Exhibits

Courtney Berger on the Canceled SCMS Conference

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Our editors look forward to meeting their authors at conferences every year and are sad to be missing out on that this spring. The annual meeting of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies would have taken place April 1-5 in Denver this year. We know that many of you look forward to stocking up on new books at special discounts at our conferences, so we are pleased to extend a 50% discount on all in-stock books and journal issues through May 1. In addition, if you spend $100 or more, we are offering free shipping to U.S. addresses. Journal subscriptions and society memberships don’t qualify for the 50% discount, but they do count toward the $100 threshold.

CBerger_webInstead of greeting Executive Editor Courtney Berger in person this year, check out her recommendations for new titles in the discipline and a great round up of other ways to learn about all the new scholarship that was to be presented at the conference.

Hello, SCMSers. I’m sorry that I won’t see you all in person this year. In the past couple of months, we have published an amazing range of new books in film & media studies. I was looking forward to showing them off at the conference.  I hope you’ll go to our website to see the new and forthcoming titles and take advantage of the 50% off sale. (I know, I know. It’s not the same as being able to browse books at the exhibit hall, but it’s the best we’ve got right now.) You can learn Her Storiesabout the centrality of the soap opera to the history of American tv production in Elana Levine’s Her Stories, experience the film culture of mid-20th century Paris with Eric Smoodin in Paris in the Dark, or find out about the environmental publics that emerge in India around radiant technologies like cell-phone towers in Rahul Mukherjee’s Radiant Infrastructures.

There were some exciting panels this year that I was hoping to attend that highlight some emerging areas on Duke’s media studies list. Several panels on environment and media feature work related to the new Elements series, edited by Nicole Starosielski and Stacy Alaimo. Some of these panels will be happening in virtual form during the week, so check them out if Wild Blue Mediayou can. Melody Jue’s Wild Blue Media is the latest book in the series. Jue submerges key concepts of media—such as storage and transmission—under water, asking us to reconsider conventional notions of media environment. It’s a must read for folks in media studies, in my opinion.

Also, here’s a heads up about an upcoming book series on gaming and game culture called “Power Play” that will be edited by Jen Malkowski and TreaAndrea Russworm. It’s brand new, so no books yet; but keep your eyes open for new books in this area. And if you are into queer gaming culture, check out Bonnie Ruberg’s volume The Queer Games Avant-Garde, which features interviews with 22 queer video game developers and designers.

Finally, I want to give a shout out to Eliza Steinbock, whose book Shimmering Images won this year’s SCMS Best First Book Award. Congratulations, Eliza!

Take care, everyone, and I look forward to seeing you next year.

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If you were hoping to connect with Courtney or another of our editors about your book project at SCMS, please reach out to them by email. See our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our new online submissions guidelines here.

We’re also excited to welcome liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies to our publishing program next spring. And don’t forget to check out our great new journal issues in film and media studies, including “On Chantal Akerman” from Camera Obscura, “Contemporary German and Austrian Cinema” from New German Critique, “Scenes of Suffering” from Theater, and “Multimodal Media” from Poetics Today.

Once again, we’re sorry to miss you in person but hope the 50% discount with free U.S. shipping on orders over $100 will make it possible for you to pick up some new books and journal issues. Use coupon SPRING50 at checkout and see the fine print on the sale here.

New Titles in Asian Studies

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Every year we look forward to connecting with scholars at the Association for Asian Studies conference. We will miss meeting with authors and editors and selling books at this year’s conference, which has been cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

We know that many of you look forward to stocking up on new books at special discounts at our conferences, so we are pleased to extend a 50% discount on all in-stock books and journal issues through May 1. In addition, if you spend $100 or more, we are offering free shipping to U.S. addresses. Journal subscriptions and society memberships don’t qualify for the 50% discount, but they do count toward the $100 threshold.

Here are some of the great titles in Asian Studies that we were planning to feature in our booth at AAS.

Experimental BeijingCongratulations to Sasha Su-Ling Welland, whose book Experimental Beijing: Gender and Globalization in Chinese Contemporary Art is the winner of the AAS’s 2020 Joseph Levenson Post-1900 Book Prize.

We also congratulate Juno Salazar Parreñas, whose book Decolonizing Extinction: The Work of Care in Orangutan Rehabilitation received honorable mention for the Harry J. Benda Prize, presented by the Southeast Asia Council (SEAC) of the AAS.

Margaret Hillenbrand’s Negative Exposures: Knowing What Not to Know in Contemporary China is new this month. She explores how artistic appropriations of historical images effectively articulate the openly unsayable and counter the public secrecy that erases traumatic episodes from China’s past.

Harry Harootunian is best known as a scholar of Japanese history, but recently he turned his pen to memoir, writing about his parents’ escape from the Armenian genocide in the early 20th century in The Unspoken as Heritage: The Armenian Genocide and Its Unaccounted Lives.

UnderglobalizationIn Underglobalization: Beijing’s Media Urbanism and the Chimera of Legitimacy, Joshua Neves examines the cultural politics of the “fake” and how frictions between legality and legitimacy propel dominant models of economic development and political life in contemporary China. See his recent blog post on the coronavirus.

In Invisibility by Design Women and Labor in Japan’s Digital Economy, Gabriella Lukács traces how young Japanese women’s unpaid labor as bloggers, net idols, “girly” photographers, online traders, and cell phone novelists was central to the development of Japan’s digital economy in the 1990s and 2000s.

Avian Reservoirs: Virus Hunters and Birdwatchers in Chinese Sentinel Posts by Frédéric Keck is unfortunately very timely right now. Keck Avian Reservoirstraces how the anticipation of bird flu pandemics has changed relations between birds and humans in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan, showing that humans’ reliance on birds is key to mitigating future pandemics. Check out his posts on the coronavirus’s impact in Wuhan in The Conversation and Somatosphere.

In his experimental work Ethnography #9, Alan Klima examines moneylending, gambling, funeral casinos, and the consultations of spirits and mediums to predict winning lottery numbers to illustrate the relationship between contemporary Thai spiritual and financial practices and global capitalism’s abstraction of monetary value.

Please check out all the titles we were planning on featuring in our program ad for the meeting. And see a complete list of our Asian Studies titles here.

EAS_new_prWe’re always excited to share our great Asian studies journals: Archives of Asian ArtComparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastEast Asian Science, Technology and Society, the Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture, the Journal of Korean Studies, positions: asia critique, and Prism: Theory and Modern Chinese Literature. Special issues are included in our 50%-off sale, and subscriptions are always available.

We also offer an Asian Studies e-book collection, which moves beyond traditional area studies to include titles addressing individual Asian countries as well as regional and transnational issues. Ask your librarian to learn more.

If you were hoping to connect with one of our editors about your book project at AAS, please reach out to them by email. See our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our submissions guidelines here.

Once again, we’re sorry to miss you in person but hope the 50% discount with free U.S. shipping on orders over $100 will make it possible for you to pick up some new books and journal issues. Use coupon SPRING50 at checkout and see the fine print on the sale here.

2019 Modern Language Association Highlights and Awards

This year’s meeting of the Modern Language Association was absolutely packed with awards, receptions, and events—and, like always, we had a wonderful time meeting authors, editors, and attendees and selling our books and journals.

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Congratulations to Melanie Yergeau, whose book Authoring Autism won the MLA Prize for a First Book, and Fred Moten, whose book Black and Blur won the William Sanders Scarborough Prize!

Several of our journals and books also received awards from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) and from the GL/Q Caucus for the Modern Languages:

CELJ Awards

Archives of Asian Art, the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and American Literature each received a CELJ award this year—congratulations to these journals!

coverimageThis year’s Best Journal Design Award was given to Archives of Asian Art. Upon joining Duke University Press in 2017, the journal was redesigned by Sue Hall, our now-retired journals designer of 23 years. The 2018 Association of University Presses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show also recognized the journal’s redesign: “The new design stands out because of the luxurious and well-placed illustrations and because it combines an elegant, versatile page design with fine-grained typographic sophistication,” wrote eminent typographer Robert Bringhurst.

The CELJ also recognized two of our journal issues with the Best Special Issue Award: “Queer about Comics,” an issue of American Literature (volume 90, issue 2) edited by Darieck Scott and Ramzi Fawaz; and “The Bible and English Readers,” an issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (volume 47, issue 3) edited by Thomas Fulton.

GL/Q Caucus Celebration and Awards

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Marcia Ochoa and Jennifer DeVere Brody with the 25th-anniversary issue of GLQ

This year, the GL/Q Caucus celebrated the 25th anniversary of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies with a panel on the journal and a reception. The caucus also awarded prizes to several outstanding books and journal articles:

The Crompton-Noll Award was given to Mary Zaborskis for the article “Sexual Orphanings,” published in GLQ (volume 22, issue 4), and Margaret Galvan for the article “‘The Lesbian Norman Rockwell’: Alison Bechdel and Queer Grassroots Networks,” published in American Literature (volume 90, issue 2).

The Alan Bray Book Award was granted to Jasbir Puar, author of The Right to Maim, and Ariane Cruz, author of The Color of Kink (NYU Press). Kadji Amin, author of Disturbing Attachments, received honorable mention, as did Tourmaline, Eric A. Stanley, and Johanna Burton, editors of Trap Door (New Museum and MIT Press).

Eric A. Stanley and Andrew Spieldenner received the Michael Lynch Award for Service, which, in Eve Sedgwick’s words, serves “to publicize and celebrate—and as widely as possible—the range, the forms, the energy, and the history of queer activism by academics.”

Other Highlights

We enjoyed celebrating several new journals with a wine reception Friday afternoon: Critical TimesEnglish Language Notes, Journal of Korean StudiesMeridiansPrism, and Qui Parle.

It was also wonderful to see several of our authors who stopped by the booth:

Thank you to all who came by to see us! For those of you who weren’t able to make it out to MLA, or who didn’t have enough room in your suitcase to pack all the books you wanted, don’t worry—you can still take advantage of the conference discount by using coupon code MLA19 at dukeupress.edu through the end of February.

American Academy of Religion, 2018

Before the Thanksgiving holiday, we enjoyed catching up with authors and editors and selling books and journals at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Denver.

Spiritual CitizenshipWe were thrilled to feature two recent award-winning titles in the booth: Spiritual Citizenship by N. Fadeke Castor, which won the 2018 Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion; and Everyday Conversions by Attiya Ahmad, which won the 2018 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS) Book Award.

Last year’s winner of the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography, Lauren Pond, displayed some of her photographs during the conference, and gave an artist’s talk about her book, Test of Faith.

Monique Moultrie, author of Passionate and Pious, and Laura Grillo, author of An Intimate Rebuke, both stopped by the booth to say hello.

If you weren’t able to attend the conference, or if your luggage was too heavy for more great books, you can still save 30% on all our great religion titles on our website using coupon code AAR18, through the end of the year.

American Anthropological Association, 2018

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Excited booth staffers after setting up!

It was wonderful to meet excited customers, sell books and journals, and celebrate our award-winning authors and editors at this year’s American Anthropological Association meeting in San José! Thanks to everyone who came by our booth to browse our stock or say hello.

Our anthropology titles were honored with more awards this year than every before! We are so excited to congratulate the following authors:

Check out our photo gallery of authors and editors:

 

Missed the conference? Not able to fit all the books you wanted into your luggage? You can still save on anthropology paperbacks through the end of the year—just use coupon code AAA18 at dukeupress.edu.

American Studies Association 2018

We enjoyed selling books and journals and meeting authors and editors at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Studies Association.

STX_134_prWe attended a launch party on Saturday for H̶e̶r̶e̶ and N̶o̶w̶: Under Erasure,” a special issue of Social Text (134). In both traditional and experimental prose, this special issue revisits the connection between depicting the world and making claims upon the human as self-narrating subject. At once advancing a critique of the present and recounting a process of writing out from under the emergency of the present, the essays propose to place the here and now under erasure. 

lisa-lowe-prize.jpgCongratulations to Lisa Lowe, author of The Intimacy of Four Continents, on winning the 2018 Carl Bode-Norman Holmes Pearson Prize. The award honors a scholar who has dedicated a lifetime of work to the mission and values of American studies. Lowe, a former president of the ASA, also won the Minority Scholars’ Committee Richard A. Yarborough Mentoring Award.

 

 

If you missed this year’s meeting, or if you didn’t have room in your luggage for all the books and journals you wanted to buy, you can still save 30% on our website with coupon code ASA2018, through the end of the year. Hope to see you next year!

National Women’s Studies Association, 2018

We enjoyed meeting authors and editors, selling books and journals, and celebrating prize-winning works at the 2018 National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference in Atlanta, Georgia!

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DUP Digital Access and Journals Specialist Amber Cary

Congratulations to several of our authors who received awards at the conference:

Jasbir Puar’s book, The Right to Maim, was co-winner of the Alison Piepmeier Book Prize.

Attiya Ahmad’s book, Everyday Conversions, won the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies Book (AMEWS) Award.

Miglena S. Todorova’s article, “Race and Women of Color in Socialist/Postsocialist Transnational Feminisms in Central and Southeastern Europe,” won the Paula J. Giddings Best Essay Award. It was featured in a past issue of our new journal Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism, an interdisciplinary feminist journal that publishes creative work by and about women of color in U.S. and international contexts, and is now available free for six months.

 

Together with editor Ginetta E. B. Candelario and managing editor Leslie Marie Aguilar, we celebrated our new publishing partnership with Meridians with a reception at our booth on Saturday.

There were also three “Author Meets the Critics” sessions featuring DUP authors Sami Schalk, Robyn Spencer, and Macarena Gómez-Barris.

It was a pleasure visiting with authors and editors at this wonderful conference!

Lynn Comella and Adan Martinez

Lynn Comella, author of Vibrator Nation, with her former student Adan Martinez.

 

Missed NWSA this year? Couldn’t fit all the books and journals you wanted into your suitcase? Don’t worry! You can still take advantage of the conference discount. Just use coupon code NWSA18 for 30% off your dukeupress.edu order at checkout.

LASA2018: Find Our Titles in Barcelona

The XXXVI International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association meets later this week in Barcelona. We’re pleased to announce that our books and journals will be available for purchase in the book exhibit at the Combined Academic Publishers booth, #I02. Editor Gisela Fosado will also be attending the conference.

Sins against NatureWe have some terrific new titles in Latin American studies that you can pick up at the conference. Historians will want to check out The FBI in Latin America: The Ecuador Files by Marc Becker. There will be a panel on his book on Saturday, May 26. A City on a Lake by Matthew Vitz tracks the environmental and political history of Mexico City and explains its transformation from a forested, water-rich environment into a smog-infested megacity. Another great history title to pick up is Sins against Nature by Zeb Tortorici, which explores the prosecution of sex acts in colonial New Spain.

If theory is your style, pick up a copy of The Extractive Zone Designs for the Pluriverseby Macarena Gómez-Barris, which traces the political, aesthetic, and performative practices that emerge in opposition to the ruinous effects of extractive capital. Gómez-Barris will be on a panel at LASA called “Extractive Wars” on Friday, May 25.  You should also take a look at Designs for the Pluriverse by Arturo Escobar, which presents a new vision of design theory and practice aimed at channeling design’s world-making capacity toward ways of being and doing that are deeply attuned to justice and the Earth. Escobar appears on a panel about the possibility of cooperation between Latin America and Europe on Wednesday, May 23.

Reclaiming the DiscardedIf your interests lie in anthropology, be sure to check out Reclaiming the Discarded by Kathleen M. Millar, an evocative ethnography of Jardim Gramacho, a sprawling garbage dump on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro.

If you’re not able to attend the conference, or if you prefer to order your books rather than carry them in your luggage, we are offering a 30% conference discount. For delivery in North or South America, order from us at dukeupress.edu and use coupon code LASA18 when checking out. For delivery in the UK, Europe, Asia, Africa, or Australia, order from Combined Academic Publishers (CAP) at combinedacademic.co.uk and use coupon code CSF18LASA .

978-0-8223-7109-0The conference discount is good for thirty days, so you’ll be able to order a couple of great titles that we won’t have available in time for LASA as well. Check our website or CAP’s in June to order On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, Praxis by Walter Mignolo and Catherine E. Walsh. It launches their new series of the same name. And also coming in June is the next volume in our popular Latin America Readers series: The Bolivia Reader. Get it for upcoming travel or consider requesting an exam copy and teaching it in your classes next year.

If you’re headed to Barcelona, we wish you a fun and productive meeting. Do stop by the CAP booth and check out our titles. If you aren’t able to attend LASA, we hope you’ll still take advantage of our 30% discount.

Society for Cinema and Media Studies 2018 Conference

We had a great time in Toronto at the annual conference of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies last week, selling books and journals and meeting authors and editors.

Queer Cinema in the WorldCongratulations to Karl Schoonover and Rosalind Galt, whose book Queer Cinema in the World won the Katherine Singer Kovacs award for outstanding scholarship in cinema and media studies.

We enjoyed a wine and cheese party celebrating the relaunch of our Camera Obscura book series (which is associated with our journal of the same name. Archiveology by Catherine Russell and Sisters in the Life edited by Yvonne Welbon and Alexandra Juhasz are the most recent books in the series.

Pamela Wojcik served as president of SCMS this year. She stopped by our booth to pose with her 2010 book The Apartment Plot. Her new edited collection, The Apartment Complex, is out in October.

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It’s always great to welcome authors and editors to the booth. Here are Lynn Comella, Rielle Navitski, Catherine Russell, and Yvonne Welbon and Alexandra Juhasz.

If you missed the meeting, you don’t have to miss the sale! Shop all our great media studies titles now and save 30% using coupon code SCMS18.

American Anthropological Association 2017

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Booth staffers ready to go on the first day

The 2017 American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., was a great chance for us to meet authors and editors, sell books and journals to excited customers, and celebrate prize-winning books!

Our authors racked up quite a few awards at this year’s conference:

Metabolic Living by Harris Solomon and Tell Me Why My Children Died by Charles Briggs and Clara Mantini-Briggs were co-winners of the New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology.

Sareeta Amrute’s Encoding Race, Encoding Class won the Diana Forsythe Prize from the Committee for the Anthropology of Science, Technology & Computing. Plastic Bodies by Emilia Sanabria received honorable mention for this prize.

Emilia Sanabria’s Plastic Bodies also won the Michelle Rosaldo First Book Prize from the Association for Feminist Anthropology. Downwardly Global by Lalaie Ameeriar was a finalist for the same prize.

Aimee Meredith Cox’s Shapeshifters won the Delmos Jones & Jagna Sharff Memorial Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of North America.

The Look of a Woman by Eric Plemons won the Ruth Benedict Prize in the Single-Authored Monograph category from the Association for Queer Anthropology.

Yolanda Covington-Ward’s Gesture and Power won the Elliott P. Skinner Award from the Association for Africanist Anthropology.

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João Biehl toasts new edited collection Unfinished

Reel World by Anand Pandian won second place for the Victor Turner Prize from the Society for Humanistic Anthropology, and David McDermott Hughes’s Energy without Conscience received honorable mention for the same prize.

Everyday Conversions by Attiya Ahmad received honorable mention for the Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion.

Congratulations to these outstanding authors!

On Friday we enjoyed a wine reception for the new collection Unfinished: The Anthropology of Becoming with its editors João Biehl and Peter Locke.

It was exciting to see so many of our authors and editors in person. Check out the photo gallery:

 

Did you miss AAA this year? Not enough room in your luggage to carry all the books and journals you wanted? You can still take advantage of our 30% conference discount—just use coupon code AAA17 on our website through January 15.