History

Trans*historicities

The most recent issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, “Trans*historicities,” edited by Leah DeVun and Zeb Tortorici, is now available.

coverimageThis issue offers a theoretical and methodological imagining of what constitutes trans* before the advent of the terms that scholars generally look to for the formation of modern conceptions of gender, sex, and sexuality. What might we find if we look for trans* before trans*? While some historians have rejected the category of transgender to speak of experiences before the mid-twentieth century, others have laid claim to those living gender-non-conforming lives before our contemporary era. By using the concept of trans*historicity, this volume draws together trans* studies, historical inquiry, and queer temporality while also emphasizing the historical specificity and variability of gendered systems of embodiment in different time periods.

Essay topics include a queer analysis of medieval European saints, discussions of a nineteenth-century Russian religious sect, an exploration of a third gender in early modern Japanese art, a reclamation of Ojibwe and Plains Cree Two-Spirit language, and biopolitical genealogies and filmic representations of transsexuality. The issue also features a roundtable discussion on trans*historicities and an interview with the creators of the 2015 film Deseos. Critiquing both progressive teleologies and the idea of sex or gender as a timeless tradition, this issue articulates our own desires for trans history, trans*historicities, and queerly temporal forms of historical narration.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, made freely available.

Photography and Work

RHR_18_3_coverThe most recent issue of Radical History Review, “Photography and Work,” edited by Kevin Coleman, Daniel James, and Jayeeta Sharma, is now available.

What makes photographs different from other kinds of historical source material? What can photograph images do that other documents cannot? Can photographs help us to see how capitalism works? This special issue considers these questions as it examines the capacity of photography to capture labor and capital. Through the study of fine art photography, as well as state, corporate, family, trade union, ethnographic, photojournalistic, and environmental visual archives, the issue seeks to understand the ways that photography has been central to both the appropriation and exploitation of labor and to the artistic critique of these practices.

Browse the table-of-contents and read the introduction, made freely available.

Design Principles for Teaching History

Today we’re pleased to showcase the four books that currently comprise our Design Principles for Teaching History series, edited by Antoinette Burton. The most recent addition, A Primer for Teaching Women, Gender, and Sexuality in World History, is newly available this season.

Books in this series provide a guide for college and secondary school teachers who are teaching a particular field of history for the first time, for experienced teachers who want to reinvigorate their courses, for those who are training future teachers to prepare their own syllabi, and for teachers who want to incorporate specific topics into their history courses. These books are not intended to serve as a textbook nor advocate a particular school of thought. Rather, informed by the authors’ experiences in the classroom, they provide a guide to developing a syllabus around an integrated set of arguments and conceptual orientations. Ideal for teachers of all experience levels, the titles in this series help translate expert knowledge of a field into effective and thoughtful pedagogical strategies for a range of practitioners.

The series currently includes A Primer for Teaching World History, edited by Antoinette Burton; A Primer for Teaching African History, edited by Trevor Getz; A Primer for Teaching Environmental History, edited by Emily Wakild and Michelle K. Berry; and A Primer for Teaching Women, Gender, and Sexuality in World History, edited by Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks and Urmi Engineer Willoughby.

ckn_24_3_coverAlso of interest is a newly published issue of Common Knowledge: the second part of a two-part symposium titled “In the Humanities Classroom.” The first set of case studies described particular pedagogical experiences rather than simply making general arguments about the value of the humanities. In its recently published second set of case studiesCommon Knowledge continues this approach of describing in detail the excitement and discovery that can occur in a particular humanities class but also expands upon the first to include the voices of graduate students and an undergraduate and to delineate the process by which one teacher put together an online course. This special section argues that descriptions of specific classroom experiences and of the careful planning and passionate commitment of teachers may help to cling to the moral values both professors and their students seem to need and want in troubled times. Article topics include “Teaching Western Civilization,” “Teaching an Online Course,” and “When History Meets Politics.”

Historian Dawn Bohulano Mabalon Has Died

Dawn+photoWe were deeply saddened to learn of the death of historian Dawn Bohulano Mabalon on August 10. 2018. Mabalon was the author of Little Manila Is in the Heart: The Making of the Filipina/o American Community in Stockton, California, published in 2013.

Mabalon saw her work as an act of community building. In an interview with The Margins in 2013, she said: “Filipinos in Stockton are on a journey towards realizing our memories and stories are history. We have been taught that it’s the growers and business owners and elite in Stockton who make history, and we only have our memories and those don’t mean as much. But realizing how we are a part of the American story is so empowering and so important. And that’s what I wanted to do with this book.”

littlemanilaShe toured tirelessly to share her research with Filipino-American communities, often sharing homemade treats with her enthusiastic audiences.  She was a co-founder and board member of the Little Manila Foundation, and in 2013 she was named to the list of the Filipina Women’s Network 100 Most Influential Filipinas in the World.

The Stockton Record reports that the local Filipino community is deeply mourning Mabalon’s loss, casting a shadow over the annual Barrio Fiesta. Dawn Mabalon’s family has set up a memorial fund to help with her funeral costs.

 

Series Launch: Global and Insurgent Legalities

This month we’re excited to announce the new book series Global and Insurgent Legalities, edited by Jonathan Goldberg-Hiller and Eve Darian-Smith.

Global and Insurgent Legalities explores how law and legal cultures travel within and beyond national jurisdictions and how they become reconfigured in the process. Books in this series attend to the ways schools of thought indigenous to the global South refract and reframe the Continental social and legal theories that are typically associated with scholarship produced in the global North. The series promotes critical, interdisciplinary, and transnational sociolegal work on topics ranging from social, sexual, and colonial inequalities to the circulation of non-western concepts of property, sovereignty, and individualism. Recognizing the enduring impact of imperialism, colonialism, and oppression on legal and social relations, Global and Insurgent Legalities decenters the production of legal theory to include perspectives, voices, and concepts from around the world.

978-0-8223-7146-5The series’ first book is Colonial Lives of Property by Brenna Bhandar, which examines how modern property law contributes to the formation of racial subjects in settler colonies and to the development of racial capitalism. Examining both historical cases and ongoing processes of settler colonialism in Canada, Australia, and Israel and Palestine, Bhandar shows how the colonial appropriation of indigenous lands depends upon ideologies of European racial superiority as well as upon legal narratives that equate civilized life with English concepts of property.

978-0-8223-7035-2Renisa Mawani’s Across Oceans of Law joins Global and Insurgent Legalities this month. Mawani retells the well-known story of the Komagata Maru, a British-built, Japanese-owned steamship whose Punjabi migrant passengers were denied entry into Canada, and later deported to Calcutta, in 1914. Drawing on “oceans as method”—a mode of thinking and writing that repositions land and sea—Mawani examines the historical and conceptual stakes of situating histories of Indian migration within maritime worlds.

Both of these books are available now, and we look forward to watching the series grow!

On “Theses on Theory and History”

Capture2We’re pleased to share a post from the Wild On Collective, which comprises Ethan Kleinberg, Joan Wallach Scott, and Gary Wilder, about their new project “Theses on Theory and History.” Scott and Wilder are both Duke University Press authors; Scott is editor of Women’s Studies on the Edge and author of The Fantasy of Feminist History, and Wilder is author of Freedom Time and co-editor of The Struggle for Life is the Matter, forthcoming in 2019.

Linked here is a programmatic intervention entitled “Theses on Theory and History” co-written by the three academic historians who currently compose the Wild On Collective. This first publication, which is freely available for web viewing or as a downloadable PDF, emerged from a series of conversations among the three of us that began in fall 2018. Despite our different theoretical investments and analytic orientations, we were each struck by how deeply entrenched realist epistemology and empiricist methodology remains in the field of disciplinary history. This, notwithstanding repeated attempts by successive generations of critics to free historical thinking and knowledge from the fetishes of archival evidence, chronological narrative, and reified boundaries between past and present. We discussed the perverse mechanism whereby the epistemological challenges to conventional history that developed between the 1970s and 1990s were superficially embraced, only in order to be domesticated as new themes or topics to be explored in familiar ways. We concurred that circumscribed assumptions about what counts as historical evidence, argument, and truth are systemically produced by the disciplinary guild.

“Theses on Theory and History” is divided into three sections: one on the assumptions of disciplinary history, another on the strategies through which the field resists “theory” as somehow foreign to real history, and a third which calls programmatically for a theoretically informed practice of critical history. Our aim is to provoke a debate among and beyond professional historians about the intellectual implications of this unstated but regularly enforced disciplinary commonsense concerning descriptive realism and archival empiricism. Specifically, we hope to challenge any artificial separation of empirical research and theoretical reflection; to invite historians to be more conceptually self-aware and critically self-reflexive; to push the field to recognize non-realist and non-empiricist modes of analysis as legitimate ways to know the past; and to remind scholars in other fields that professional history does not possess a monopoly on modes of historical thinking or means of historical insight.

Because these domesticating and disciplining processes are systemic, our theses address all aspects of professional history—training, research, writing, publishing, hiring. Likewise, we believe that any attempt to redress such problems must do so holistically. This intervention is not in any way meant to be a comprehensive inventory of all that is wrong, even theoretically, with the field and the guild (e.g., the persistent Eurocentrism of its frameworks). Even less is it meant to be theoretically prescriptive; we make no claims about which theories historians should engage, how they might be employed, how they might go about theorizing their own work, or to what end. But we do believe that any attempt to change a specific aspect of the field that brackets questions about what counts as evidence and how we produce knowledge is likely to be limited at best. We hope that this initial intervention is only a first step in opening a broader debate about these issues within the field of history. We also hope to create a community of like-minded scholars, within and beyond the field of history, to share concerns about and strategies for doing history otherwise.

Now Available: First Issue of Journal of Korean Studies Published by Duke University Press

ddjks_23_1We are pleased to announce that the first issue of the Journal of Korean Studies fully published by Duke University Press, volume 23, issue 1, is now available.

The Journal of Korean Studies is the preeminent journal in its field, publishing high-quality articles in all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences on a broad range of Korea-related topics, both historical and contemporary. Korean studies is a dynamic field, with student enrollments and tenure-track positions growing throughout North America and abroad. At the same time, the Korean peninsula’s increasing importance in the world has sparked interest in Korea well beyond those whose academic work focuses on the region. Recent topics include the history of anthropology of Korea; seventeenth century Korean love stories; the Chinese diaspora in North Korea; student activism in colonial Korea in the 1940s; and GLBTQ life in contemporary South Korea. Contributors include scholars conducting transnational work on the Asia-Pacific as well as on relevant topics throughout the global Korean diaspora. The Journal of Korean Studies is based at the Center for Korean Research at Columbia University.

Browse the table of contents to the issue.

Hispanic American Historical Review Commemorates 100th Anniversary

ddhahr_98_2_coverHispanic American Historical Review (HAHR) observes its 100th anniversary in 2018 and has marked the occasion with a celebratory video highlighting the history and the future of the journal.

HAHR pioneered the study of Latin American history and culture in the United States and remains a widely respected journal in the field. Today, the journal publishes rigorous scholarship on every facet of Latin American history and culture across thematic, chronological, regional, and methodological specializations.

“It has become the flagship journal of the field, and I think that’s one of the reasons why the field of Latin American history is so much more dynamic than many others,” former HAHR coeditor Jocelyn Olcott states.

Founded in 1918 by University of California professor Charles E. Chapman and University of Illinois professor William S. Robertson, the journal’s first issue featured a letter from sitting President Woodrow Wilson. “I learn with a great deal of interest of the plans for an Ibero-American Historical Review and beg that you will express to all those interested my very sincere approval of the project,” Wilson wrote. “It is a most interesting one and ought to lead to very important results both for scholarship and for the increase of cordial feelings throughout the Americas.”

ddhahr_96_4Hispanic American Historical Review is the oldest journal that focuses on Latin America as a whole in the history field. It was one of the earliest journals dealing with any type of history other than United States history. It really is a pioneer. It has been the major point of reference for people in the field,” said former HAHR coeditor John D. French.

The journal fell into financial crisis in 1922 and ceased publication for four years, when Duke University Press offered a subsidy to support the journal. With publishing and institutional support, the journal has continued publication with Duke University Press since 1926.

HAHR has published over 400 issues and periodically publishes special features, such as forums and special issues. Topics include environmental history, science and medicine, drug history, reproduction, and slavery and race. Online content can be found at read.dukeupress.edu/hahr. The journal also features online resources at hahr-online.com and @HAHR21 on Twitter and @HispanicAmericanHistoricalReview on Facebook.

Since 2017, the HAHR editorial office is based at Pennsylvania State University under the direction of editors Martha Few, Zachary Morgan, Matthew Restall, and Amara Solari, and managing editor Sean Mannion.

“Though we have a long history, this is not a traditional or staid journal and we hope that we’ll have exciting, progressive, and participatory research coming out of the five years that it’s in our hands,” said current coeditor Zachary Morgan.

Commemorate the 100th anniversary of the journal with the video, “Celebrating 100 Years of the Hispanic American Historical Review.”

Earth Day Reads

Happy Earth Day! We’re pleased to share our latest scholarship in environmental studies—we hope it helps to educate and inspire action around some of the most pressing problems facing our planet today. Learn more about this year’s Earth Day campaign: ending plastic pollution.

978-0-8223-6902-8In Fractivism, Sara Ann Wylie traces the history of fracking and the ways scientists and everyday people are coming together to hold accountable an industry that has managed to evade regulation. A call to action, Fractivism outlines a way forward for not just the fifteen million Americans who live within a mile of an unconventional oil or gas well, but for the planet as a whole.

ddenv_9_2_cover

Environmental Humanities is a peer-reviewed, international, open-access journal. The journal publishes outstanding interdisciplinary scholarship that draws humanities disciplines into conversation with each other, and with the natural and social sciences, around significant environmental issues. Environmental Humanities has a specific focus on publishing the best interdisciplinary scholarship; as such, the journal has a particular mandate to publish interdisciplinary papers that do not fit comfortably within the established environmental subdisciplines and to publish high-quality submissions from within any of these fields that are accessible and seeking to reach a broader readership. Read the journal here.

In A Primer for Teaching Environmental History, Emily Wakild and Michelle K. Berry offer design principles for creating syllabi that will help students navigate a wide range of topics, from food, environmental justice, and natural resources to animal-human relations, senses of place, and climate change.

ddsaq_116_2_coverAutonomia in the Anthropocene,” a special issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, explores challenges posed to radical politics by an era of anthropogenic global change. Informed by new sites of struggle around extraction, waste, rising seas and toxic landscapes, and by new indigenous and worker movements, the issue rethinks key concepts in the autonomist lexicon — species being, the common, multitude, potentia, the production of subjectivity — in an effort to generate powerful analytical and political resources for confronting the social and ecological relations of informationalized capitalism.

978-0-8223-7040-6Matthew Vitz’s new book A City on a Lake tracks the environmental and political history of Mexico City and explains its transformation from a forested, water-rich environment into a smog-infested megacity plagued by environmental problems and social inequality.

In Landscapes of Power, Dana E. Powell examines the rise and fall of the controversial Desert Rock Power Plant initiative in New Mexico to trace the political conflicts surrounding native sovereignty and contemporary energy development on Navajo (Diné) Nation land. Powell’s historical and ethnographic account shows how the coal-fired power plant project’s defeat provided the basis for redefining the legacies of colonialism, mineral extraction, and environmentalism.

978-0-8223-6374-3Mikael D. Wolfe’s Watering the Revolution transforms our understanding of Mexican agrarian reform through an environmental and technological history of water management in the emblematic Laguna region. By uncovering the varied motivations behind the Mexican government’s decision to use invasive and damaging technologies despite knowing they were ecologically unsustainable, Wolfe tells a cautionary tale of the long-term consequences of short-sighted development policies.

saq_116_1Though the causes and effects of climate change pervade our everyday lives—the air we breathe, the food we eat, the objects we use—the way the discourse of climate change influences how we make meaning of ourselves and our world is still unexplored. Contributors to “Climate Change and the Production of Knowledge,” a special issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, bring diverse perspectives to the ways that climate change science and discourse have reshaped the contemporary architecture of knowledge itself: reconstituting intellectual disciplines and artistic practices, redrawing and dissolving boundaries, and reframing how knowledge is represented and disseminated. The contributors address the emergence of global warming discourse in fields like history, journalism, anthropology, and the visual arts; the collaborative study of climate change between the human and material sciences; and the impact of climate change on forms of representation and dissemination in this new interdisciplinary landscape.

In Energy without Conscience David McDermott Hughes investigates why climate change has yet to be seen as a moral issue, examining the forces that render the use of fossil fuels ordinary and therefore exempt from ethical evaluation. He passionately argues that like slavery, producing oil is a moral choice and that oil is at its most dangerous when it is accepted as an ordinary part of everyday life.

ddpcult_28_2We live in the age of extremes, a period punctuated by significant disasters that have changed the way we understand risk, vulnerability, and the future of communities. Violent ecological events such as Superstorm Sandy attest to the urgent need to analyze what cities around the world are doing to reduce carbon emissions, develop new energy systems, and build structures to enhance preparedness for catastrophe. The essays in “Climate Change and the Future of Cities: Mitigation, Adaptation, and Social Change on an Urban Planet,” a special issue of Public Culture, illustrate that the best techniques for safeguarding cities and critical infrastructure systems from threats related to climate change have multiple benefits, strengthening networks that promote health and prosperity during ordinary times as well as mitigating damage during disasters. The contributors provide a truly global perspective on topics such as the toxic effects of fracking, water rights in the Los Angeles region, wind energy in southern Mexico, and water scarcity from Brazil to the Arabian Peninsula.

Nationalism and Free Speech

The most recent issue of World Policy Journal, “Nationalism and Free Speech,” edited by Jessica Loudis, is now available.

m_ddwpj_35_1_coverIt’s rare right now to hear the terms “nationalism” and “free speech” outside the context of partisan politics, but these terms can provide entry points into how a country understands itself, and which legacies its citizens value—or conspicuously don’t. In this issue, contributors explore the mythologies that bind a nation and consider how societies around the world define themselves in terms of what citizens are—and aren’t—allowed to say and represent.

Topics include the novelist Yukio Mishima and the history of homosexuality in Japan, which has traditionally been accepted in practice, though not in law; the role of psychoanalysis in Argentina during and after its authoritarian regime; how Jamaica’s roots-reggae revival is a return to a tradition of musicians providing social commentary; and Britain’s New Age Traveler movement, a freewheeling 70s-era subculture whose impromptu festivals shaped the development of UK public-space laws.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, made freely available.