Events

Virtual Events in November

There are many great ways to meet our authors online in November. We hope you can attend one of these virtual events. Note that we have included the local time zone for each event; please adjust for your own geographic location.

Influx and EffluxNovember 3, 12 pm EST: Duke University Press will host a panel discussion on Jane Bennett’s book Influx and Efflux, featuring Kathy Ferguson, Emily A. Parker, Bernd Herzogenrath, Derek McCormack and Peter M. Coviello. Register here.

November 5, 7 pm EST: The National Museum of African American History and Culture sponsors an event featuring Maureen Mahon, author of the new book Black Diamond Queens, in conversation with NPR’s Ann Powers. The event will be streamed on the NPR Music YouTube channel.

November 6, 9:30 am EST: Fadi A. Bardawil, author of Revolution and Disenchantment, gives a talk entitled “Overcoming Theory’s Resistances: Translating Arab Revolutions Past and Present,” sponsored by Duke University’s Islamic Studies Center and Franklin Humanities Institute.

November 6, 5:00 pm EST: Brigitte Fielder, author of Relative Races, joins three other scholars for a celebration of new and noteworthy books by members of the Civil War Caucus of the Modern Language Association.

November 10, 12 pm EST: Dr. Louise Amoore presents her new book, Cloud Ethics: Algorithms and the Attributes of Ourselves and Others in an event hosted by the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology at Concordia.blackdiamondqueens

November 10, 5 pm EST: Tune into a roundtable discussion about Latinx Art by Arlene Dávila. This event is sponsored by the NYU Center for the Humanities and the Latinx Project.

November 11, 3 pm EST: The University of Virginia’s Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures sponsors a talk by Joanne Rappaport, author of Cowards Don’t Make History, in which she will discuss the impact of research on liberation and its emancipatory power.

November 11, 7:30 pm EST: Maureen Mahon joins Bridgette Davis for a conversation about Mahon’s new book Black Diamond Queens, in an event sponsored by Greenlight Bookstore.

November 12, 3:30 pm CST: Samantha Pinto, author of Infamous Bodies, discusses her book with Jennifer Nash, author of Black Feminism Reimagined, in an event sponsored by the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies at the University of Texas.

Resource RadicalsNovember 13, 12 pm EST: Thea Riofrancos will present her new book, Resource Radicals, in an event sponsored by the Rhodes Center and Climate Solutions Lab at Brown University.

November 14, 2 pm EST: Join author Ronak K. Kapadia and panelists Jodi Kim, Keith P. Feldman, Sara Mameni, and Kareem Khubchandani for a one-year publication anniversary celebration of Kapadia’s book Insurgent Aesthetics.

November 20, 10 pm EST: Watch a roundtable discussion, featuring Lyle Fearnley, author of Virulent Zones, and Saiba Varma, author of The Occupied Clinic, about the therapeutic politics of care. Sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute.

We also encourage you to check out our In Conversation video series on YouTube. Recent videos include Senior Executive Editor Ken Wissoker speaking with Vanessa Díaz about her book Manufacturing Celebrity and Assistant Editor Joshua Gutterman Tranen talking with Ricardo Montez about his book Keith Haring’s Line.

Online Events in October

There are so many great ways to (virtually) see our authors in October. Note that we have included the local time zone for each event; please adjust for your own geographic location.

Insurgent

October 1, 6 pm EDT: Join Arlene Dávila, author of Latinx Art, as she discusses representation of Latinx art and artists in today’s world with Adriana Zavala at an event sponsored by the Whitney Museum of Art.

October 1, 7 pm EDT: The Swerve Conversation Series, sponsored by the Dedalus Foundation and Denniston Hill, will feature Fred Moten, the author of the consent not to be a single being trilogy: Black and Blur, Stolen Life, and The Universal Machine.  Tune in via Instagram Live here.

October 2, 3:30 pm CDT: The Center for 21st Century Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee will host Ronak K. Kapadia. He draws connections to his book Insurgent Aesthetics, which examines artistic responses to US domination in the Middle East. 

October 3, 7:00 pm WIT: Todd Henry, editor of Queer Korea, joins Hendri Yulius Wijaya for a talk sponsored by Jakarta’s Transit Bookstore.

October 4, 8 pm EDT: The Brooklyn Book Festival will take place virtually and feature a full day of programming with nearly 100 authors, including Maureen Mahon. She will speak about her book, Black Diamond Queens, and power of music to enact change.

October 5, 5 pm CEST: Daisuke Miyao will discuss his book Japonisme and the Birth of Cinema and Marsha Gordon and Allyson Nadia Field, co-editors of Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film, will talk about their book during the online Pordenone Silent Film Festival.

Resource RadicalsOctober 9, 3:30 pm CDT: Listen to Thea Riofrancos discusses her new book Resource Radicals with George Ciccariello-Maher, author of Decolonizing Dialectics, and co-editor of the Radical Américas series, of which Riofrancos’s book is a part. This event is hosted by the Center for 21st Century Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

October 14, 12 pm PDT: Judith Madera, author of Black Atlas, gives a talk entitled “Black Worldmaking and the Radical Histories of Black Geography.” This event is sponsored by JourneysRussianEmpireWa Na Wari and the Seattle Public Library.

October 15, 11 am HST: Nandita Sharma discusses her book Home Rule with The Polis Project.

October 21, 7 pm CDT: The Museum of Russian Art in Minneapolis will be hosting William Craft Brumfield to discuss his new book Journeys through the Russian Empire, in which he juxtaposes his own photos of architecture in Russia with those of early-twentieth-century photographer Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky.

October 28, 4 pm MDT: Margaret Randall, author of I Never Left Home, speaks with Gioconda Bello. This conversation is organized by the University of New Mexico. Register here.

 

In Conversation: Contributors to Writing Anthropology

We invite you to view our newest In Conversation video, featuring contributors to the new book Writing Anthropology: Essays on Craft and Commitment. Join the volume’s editor Carole McGranahan, Duke University Press Senior Executive Editor Ken Wissoker, and contributors Bianca Williams, Anand Pandian, and Katerina Teaiwa as they discuss pathways for doing anthropology differently and the relationship between writing, community, and accountability.

Online Events in September

Although you can’t see them in person, there are many opportunities to catch our authors at online events in September.

manufactuing-celebritySeptember 4, 12 pm EDT: Vanessa Díaz, author of  Manufacturing Celebrity,  will be joined in conversation by Jonathan Rosa at an event sponsored by Harvard Bookstore.

September 4, 9 pm EDT: Margaret Randall and Cedar Sigo discuss Randall’s recent memoir I Never Left Home in an event sponsored by Elliott Bay Book Company

September 16, 4 pm CDT: Katina Rogers will participate in an online conversation about her book Putting the Humanities PhD to Work. This event is sponsored by the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies with support from Humanities for the Public Good; Prairie Lights Bookstore; and The Futures Initiative, and The Graduate Center, CUNY.

978-1-4780-0945-0September 17, 12 pm EDT: Arlene Dávila discusses her new book Latinx Art in an online talk sponsored by CARGC UPenn

September 21, 6:30 pm EDT: Intellectual Publics sponsors an online conversation between Arlene Dávila and Patricia Banks.

September 22, 2 pm EDT:  Difficult Objects: A Transnational Feminist Book Conversation. Moderated by Samantha Pinto, author of Infamous Bodies, this conversation features Simidele Dosekun, Durba Mitra, and Laura Hyun Yi Kang, author of Traffic in Asian Women, talking about their recent books and transnational feminist methodologies.

We hope you can tune in to some of these great talks. Keep up with all our author events on our Twitter feed.

New Titles in Science Studies

SocialMediaforConferences_Blog_4SThis year the annual meeting of the Society for the Social Studies of Science (4S) was to be held in Prague. Like most academic conferences, it has moved online. We are pleased to partner with Combined Academic Publishers to showcase new work in science studies. Customers in the UK, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia can shop their site and save 30% off new titles with coupon code CSF20EASST. Customers in the US, Canada, and Latin America can save at our own site using coupon 4S2020. You’ll also want to check out the giveaway opportunity at CAP’s site for a chance to win a copy of Fractivism by Sarah Ann Wylie!

978-0-8223-7124-3_prSeveral of our authors will be participating in online panels. Noemi Tousignant, author of Edges of Exposure, is presenting a paper entitled “Mutagenic Residues of Senegal’s Peanut Export Economy.” Juno Salazar Parreñas, author of Decolonizing Extinction, is presenting a paper called “Geriatric Ex-Dairy Cows: Caring for Otherwise Expendable Life.” Kalindi Vora, co-author of Surrogate Humanity, has organized a panel entitled “Teaching interdependent agency I: Feminist STS approaches to STEM pedagogy,” and is presenting a paper called “Teaching Technoscience Infrastructures of Care.” And Noah Tamarkin, whose book Genetic Afterlives will be out next month, is presenting a paper entitled “Locating Controversy in Established Technoscience: Debating National DNA Databases in South Africa.”

Wild Blue MediaWe hope you’ll check out these recent titles that we would have enjoyed showing off to you in our booth. In Anaesthetics of Existence, Cressida J. Heyes draws on examples of things that happen to us but are nonetheless excluded from experience, as well as critical phenomenology, genealogy, and feminist theory, showing how and why experience has edges, and analyzes phenomena that press against them.  In Rock | Water | Life Lesley Green examines the interwoven realities of inequality, racism, colonialism, and environmental destruction in South Africa. In Wild Blue Media, Melody Jue destabilizes terrestrial-based ways of knowing and reorients our perception of the world by considering the ocean itself as a media environment—a place where the weight and opacity of seawater transforms how information is created, stored, transmitted, and perceived.

An Ecology of KnowledgesWe have a number of recent books that engage with agriculture and resource extraction in Latin America, placing the non-human at the center of their studies. Vital Decomposition by Kristina M. Lyons presents an ethnography of human-soil relations in Colombia. In An Ecology of Knowledges, Micha Rahder examines how technoscience, endemic violence, and an embodied love of wild species and places shape conservation practices in Guatemala. Kregg Hetherington’s The Government of Beans is about the rough edges of environmental regulation in Paraguay, where tenuous state power and blunt governmental instruments encounter ecological destruction and social injustice. Seeds of Power by Amalia Leguizamón explores why Argentines largely support GM soy despite the widespread damage it creates. In Resource Radicals, Thea Riofrancos looks at Ecuador, expanding the study of resource politics by decentering state resource policy and locating it in a field of political struggle populated by actors with conflicting visions of resource extraction. And in Bolivia in the Age of Gas, Bret Gustafson explores how the struggle over natural gas has reshaped Bolivia, along with the rise, and ultimate fall, of the country’s first Indigenous-led government. Look for an online conversation about these issues featuring Riofrancos, Gustafson, Hetherington, and Leguizamón later this fall.

Also examining agriculture, Alex Blanchette’s Porkopolis immerses readers into the workplaces that underlie modern meat, from slaughterhouses and corporate offices to artificial insemination barns and bone-rendering facilities, outlining the deep human-hog relationships and intimacies that emerge through intensified industrialization. Check out Blanchette’s recent conversation with Senior Executive Editor Ken Wissoker.

One of our favorite conference traditions is the in-booth selfies that our authors often take with their books. We can’t do that this year, so we’ve asked some of our science studies authors to send them in. Check out our book selfie album on Facebook or look for the photos on Twitter this week.

Save on these and all our science studies titles on our site with coupon 4S2020 (North and South America, Caribbean) or at Combined Academic Publishers with coupon CSF20EASST (UK, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia).

Also check out Environmental Humanities, a peer-reviewed open-access journal that draws humanities disciplines into conversation with the natural and social sciences around significant environmental issues. Start reading here.

We invite you to return to the blog tomorrow to read a message from Executive Editor Courtney Berger.

New Books and Journals in Sociology

SocialMediaforConferences_Blog_ASocA

August marks the beginning of the fall conference season, when we usually look forward to greeting authors and editors at our booths. Unfortunately, most conferences have been cancelled for the rest of 2020 or have gone online only. The American Sociological Association will hold its online meeting August 8-11. Although we can’t greet you in person at our booth, we invite you check out our web page for the conference and peruse our sociology catalog. You can save 30% on all books and journal issues using coupon code ASOCA20.

Editor Elizabeth Ault was supposed to attend ASA for the first time this year. Instead, she offers you some highlights from our sociology list here.

EAult_webGreetings, sociologists! I’m really sad not to get the chance to meet up with folks in person in San Francisco. Not only because, well, San Francisco!!, but also because this was supposed to be my first ASA as the editor primarily responsible for our sociology lists here at Duke. It’s an honor to be stepping into a strong list in a field that has lots of important insights to offer about the current uprisings against white supremacy and anti-Black policing, the healthcare disparities being laid bare by COVID-19, and so much more. I’m disappointed to miss out on the chance to celebrate the publication of important books like We Are Not Dreamers, a collection of work by undocumented scholars, edited by Leisy J. Abrego and Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales; Symbolic Violence, a new engagement with Bourdieu from Michael Burawoy; and Nandita Sharma’s crucial work on sovereignty and migration, Home Rule

Even without meeting in person, though, there’s lots to look forward to: I’m eager to see how Duke Press’s recent books on intersectionality, by Patricia Hill Collins and Jennifer Nash, are changing conversations and methods! And I’m really excited about the highlighted conversation on  “Power, Resistance, and Inequality in Tech,” which I know will draw on important insights from Ruha Benjamin’s edited collection Captivating Technology. I am looking forward to learning from you all as we continue the conversations represented by these books and begin new ones. 

A little bit about me: I’ve been acquiring books primarily in disability studies, Black studies, trans studies, global urban studies, and African and Middle East studies. I’m also interested in Latinx and other critical ethnic studies, critical studies of policing and prisons, and higher education. I know there’s lots of great work on these topics happening in sociology!

To give us the opportunity to meet face-to-face, I’ll be holding Zoom office hours, in lieu of the casual chats we might have had in the book room (or at the hotel bar!) on the Monday and Tuesday of the conference. You can sign up for those here. And you can always find me on Twitter.

If you were hoping to connect with Elizabeth or another of our editors about your book project at ASA, please reach out to them by email. See our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our new online submissions guidelines here.

In addition to the panel featuring Ruha Benjamin that Elizabeth mentions above, several of our authors are presenting at the virtual ASA conference. Michael Burawoy has organized the panel “The Neoliberal University,” is a discussant on the panel “Canonization,” and will serve as a moderator on the panel “The Specter of Global China.”  And Trevor Hoppe, co-editor of The War on Sex, has organized the panel “Deviance and Social Control.”

978-1-4780-0840-8This week we are also pleased to launch the first in a series of online conversations we are planning for the fall. Watch Alex Blanchette discuss his recent book Porkopolis with Senior Executive Editor Ken Wissoker. 

Flip to page 15 of our virtual sociology catalog to peruse imaginative new journal issues on disability, sanctuary, alternatives to policing, Indigenous land reclamation, and more.

And finally, we’re really going to miss one of our favorite conference traditions, the in-booth photos of authors with their recent books. Please check out our album of author selfies instead. We’ll be posting those photos on Twitter this weekend as well.

Although you can’t pick up books in our booth this year, you can save 30% online with coupon code ASOCA20. If you live in the UK or Europe, head to Combined Academic Publishers and save there with coupon code CSDUKE30.

Virtual Events in August

Please join our authors for these online events this August.

978-1-4780-0954-2Katina L. Rogers is participating in a three-part reading group about her book Putting the Humanities PhD to work. This discussion group will be structured as series of three videochats focusing on two to three chapters per week, beginning tomorrow, August 5, and continuing on August 12 and 19. Each week will be moderated by a guest host, and Rogers will participate in discussions and field questions. There’s no obligation to attend every session. If your pre-ordered copy of the book hasn’t arrived yet, you can send your receipt to Katina Rogers by email and she’ll get an electronic copy to you while you wait for the print. Preregister for the event to get the links.

A number of our authors are presenting at the virtual conference of the American Sociological Association. Catch Ruha Benjamin, editor of Captivating Technology; Michael Burawoy, author of Symbolic Violence; Trevor Hoppe, co-editor of The War on Sex; and Sara Ahmed, author of, most recently, What’s the Use? on various panels. The conference is free to ASA members and only $25 for non-members. Come back to the blog this Friday for a post on our recent sociology scholarship.

978-1-4780-0840-8Later this week we will be posting an online conversation between Senior Executive Editor Ken Wissoker and Alex Blanchette, author of Porkopolis. Check our YouTube page this Friday for the link. We’ll also be posting it to our Twitter and Facebook pages.

On August 7, David Palumbo-Liu, author of The Deliverance of Others; Lauren Berlant, editor, most recently, of Reading Sedgwick; and Mackenzie Wark, who has a book coming in 2021, are participating in a conversation entitled “Wildcats, Boycotts, and Academic Capital.” They will discuss the University of California Boycott movement supporting striking graduate students. RSVP to get the link.

On August 11, Ronak Kapadia, author of Insurgent Aesthetics, will give a virtual public seminar entitled “On the Skin: Drone Warfare, Collateral Damage, and the Human Terrain.”  

On August 18, Emily J. Lordi will discuss her new book The Meaning of Soul as part of the Popular Music Books in Progress series. Email Eric Weisbard (contact info on the series page) to get the Zoom link.

We hope you get a chance to check some of these out.

Virtual Events in July

978-1-4780-0813-2We’re so sad that our authors still aren’t able to do live events at bookstores and on campuses, but are glad that some of them are choosing to do virtual events to showcase their books instead. Here are a few online events you can attend this month.

The Popular Music Books in Process Series is a collaboration between the Journal of Popular Music Studies, IASPM-US, and the Pop Conference, meant to offer writers and scholars with books that have recently been published, or books in progress, on all kinds of popular music a chance to connect with a deeply interested community of readers. Several of our authors are participating in the series. On July 14, catch Xavier Livermon, author of Kwaito Bodies. On July 28, David Grubbs will discuss his new book The Voice in the Headphones. Looking ahead to fall, be sure to tune in for talks with Emily Lordi, author of The Meaning of Soul, and Maureen Mahon, author of Black Diamond Queens.

978-1-4780-0824-8_prOn July 8, Imani Perry, author of Vexy Thing, will interview Ashon Crawley, author of The Lonely Letters. They plan to talk about loneliness, blackness, blackqueerness, joy, love, and friendship.

On July 16, the Albuquerque Museum will host an online launch for Margaret Randall’s memoir, I Never Left Home. Randall will read from the book and the museum will have copies available for sale on their website.

July 20, join Louise Amoore and Nick Seaver as they discuss Amoore’s new book Cloud Ethics in an event sponsored by the University of Warwick.

Also on July 20, Intellectual Publics hosts Ashon Crawley, author of The Lonely Letters; Shana Redmond, author of Everything Man; and Nicole Fleetwood, in conversation with Jasmine Johnson.

On July 28, several of our authors gather online for a conversation entitled Black Diaspora Cultural Studies Now. Tune in to hear Samantha Pinto, author of Infamous Bodies; Naminata Diabate, author of Naked Agency; and Xavier Livermon, author of Kwaito Bodies, along with Yomaira C. Figueroa-Vásquez, Rebecca Wanzo and moderator Jennifer Nash, author of Black Feminism Reimagined.

Follow us on Twitter to learn about events as they are added to the calendar.

Watch our Virtual Poetry Reading

On Sunday, March 3, our book designer Aimee Harrison hosted an online poetry reading via Zoom. Poets David Grubbs, author of The Voice in the Headphones; Margaret Randall, author of the memoir I Never Left Home and editor of the poetry collection On the Road/ Solo el camino; and Renato Rosaldo, author of The Chasers. Alexis Pauline Gumbs, author, most recently, of Dub: Finding Ceremony, pre-taped a contribution.

We invite you to watch a recording of this great event!

If you enjoy the poems, don’t forget that the authors’ books are all 50% off during our Spring Sale with coupon SPRING50!

New Titles in American History

We regret to announce that in the ongoing efforts to mitigate the spread of the COVID-19 virus, we will be unable to meet with you during the Organization of American Historians conference, which has been cancelled.

We know that many of you look forward to stocking up on new books at special discounts at our conferences, so we are pleased to extend a 50% discount on all in-stock books and journal issues through May 1. Use coupon code SPRING50 to save 50% when ordering online. In addition, if you spend $100 or more, we are offering free shipping to U.S. addresses. Journal subscriptions and society memberships don’t qualify for the 50% discount, but they do count toward the $100 threshold.

We have added links to additional content for the titles we were planning to feature in our booth at OAH below, and we hope you will visit our website for more details.

Congratulations to Elspeth H. Brown, whose book Work!: A Queer History of Modeling is a finalist for the Mary Nickliss Prize in U.S. Women’s and/or Gender History, presented by the Organization of American Historians. Work! traces modeling’s history from the advent of photographic modeling in the early twentieth century to the rise of the supermodel in the 1980s. View a slideshow of some of the great images form the book in The Advocate.

Weaving U.S. history into the larger fabric of world history, the contributors to Crossing Empires: Taking U. S. History into Transimperial Terrain de-exceptionalize the American empire, placing it in a global transimperial context as a way to grasp the power relations that shape imperial formations. This volume is edited by Kristin L. Hoganson and Jay Sexton.

In Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai`i and Oceania, Maile Arvin analyzes the history of racialization of Polynesians within the context of settler colonialism across Polynesia, especially in Hawai‘i, arguing that a logic of possession through whiteness animates European and Hawaiian settler colonialism.

In Orozco’s American Epic: Myth, History, and the Melancholy of Race, Mary K. Coffey examines José Clemente Orozco’s mural cycle Epic of American Civilization, which indicts history as complicit in colonial violence and questions the claims of Manifest Destiny in the United States and the Mexican desire to mend the wounds of conquest in pursuit of a postcolonial national project.

Engaging contemporary photography by Sally Mann, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and others, Shawn Michelle Smith’s Photographic Returns: Racial Justice and the Time of Photography traces how historical moments come to be known photographically and the ways in which the past continues to inhabit, punctuate, and transform the present through the photographic medium.

The contributors to Remaking New Orleans: Beyond Exceptionalism and Authenticity challenge the uncritical acceptance of New Orleans-as-exceptional narratives, showing how they flatten the diversity, experience, and culture of the city’s residents and obscure other possible understandings. This collection is edited by Thomas Jessen Adams and Matt Sakakeeny.

If you were hoping to connect with one of our editors about your book project at OAH, please reach out to them by email. See our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our submissions guidelines here. We are now accepting submissions online!

Editorial Director Gisela Fosado says, “Even though I won’t be available for in-person meetings due to the cancellation, I hope new authors will feel free to send in their proposals through our online submission system.  I hope to see everyone at next year’s conference”

We also encourage you to check out some of our great new journal issues, including “Radical Histories of Sanctuary” from Radical History Review and “Legacies of ’68” from Cultural Politics. And the latest issue of Labor contains great articles on labor and public history. 

Once again, we’re sorry to miss you in person but hope the 50% discount with free U.S. shipping on orders over $100 will make it possible for you to pick up some new books and journal issues. Use coupon SPRING50 at checkout and see the fine print on the sale here.