HAHR

Popular Protests in Venezuela

This spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history. This week, HAHR offers a thematic reading list curated by Scott Doebler. All articles are freely available online through the end of August.

Venezuela’s ongoing political drama, popular protests, sustained humanitarian crisis, and growing diaspora have captured the world’s attention. The starkness of the current crisis contrasts markedly with what was until recently a wealthy economy buoyed by colossal oil reserves.

The current political convulsions are far from singular in Venezuela’s history; HAHR has published numerous articles about popular protests throughout Latin America, including many in Venezuela’s history. Presented here are four such articles that explore different outpourings of popular protest in Latin America against the powers that be—some violent, some peaceful, and some a complicated mixture.

The authors investigate the individual conditions that provoked the contestations, often placing them within larger national and global contexts. The articles not only showcase varied local situations spaced over centuries, thus transcending the “colonial” and “modern” divide, but they also represent changing interpretations of popular protests themselves and their role in society.

Civil Disorders and Popular Protests in Late Colonial New Granada” by Anthony McFarlane (1984)
Written as the social history turn was in full swing, McFarlane investigates who participated in “civil disorders” and why by focusing on lesser-known (at the time) challenges to aspects of colonial rule.

Indian Rebellion and Bourbon Reform in New Granada: Riots in Pasto, 1780–1800” by Rebecca Earle (1993)
This study of two rebellions at the turn of the nineteenth century looks at the weakness of state control over distant populations and their continued expectation of autonomy.

Public Land Settlement, Privatization, and Peasant Protest in Duaca, Venezuela, 1870–1936” by Doug Yarrington (1994)
Focusing on understudied Duaca, Venezuela, Yarrington follows changing land ownership patterns and its consequences.

‘A Weapon as Powerful as the Vote’: Urban Protest and Electoral Politics in Venezuela, 1978–1983” by Alejandro Velasco (2010)
This article examines how popular sectors held democracy accountable for representing their interests by hijacking public property.

For additional background reading on Venezuela, check out some of our books on its history and politics. We Created Chávez by George Ciccariello-Maher tells the history of Venezuelan politics from below, explaining how militants, students, women, Afro-indigeneous peoples, and the working-class brought about Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution and, ultimately, brought Hugo Chávez to power. In Channeling the State, Naomi Schiller explores how community television in Venezuela created openings for the urban poor to embrace the state as a collective process with the potential for creating positive social change. Looking beyond Hugo Chávez and the national government, contributors to Venezuela’s Bolivarian Democracy, edited by David Smilde and Daniel Hellinger, examine forms of democracy involving ordinary Venezuelans: in communal councils, cultural activities, blogs, community media, and other forums. The Enduring Legacy by Miguel Tinker Salas is a history of the oil industry’s rise in Venezuela focused especially on the experiences and perceptions of industry employees, both American and Venezuelan.

We also have some titles on Venezuela’s culture. Marcia Ochoa’s Queen for a Day considers how femininities are produced, performed, and consumed on the runways of the Miss Venezuela contest and on the well-traveled Caracas avenue where transgender women (transformistas) project themselves into the urban imaginary. Sujatha Fernandes’s Who Can Stop the Drums is a vivid ethnography of social movements in the barrios, or poor shantytowns, of Caracas, Venezuela. And The Fernando Coronil Reader is a posthumous collection of the Venezuelan anthropologist’s most important work that highlights his deep concern with the global South, Latin American state formation, theories of nature, empire and postcolonialism, and anthrohistory as an intellectual and ethical approach.

Top image: A protester wearing an Anonymous mask and lifting a Venezuelan flag, March 16, 2014. Photo by Jamez42. Licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication. (Find the original here.)

LGBTQ+ and Latin American History

Día_de_la_Visibiliad_Lésbica_Santa_Fe-_Argentina_-_Tamara_Zentner-7This spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history.

We’re pleased to make “LGBTQ+ and Latin American History,” a curated collection of HAHR articles, freely available through the end of August:

Also check out “Trans Studies en las Américas,” a new issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (volume 6, issue 2), which offers a hemispheric perspective on trans and travesti studies. Read the introduction, freely available, or browse the contents.

Image: Día de la Visibilidad Lésbica Santa Fe, Argentina, 2018. Photo by Tamara Zentner. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

Top Ten Most Read Articles From HAHR

HAHR_picThis spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history.

HAHR publishes vital work across thematic, chronological, regional, and methodological specializations, with articles featuring original, innovative research and path-breaking analysis.

Interested in reading more? Here are the top ten most frequently read articles from HAHR from the past year, freely available through August:

Want to keep up to date on the latest cutting-edge articles from HAHR? Sign up for email alerts when new issues are published.

Learn more about the journal in “Celebrating 100 Years of the Hispanic American Historical Review,” produced last year in honor of HAHR’s centennial:

Spotlight on the Hispanic American Historical Review

This spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history.

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Founded in 1918, HAHR pioneered the study of Latin American history and culture in the United States. In fact, HAHR‘s first issue published a letter from then-president Woodrow Wilson expressing his interest in the journal:

My dear Professor Chapman:

I learn with a great deal of interest of the plans for an Ibero-American Historical Review and beg that you will express to all those interested my very sincere approval of the project. It is a most interesting one and ought to lead to very important results both for scholarship and for the increase of cordial feeling throughout the Americas.

Cordially and sincerely yours,

Woodrow Wilson

984Today, HAHR publishes rigorous scholarship on every facet of Latin American history and culture. It is edited by Martha Few, Zachary Morgan, Matthew Restall, and Amara Solari.

“My dream for this journal … is to just continue the excellence that has already been established by the previous editors going back decades now,” said Solari.

“It has become the flagship journal of the field, and I think that’s one of the reasons why the field of Latin American history is so much more dynamic than many others,” said former coeditor Jocelyn Olcott.

HAHR covers a wide range of topics, including environmental history, science and medicine, drug history, reproduction, race, immigration, and many more. The journal’s website offers two thematic collections of articles: LGBTQ+ and Latin American History and The Environment and Modernity in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Latin America.

“It has been central now for a hundred years in helping establish the field and really point to the absolute best scholarship within Latin American history,” said Gisela Fosado, editor at Duke University Press and member of the HAHR Board of Editors. “It’s always going to be pushing the field, defining the field, bringing out a really wide range of voices.”

Want to keep up to date on the latest cutting-edge articles from HAHR? Sign up for email alerts when new issues are published. You can also browse the journal’s current contents here.

Learn more about the journal in “Celebrating 100 Years of the Hispanic American Historical Review,” produced last year in honor of HAHR’s centennial: