Journals

Women’s Equality Day Reads

Saturday is Women’s Equality Day, and we couldn’t be more glad for an occasion both to commemorate strides in women’s rights and to renew the call for further progress. Today we’re contributing to the cause by sharing some of our most recent scholarship in women’s studies.

In the 1970s a group of pioneering feminist entrepreneurs launched a movement that ultimately changed the way sex was talked about, had, and enjoyed. Boldly reimagining who sex shops were for and the kinds of spaces they could be, these entrepreneurs opened sex-toy stores like Eve’s Garden, Good Vibrations, and Babeland not just as commercial enterprises, but to provide educational and community resources as well. In Vibrator Nation Lynn Comella tells the fascinating history of how these stores raised sexual consciousness, redefined the adult industry, and changed women’s lives.

While news of the Rwandan genocide reached all corners of the globe, the nation’s recovery and the key role of women are less well known. In Rwandan Women Rising Swanee Hunt shares the stories of some seventy women—heralded activists and unsung heroes alike—who overcame unfathomable brutality, unrecoverable loss, and unending challenges to rebuild Rwandan society.

Developed in the United States in the 1980s, facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of trans- women. In The Look of a Woman Eric Plemons foregrounds the narratives of FFS patients and their surgeons as they move from consultation and the operating room to postsurgery recovery. Plemons demonstrates how FFS is changing the project of surgical sex reassignment by reconfiguring the kind of sex that surgery aims to change.

In Politics with Beauvoir Lori Jo Marso treats Simone de Beauvoir’s feminist theory and practice as part of her political theory, arguing that freedom is Beauvoir’s central concern and that this is best apprehended through Marso’s notion of the encounter. Beauvoir’s encounters, Marso shows, exemplify freedom as a shared, relational, collective practice.

In The Labor of Faith Judith Casselberry examines the material and spiritual labor of the women of one of the oldest and largest historically Black Pentecostal churches in the United States. This male-headed church only functions through the work of the church’s women, who, despite making up three-quarters of its adult membership, hold no formal positions of power. Focusing on the circumstances of producing a holy black female personhood, Casselberry reveals the ways twenty-first-century women’s spiritual power operates and resonates with meaning in Pentecostal, female-majority, male-led churches.

wpj33_4_23_frontcover_fppIn “Interrupted,” a special issue of World Policy Journal penned entirely by female foreign policy experts and journalists, contributors imagine a world where the majority of foreign policy experts quoted, bylined, and miked are not men. The issue challenges the perception that women are not policymakers by showcasing the voices of female experts and leaders. Contributors to this issue address topics such as feminism in Chinaabortion laws across the Americascombating violent extremism by working with religious leaders, and women in media. The issue also features a conversation with Dr. Ameenah Gurib-Fakim, President of Mauritus.

In The Economization of Life Michelle Murphy provocatively describes the twentieth-century rise of infrastructures of calculation and experiment aimed at governing population for the sake of national economy. Murphy traces the methods and imaginaries through which family planning calculated lives not worth living, lives not worth saving, and lives not worth being born. The resulting archive of thick data transmuted into financialized “Invest in a Girl” campaigns that reframed survival as a question of human capital. The book challenges readers to reject the economy as our collective container and to refuse population as a term of reproductive justice.

Lori Merish, in Archives of Labor, establishes working-class women as significant actors within literary culture, dramatically redrawing the map of nineteenth-century US literary and cultural history. Delving into previously unexplored archives of working-class women’s literature, Merish recovers working-class women’s vital presence as writers and readers in the antebellum era. She restores the tradition of working women’s class protest and dissent, shows how race and gender are central to class identity, and traces the ways working women understood themselves and were understood as workers and class subjects.

Among Arab countries, Egypt has witnessed the largest production of feminist writings as Egyptian women begin to write in the mainstream. A themed section on Egyptian women writers and feminism from the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies features three articles about Egyptian women writers and their novels, which investigate the role of gender assignation in late twentieth-century Egyptian society. These literary works interrogate assumptions about the ways in which men and women are seen and are expected to behave.

For more books and journal articles on women’s issues, check out our Read to Respond post on feminism and women’s rights. These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017.

After #Ferguson, After #Baltimore: The Challenge of Black Death and Black Life for Black Political Thought

ddsaq_116_3The most recent issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, “After #Ferguson, After #Baltimore: The Challenge of Black Death and Black Life for Black Political Thought,” edited by Barnor Hesse and Juliet Hooker, is now available.

Drawing primarily on the US #blacklivesmatter movement, contributors to this issue come to terms with the crisis in the meaning of black politics during the post–civil rights era as evidenced in the unknown trajectories of black protests. The authors’ timely essays frame black protests and the implications of contemporary police killings of black people as symptomatic of a crisis in black politics within the white limits of liberal democracy.

Topics in this issue include the contemporary politics of black rage; the significance of the Ferguson and Baltimore black protests in circumventing formal electoral politics; the ways in which centering the dead black male body draws attention away from other daily forms of racial and gender violence that particularly affect black women; the problem of white nationalisms motivated by a sense of white grievance; the international and decolonial dimensions of black politics; and the relation between white sovereignty and black life politics.

Read the introduction, made freely available.

Gendered and Sexual Mobilities

ddmew_13_2_coverThe most recent special issue of Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (JMEWS), “Gendered and Sexual Mobilities,” edited by miriam cooke, Banu Gökariksel, and Frances S. Hasso, is now available.

This issue highlights the significance of mobility for our understanding of gendered and sexual difference. The four articles explore the role of spatial mobility and immobility in the construction of gendered and sexual bodies and subjectivities. Contributors Anna J. Secor, Camila Pastor de Maria Campos, and Fatma Umut Beşpınar recognize how rarely scholars examine the perspective of marginalized gendered and sexual subjects who are deemed morally dangerous. Questioning mobility and difference, therefore, enables us to illuminate how issues of difference are fixed and framed through regimes of visibility, certification, and regulation.

Explore the table-of-contents and read the preface to the issue, now freely available.

Duke University Press Signs French National License Agreement with ISTEX

istex.pngDuke University Press has signed a major agreement with ISTEX, a French national licensing program, to make the Duke Mathematical Journal (DMJ) available to French research institutions.

With this agreement, 112 volumes of content from DMJ are made available to millions of users at over 330 French universities, grande écoles, research institutes, and libraries. Published by Duke University Press since its inception in 1935, DMJ is one of the world’s leading mathematical journals. DMJ emphasizes the most active and influential areas of current mathematics and has several distinguished French mathematicians on its editorial board. The journal has published work by the Fields Medalists Cédric Villani, Ngô Bảo Châu, Jean-Pierre Serre, and Artur Avila.

Since 2012, ISTEX has facilitated the massive acquisition of archives of scientific and mathematical production in all disciplines made available to public institutions of higher education and research in France on one central platform.

David Aymonin, Head of the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education, says, “All the four partners leading ISTEX are happy to add quality mathematics content from the Duke Mathematical Journal to the ISTEX initiative through our arrangement with Duke University Press. We see this partnership as bringing important mathematics scholarship to more researchers throughout France.”

“The Press is delighted to have the opportunity to participate in the ISTEX project by offering content from the Duke Mathematical Journal, including eminent French scholars, for use by mathematicians throughout France. We are grateful to TSP Diffusion for their support,” says Cason Lynley, Director of Marketing and Sales at Duke University Press.

DMJ content is available to ISTEX institutions on the Project Euclid platform. Read the full announcement.

Poetry and Poetics

ddbou_44_3Poetry and Poetics,” the most recent special issue of boundary 2 (44:3), emerges from a series of conferences with special emphasis on the topic of “The Social Life of Poetic Language.” This issue stresses that academic theorizing misrepresents the function and nature of poetry. It explores a range of diverse methods and topics instead to redirect contemporary theories and criticisms of poetry and poetics. 

Topics in this special issue include lengthy engagements with translation, the poetic in the social world, the new formal imperatives of poetry, and the relation between human and animal over the threshold of word and body. The contributors—Charles Bernstein, Colin Dayan, Stathis Gourgouris, and Dawn Lundy Martin—consider the issues of contemporary poetry from the long perspective of active poetics, a post-Romantic notion with origins in the long 18th century.  They show the need for a critical historical practice that understands and promotes the transformative action of poetics.

Dig into the issue now with “Too Philosophical for a Poet”: A Conversation with Charles Bernstein” by Andrew David King, made freely available.

Curating Crisis

ddthe_47_2The most recent issue of Theater, “Curating Crisis,” is the journal’s second issue devoted to the curation of performance. It includes an additional set of interviews with four leading performance curatorsFlorian Malzacher, Sodja Lotker, Miranda Wright, and Boris Charmatzthat continue the conversation of historical precedents for curators specializing in theater, dance, and other live forms. It examines the ways in which performance curators are responding to crises and conflicts both within the fields of performance, and in the spheres of politics, economics, and history.

A special section features a series of essays based on lectures originally presented in SpielART festival’s 2015 convening, “Show Me the World,” in which contributors ask how curation strategies might acknowledge and build from postcolonial contexts. The section introduces major questions provoked by rethinking the role of the curator in a time of increasingly transcultural exchange and exhibition.

“Curating Crisis” includes articles on topics such as:

  • Multiculturalism
  • Black American Performance Artistry
  • Performance Curation
  • Micropolitics
  • Performance History

and much more.

Browse the table-of-contents and read the introduction made freely available. To learn more about the topic, read “Performance Curators,” Theater’s first issue devoted to performance curation.

Symposium on the Contributions of Business to Economics

ddhope_49_2In the most recent issue of History of Political Economy, “Symposium on the Contributions of Business to Economics,” edited by Robert Van Horn and Edward Nik-khah, contributors examine how business has influenced economic policy, how businesses have actively participated in constructing economic doctrines, and how businesspersons used, engaged with, challenged, and steered economists in economic policy.

The issue focuses on the contributions of business to economics and brings together contributors from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Editors and contributors examine the historiographical challenges of determining who is an economist and who is a businessperson. These essays shed light on how the relationship between business and economics has evolved and suggest directions for future historical work.

“Symposium of the Contributions of Business to Economics” includes articles on topics such as:

  • mercantilism
  • political economy
  • epistemology
  • international trade
  • business consulting
  • science and democracy

and much more.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, made freely available.

Subject Collections in Gender Studies and Latin American Studies

As we close out another academic year, we want to remind you of useful resources for two of the strongest areas of our publishing program: gender studies and Latin American studies. In 2017, we launched new e-book subject collections in Gender Studies and Latin American Studies.

GENDER STUDIES

Our Gender Studies/Feminist Theory book list features authors well known for their work in gender studies, gay and lesbian studies, transgender studies, and queer and feminist theory. Many of our journals also address gender studies from transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives:

View the title list for the Gender Studies collection, which features more than 500 e-books and is available to libraries by purchase, lease, or lease-to-own.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

Our Latin American Studies authors are well known for their work in anthropology, art, cultural studies, Caribbean studies, Chicano and Latino studies, history, literature, film and media, and politics. Many of our journals also cover Latin America:

View the title list for the Latin American Studies collection, which features more than 500 e-books and is available to libraries by purchase, lease, or lease-to-own.

If you’re interested in gaining access to these resources, have your librarian contact our Library Relations team to get more information.

2018 Pricing is Now Available

dup_pr_filled_k_pngDuke University Press 2018 pricing for single-issue journal titles, the e-Duke Journals collections, the e-Duke Books collection, and Euclid Prime, a collection of mathematics and statistics titles hosted on Project Euclid, is now available online at dukeupress.edu/Libraries.

New Online Content Platform

In November 2017 all Duke University Press humanities and social science journals and e-books will migrate to the Silverchair Information Systems platform, providing scholars with a single reading and research experience across books and journals. Visit dukeupress.edu/Libraries/migration for additional details and to sign up for e-mail alerts.

Partnership with MSP

Duke University Press, Project Euclid, and MSP (Mathematical Sciences Publishers) have entered into a partnership to sell a package of seven MSP journals hosted on the Project Euclid platform. Institutional subscribers gain a subscription management tool that stores librarian contact and IP information. Project Euclid also exclusively provides COUNTER- and SUSHI-compliant usage statistics. Pricing for MSP on Euclid is now available online at dukeupress.edu/Libraries.

Addition of Two Titles to the 2018 Journals List

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the additions of the Journal of Korean Studies and English Language Notes to its journal list. Both journals are published biannually.

The Journal of Korean Studies is the preeminent journal in its field, publishing high-quality articles in all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences on a broad range of Korea-related topics, both historical and contemporary.

A respected forum of criticism and scholarship in literary and cultural studies since 1962, English Language Notes is dedicated to pushing the edge of scholarship in literature and related fields in new directions.

For more information about 2018 pricing, please contact our Library Relations team.

Announcing MSP on Euclid, a Partnership between MSP, Project Euclid, and Duke University Press

MSP-on-EuclidMSP (Mathematical Sciences Publishers), Project Euclid, and Duke University Press have partnered to launch the MSP on Euclid collection, bringing seven mathematics journals published by MSP together with the strong functionality available through the Project Euclid platform.

Dedicated to providing alternatives in math publishing, MSP, Project Euclid, and Duke University Press are all not-for-profit and have similarly sized programs. The goal of the MSP on Euclid collection is to offer libraries new features as well as the option to consolidate their platforms. MSP on Euclid includes the same seven journals sold by MSP in their MSP package but now also hosted by Project Euclid and sold by Duke University Press.

“Project Euclid is pleased to welcome seven of MSP’s distinguished journals to our platform and to work with Duke University Press on increasing their dissemination,” said Leslie Eager, Project Euclid’s director of publishing services. “Our three organizations strive to provide the mathematics community with truly excellent not-for-profit publishing services, and we look forward to strengthening our impact through this collaboration.”

“MSP is committed to finding new ways to make mathematics publishing more sustainable and to bring our content to scholars around the world. We hope this new collaboration will benefit researchers as well as libraries,” said Rob Kirby, chief executive of MSP.

MSP on Euclid provides institutional subscribers with valuable enhancements of the MSP package still available from MSP. Project Euclid’s platform offers libraries a subscription management tool that stores librarian contact and IP information. Institutional subscribers gain COUNTER- and SUSHI-compliant usage statistics exclusively through the platform. Single sign-on authentication through Shibboleth is also available. Duke University Press provides institutions with all sales services and customer support for the collection.

“Duke University Press has been publishing mathematics scholarship for over 80 years. We hope that our experience in math sales and customer support will bring MSP’s well-regarded, high-quality content to a wider audience,” said Steve Cohn, director of Duke University Press.

For additional information and pricing for MSP on Euclid, visit dukeupress.edu/Libraries.