Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Studies

Read to Respond Wrap-Up

R2R final logoSeveral months ago we launched our  “Read to Respond” series to highlight some of our most groundbreaking scholarship engaged with today’s pressing issues. Each topic, from student activism to racial justice, is highlighted with a reading list that encourages students and teachers alike to join the conversation surrounding these current events. 

Revisit your favorite “Read to Respond” topics so far and share these resources in and out of the classroom. These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017.

Read to Respond: Racial Justice

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on racial justice, diving deep into topics such as racial identity, the Ferguson trial, and black activism. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Racial Justice

 

 

 

 

Read to Respond: Migration Studies

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on immigration in commemoration with World Refugee Day, an international movement that supports families forced to flee and honors the strength, courage and perseverance of millions of refugees. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Migration Studies

These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

 

Read to Respond: Queer Studies

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on queer studies in celebration of Pride Month and yesterday’s Equality March for Unity & Pride. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Queer Studies

These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

Subject Collections in Gender Studies and Latin American Studies

As we close out another academic year, we want to remind you of useful resources for two of the strongest areas of our publishing program: gender studies and Latin American studies. In 2017, we launched new e-book subject collections in Gender Studies and Latin American Studies.

GENDER STUDIES

Our Gender Studies/Feminist Theory book list features authors well known for their work in gender studies, gay and lesbian studies, transgender studies, and queer and feminist theory. Many of our journals also address gender studies from transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives:

View the title list for the Gender Studies collection, which features more than 500 e-books and is available to libraries by purchase, lease, or lease-to-own.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

Our Latin American Studies authors are well known for their work in anthropology, art, cultural studies, Caribbean studies, Chicano and Latino studies, history, literature, film and media, and politics. Many of our journals also cover Latin America:

View the title list for the Latin American Studies collection, which features more than 500 e-books and is available to libraries by purchase, lease, or lease-to-own.

If you’re interested in gaining access to these resources, have your librarian contact our Library Relations team to get more information.

Read To Respond: Bathroom Politics

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on bathroom politics, and how we make bathrooms accessible to people of different gender, ability, or class. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Bathroom Politics

These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

Read to Respond: Trans Rights

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. This post focuses on trans rights in light of the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia, a day dedicated to drawing the attention of policymakers, opinion leaders, social movements, the public, and the media to the violence and discrimination experienced by LGBTQIA+ people internationally. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Trans Rights

These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

Read to Respond: Articles for Student Activists

R2R final logoOur “Read to Respond” series addresses the current climate of misinformation by highlighting articles and books that encourage thoughtful, educated debate on today’s most pressing issues. Read, reflect, and share these resources in and out of the classroom to keep these important conversations going.

Articles for Student Activists:

These articles are freely available until August 15, 2017. Follow along with the series over the next several months and share your thoughts with #ReadtoRespond.

TSQ 101 for International Transgender Day of Visibility

In honor of the ninth annual International Transgender Day of Visibility, a celebration of transgender people that raises awareness of discrimination faced by transgender people worldwide, we selected nine articles from issues of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly that provide essential insights into terms, conversations, and challenges within the field of trans* studies.

  1. “Introduction”
    Susan Stryker and Paisley Currah
    Volume 1, Number 1-2

    This introduction to the first issue of TSQ provides an outline of the history and scope of the field of transgender studies.

  2. “Introduction: Trans/Feminisms”
    Susan Stryker and Talia M. Bettcher
    Volume 3, Number 1-2

    This introduction to the issue “Trans/Feminisms” counters forms of feminist transphobia within the feminist community by highlighting inspiring work currently being undertaken around the world under the banner of transfeminism.

  3. “Microaggressions”
    Sonny Nordmarken
    Volume 1, Number 1-2
    Transgender studies keyword essay

    This essay explores the term “microaggressions,” or commonplace, interpersonally communicated “othering” messages related to a person’s perceived marginalized status.

  4. “Radical Inclusion: Recounting the Trans Inclusive History of Radical Feminism”
    Cristan Williams
    Volume 3, Number 1-2

    This article reviews the ways in which radical feminism has been and continues to be trans inclusive. Trans inclusive radical feminist opinion leaders, groups, and events are reviewed and contrasted against a popular media narrative that asserts that radical feminism takes issue with trans people. Reviewed are historical instances in which radical feminists braved violence to ensure their feminism was trans inclusive.

  5. “Decolonizing Transgender: A Roundtable Discussion”
    Tom Boellstorff, Mauro Cabral, Micha Cardenas, Trystan Cotten, Eric A. Stanley, Kalaniopua Young, Aren Z. Aizura
    Volume 1, Number 3

    Participants in this roundtable discussion wrestled with definitions of decolonization, how decolonization has affected them personally and politically, and how trans* studies can offer strategies to demarginalize the community.

  6. “Transgender”
    Cristan Williams
    Volume 1, Number 1-2
    Transgender studies keyword essay

    This essay explores the term “transgender” and how it gained widespread use as the umbrella term for describing a range of gender-variant identities and communities within the United States in the early 1990s.

  7. “Cisgender”
    B. Aultman
    Volume 1, Number 1-2
    Transgender studies keyword essay

    This essay explores the term “cisgender,” which describes individuals who possess, from birth and into adulthood, the male or female reproductive organs (sex) typical of the social category of man or woman (gender) to which that individual was assigned at birth. The essay tracks the term’s emergence from trans* activist discourses in the 1990s.

  8. “Cultural Competency”
    Willy Wilkinson
    Volume 1, Number 1-2
    Transgender studies keyword essay

    This essay explores the term “cultural competency,” or the ability to understand, communicate with, and effectively interact with diverse populations, measured by awareness, attitude, knowledge, skills, behaviors, policies, procedures, and organizational systems.

  9. “Transition”
    Julian Carter
    Volume 1, Number 1-2
    Transgender studies keyword essay

    This essay explores the term “transition,” the vernacular term of choice in North America for describing the process or experience of changing gender.

 

Celebrate International Transgender Visibility Day with us by downloading free coloring pages of a few of TSQ’s most memorable journal covers below. Share your colored-in sheet on Instagram or Twitter for a chance to win a TSQ gift bag! Tag @DukePress on Twitter or @dukeuniversitypress on Instagram with the hashtag #ColorMyTSQ!

TSQ Gift Bag

Enter for a chance to win issues of the journal, a signed TSQ book plate, and Duke University Press swag!

TSQ_3_3-4_Coloring-sheet-page-001TSQ_1_3_coloring-sheet-page-001

 

Archives in French History

ddfhs_40_2In the most recent issue of French Historical Studies, “Archives in French History,” editors Sarah A. Curtis and Stephen L. Harp examine the role of the archive in the study of French history. “Archives are a subject as well as an object of study, not simple depots for boxes containing unambiguous evidence of the past waiting to be discovered by historians,” they write in the introduction. “This issue reveals not only the breadth of archives now used to write French history but also the depth of thinking about the relationship between archives and history and between archives and historians.”

Contributors to this issue question the nature, origin, or history of the archive in French history to examine its dynamic relationship to the history that is written, rather than treating the archive as static or inert. The archives, therefore, are the historical subjects themselves. They answer questions like what constitutes an archive, what is the role of the state in the archival collection, what is no longer in the archive, who controls access to the archive, and what historians owe to their sources.

From the introduction:

Despite these new questions, our contention is that historians of France, like historians in many other fields today, use a wider array of archives, and we use them more broadly, more deeply, and more self-consciously than ever before. One special issue cannot fully capture that depth or that breadth, but the essays here offer a taste of the richness that characterizes current work on France while also providing thoughtful understandings of the structure and context of archives. We hope they encourage you to reflect—critically or not—on your own archive stories.

Topics in this issue include the ownership of history, sex in the archives, discovering an accidental archive, and the destruction and salvation of the archive. Browse the full table-of-contents.

Read the introduction to the issue, made freely available.