 7–August 4, 2019).  Learn more about the exhibition or buy the catalogue.

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Jonathan Williams, Beauty and the Beast: Joel Oppenheimer and Francine du Plessix Gray, Black Mountain College, 1951, gelatin silver print. Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center Collection. Gift of the Artist. Courtesy of Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscript Collection. Permission to reproduce courtesy of Thomas Meyer.

During its relatively brief existence (1933–1957), Black Mountain College was an experimental liberal arts college that placed the arts at the center of its curriculum. Its faculty included leading members of the American avant-garde such as Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Buckminster Fuller, Charles Olson, and Robert Creeley. While Black Mountain College is best known for its contributions to the visual arts, literature, music, and dance, Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College, curated by Julie J. Thomson, shows how photography was also an important part of the curriculum. Photography began as an informal workshop in the 1930s and was taught through 1953. Josef Albers and Hazel Larsen Archer played important roles in this, including inviting many notable photographers to teach during the college’s summer sessions.

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Nancy Newhall and Anni Albers, Untitled (Photogram), 1948, vintage gelatin silver print. ©1948, Nancy Newhall, ©2017, the Estate of Beaumont and Nancy Newhall. Permission to reproduce courtesy of Scheinbaum and Russek Ltd., Santa Fe, New Mexico. Courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

While thousands of photographs were made at Black Mountain College, there has not been a detailed examination of photography at the college. Begin to See is the first in-depth exhibition and catalog devoted to this topic. Organized around the themes of Available Light, Bearing Witness, Performing for the Camera, Experimentation, and Place, this catalog includes essays, photographer biographies, and a chronology about photography at Black Mountain College. It features over 100 photographs by more than forty artists including Josef Albers, Hazel Larsen Archer, Harry Callahan, Robert Haas, Barbara Morgan, Beaumont Newhall, Nancy Newhall, Andy Oates, Robert Rauschenberg, Aaron Siskind, Cy Twombly, Stan VanDerBeek, Susan Weil, and Jonathan Williams.

Read more about the exhibition, on display through May 20 at the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, or purchase the catalog.

Society for Cinema and Media Studies, 2017

We spent last weekend in Chicago for the 2017 Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference—it was wonderful to see authors, sell books and journals, and celebrate prize-winning books!

Allison McCracken’s Real Men Don’t Sing was a co-winner of the Best First Book Award. Birth of an Industry by Nicholas Sammond received the 2017 Award of Distinction for the Katherine Singer Kovács Book Award, and Homay King’s Virtual Memory received the 2017 Award of Distinction for the Anne Friedberg Innovative Scholarship Award. Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

In case you missed seeing our authors at the conference, we snapped a few photos:

Nicholas Sammond and Michael Boyce Gillespie

Birth of an Industry author Nicholas Sammond with Film Blackness author Michael Boyce Gillespie

Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover

Queer Cinema in the World authors Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover

Homay King

Award-winning author Homay King with Virtual Memory

Nicholas Sammond

Nicholas Sammond with his award-winning book Birth of an Industry

You can still order books from our website using the conference discount—just use coupon code SCMS17 at checkout for 30% off your order!