Journals

Three New Journal Partnerships for 2018

In 2018, Duke University Press will begin publishing three journals: the Journal of Korean Studies, English Language Notes, and Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism. Read on to learn more about these new journal partnerships.

ddjks_22_1The Journal of Korean Studies, edited by Theodore Hughes, is the preeminent journal in its field, publishing high-quality articles in all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences on a broad range of Korea-related topics, both historical and contemporary. Korean studies is a dynamic field, with student enrollments and tenure-track positions growing throughout North America and abroad. At the same time, the Korean peninsula’s increasing importance in the world has sparked interest in Korea well beyond those whose academic work focuses on the region. Recent topics include the history of anthropology of Korea; seventeenth century Korean love stories; the Chinese diaspora in North Korea; student activism in colonial Korea in the 1940s; and GLBTQ life in contemporary South Korea. Contributors include scholars conducting transnational work on the Asia-Pacific as well as on relevant topics throughout the global Korean diaspora. The Journal of Korean Studies is based at the Center for Korean Research at Columbia University.

ELN-54.2-cover-bleedA respected forum of criticism and scholarship in literary and cultural studies since 1962, English Language Notes (ELN) is dedicated to pushing the edge of scholarship in literature and related fields in new directions. Broadening its reach geographically and transhistorically, ELN opens new lines of inquiry and widens emerging fields. Each ELN issue advances topics of current scholarly concern, providing theoretical speculation as well as interdisciplinary recalibrations through practical usage. Offering semiannual, topically themed issues, ELN also includes “Of Note,” an ongoing section featuring related topics, review essays or roundtables of cutting-edge scholarship, and emergent concerns. Edited by Laura Winkiel, ELN is a wide-ranging journal that combines theoretical rigor with innovative interdisciplinary collaboration.

Meridians15Meridians, an interdisciplinary feminist journal, provides a forum for the finest scholarship and creative work by and about women of color in U.S. and international contexts. The journal, edited by Ginetta E. B. Candlario, engages the complexity of debates around feminism, race, and transnationalism in a dialogue across ethnic, national boundaries, and disciplinary boundaries. Meridians publishes work that makes scholarship, poetry, fiction, and memoir by and about women of color central to history, economics, politics, geography, class, sexuality, and culture. The journal provokes the critical interrogation of the terms used to shape activist agendas, theoretical paradigms, and political coalitions.

Visit dukeupress.edu/journals to subscribe to these journals.

Readings on the 100th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution

October 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution and a distinct turning point in world history. Check out our books and journal issues on the Revolution and its legacy.

ddlab_14_3In the most recent issue of Labor, the journal’s Up for Debate section focuses solely on the anniversary of October 1917. In the introduction to the section, Eric Arnesen writes, “The revolution brought about by the Bolsheviks had a profound impact not merely on what was to become the Soviet Union but on the development of the Left and the fate of workers’ movements in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas as well.”

Contributors to the section track socialism throughout the last 100 years, analyze the Revolution and the American Left, and view the Revolution through a micro-history of a Brazilian metalworker of African descent. Read the essays from this section, made freely available.

978-0-8223-6949-3The centenary of the Russian Revolution is the perfect time to consider the legacy of communism. In her new book Red Hangover, Kristen Ghodsee examines the legacies of twentieth-century communism twenty-five years after the Berlin Wall fell. Ghodsee’s essays and short stories reflect on the lived experience of postsocialism and how many ordinary men and women across Eastern Europe suffered from the massive social and economic upheavals in their lives after 1989. An accessible introduction to the history of European state socialism and postcommunism, Red Hangover reveals how the events of 1989 continue to shape the world today.

dispatchesA special correspondent for the Manchester Guardian, Morgan Philips Price was one of the few Englishmen in Russia during all phases of the Revolution. Although his Bolshevik sympathies accorded him an insider’s perspective on much of the turmoil, his reports were often heavily revised or suppressed. In Dispatches from the RevolutionTania Rose collects for the first time Price’s correspondence from Russia—official and unofficial, published and unpublished—to reveal a side of Russian life and politics that fell largely unreported in the years before, during, and after the Revolution.

978-0-8223-6324-8Originally published in 1937, C. L. R. James’s World Revolution, 1917-1936 is a pioneering Marxist analysis of the history of revolutions during the interwar period and of the fundamental conflict between Trotsky and Stalin. A new definitive edition, published this year to commemorate the centenary of the Russian Revolution, features an introduction by Christian Høgsbjerg and includes rare archival material, selected contemporary reviews, and extracts from James’s 1939 interview with Trotsky.

The Russia Reader, edited by Adele Marie Barker and Bruce Grant, includes a section on the Revolution that reprints many primary documents, from The Communist Manifesto, Lenin’s The Withering Away of the State, and Viktor Shklovsky’s Revolution and the Front to Anton Okninsky’s Two Years among the Peasants in Tambov Province and letters written by ordinary Russians in the wake of the Revolution.

Forthcoming from South Atlantic Quarterly

ddsaq_116_4October! The Soviet Centenary
edited by Michael Hardt and Sandro Mezzadra

Contributors to this issue approach the October 1917 Russian Revolution and the experiments of the revolutionary period as events that opened new possibilities for politics that remain vital one hundred years later. The essays highlight how those events not only affected Russia and Europe but led to the emergence of a new political image of the world and a profound rethinking of Marxist traditions. This issue globalizes the 1917 revolution, emphasizing its echoes throughout the world and the parallel development of political possibilities beyond Russia. Topics include the Soviets from the revolution to the present, the impact of the revolution in Latin America, the work of the legal theorist Evgeny Pashukanis analyzed through the lens of the revolution, anarchist imaginaries, and the historicizing of communism.

Look for this issue of South Atlantic Quarterly in November.

Unpacking Tourism

ddrhr_129Tourism shapes popular fantasies of adventure, structures urban and natural space, creates knowledge around difference, and demands an array of occupations servicing the insatiable needs of those who travel for leisure. Even as migrants and refugees have become targets of ire from far-right parties, international tourism has grown worldwide.

The most recent issue of Radical History Review, “Unpacking Tourism,” posits a radical approach to the study of tourism, highlighting how tourism as a paradigmatic modern encounter bleeds into diplomacy, militarism, and empire building. Contributors investigate, among other topics, how the United States has used tourism in Latin America as a tool of interventionist foreign policy, how Bethlehem’s Manger Square has become a contested space between Palestinians and the Israeli state, how Spain’s economy increasingly relies on northern European tourists, and how the US military’s Cold War–era guidebooks attempted to convert soldiers stationed abroad into “ambassadors of goodwill.”

Read the introduction to the issue, made freely available.

Libraries and Publishers Working Together: an Interview with Project Euclid’s Leslie Eager

Project Euclid is a not-for-profit hosting and publishing platform for the mathematics and statistics communities, administered jointly by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press. We recently chatted with Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid at Duke University Press about the project and her position. 

Tell us a bit about yourself and your position.

LeslieEagerI became the director of publishing services for Project Euclid just over a year ago and before that worked in marketing and sales for about five years, focusing on the academic library market. Project Euclid provides online hosting services for mathematics and statistics scholarship. I was attracted to the job because I believe in the mission, and I love that it’s a small shop where one person gets to operate in many sectors of the scholarly publishing business. I studied literature and did actually minor in math and physics without expecting it to ever come up again. But here we are! Not that my college background remotely equips me to understand new mathematical research–sadly, it doesn’t, and I don’t!–but I deeply admire the field and am glad to support it.

Euclid is a quite interesting project that is jointly managed by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press. It was started at Cornell in the early 2000s when journals just started going online. Folks at the library recognized the growing demand for online publishing suddenly required small publishers to confront a whole new set of technical skills and requirements. For math journals specifically, the need to get online prompted many formerly independent and inexpensive journals to sign up with the big commercial presses like Elsevier and Springer. The journals went online, but subscription prices rose dramatically. The Library, which has long been very innovative, had a great idea that they would provide an alternative way for small, non-profit, or society publishers to get their literature online while remaining independent. The solution was Project Euclid, an online content platform for mathematics and statistics scholarship that is easy-to-use and affordable but powerful enough to be competitive.

Duke University Press joined Cornell in running Euclid in 2008, and now the folks at the Library handle the technical side of the site, and the team at the Press handles the business: publisher relations, acquisitions, marketing and sales, customer relations, finances. It means my team, that works exclusively on Euclid, also collaborates with people in the marketing and sales department, the IT department, and other staff at the Press to make the program work. We partner with about 30 publishers located all over the world, and we host about 60 active titles. Some of the titles are subscription based, some of them are open access titles, and some of them are part of collections we sell to libraries. Every publisher controls their own business model and we try to provide the most functional and affordable hosting services possible.

What is the new direction for Project Euclid?

PE

Over the last few years, our new partnerships have been more and more focused on open access models. I think mathematics is an especially idealistic and activist community, and mathematicians are speaking out forcefully against those publishing practices that tend to be very expensive and throw the entire ecosystem of library subscriptions out of whack. As a result, more and more journals are trying to cast off all those old subscription costs and operate as open access publications. Euclid tries to support this effort by providing low cost but still truly excellent hosting services to those journals. We also think it’s beneficial to be a part of the Euclid publishing community, even if you’re independent. Associating your publication with similar titles makes your open access journal more discoverable, and our specialization in mathematics and statistics allows us to make your content as compatible with other math research tools or library systems as possible. We are also trying to garner our resources to make as much material on the platform openly available as possible. Most subscription-based content on the site is governed by some kind of moving access wall determined by the publishers that makes the literature freely available after three, four, or five years. The Euclid Prime collection we sell to libraries is composed of 28 titles and after five years all of that journal content becomes open access. All told, over 70% of the articles on the site are freely available to anyone with internet access.

What are your top priorities for Project Euclid?

One of my top priorities is to communicate as effectively as possible what value Project Euclid can bring to the publishing ecosystem. Publishers have a lot of options these days. If they want it to be open access, there could be a strong temptation to sign up for a WordPress site and start throwing articles up there. This is quick and really inexpensive, but at the end of the day, they’re losing out on the kind of functionality that will actually make their journal influential and competitive with all the other big publishers that have tons of resources. So I want to communicate the practical value Euclid is providing in disseminating scholarship. I want us to be affordable but still realistic about what it means to operate a sustainable project in the current market.

Another one of my top priorities was acquiring new content for the platform, and it’s been incredibly encouraging and rewarding because we were able to add 11 new journals to the platform in 2017. That’s a combination of open access, subscription-based, and collection-based content. It feels really energizing that what I thought was going to be the most challenging piece of my job—forming new partnerships—is actually the thing that has been by far the biggest success in the very first year. It suggests there are still a lot of journals out there that could benefit from Euclid’s services.

How is the project financially structured?

PE HOST OR SALESPublishers join Project Euclid under a couple of different publishing hosting models. If they want to control all of their own marketing and sales, and they only want Euclid for hosting services, they just pay us a straight set of hosting fees based on the amount of content they publish and whether they’re open access or subscription based.

On the other hand if you’re a publisher that wants hosting services but also wants support in marketing and sales, then they can join our Euclid Prime collection. This is the collection we sell to libraries on behalf of publishers. At the end of the year, the revenue we generate from those sales is divided, and part of the money supports Euclid’s operations, and part of the money is paid out to publishers as royalties. We’re really happy the revenue from Euclid Prime sales is part of what makes it possible for us to offer these really affordable hosting fee prices to open access titles. Overall we like to think there’s balance: we hope the collections we’re selling to libraries provide good value for the library but also contribute to our mission to make as much as much of the content freely available as possible.

What are the goals you have for Project Euclid?

One of our projects for the next year is to do an exploratory audit of what is available out in the world when it comes to hosting platforms. Right now our platform is entirely homegrown and based at Cornell, but we always want to make sure we’re offering the most relevant and affordable functionality we can so we’re planning a request for information process to see what other kinds of technical solutions there are in the market and whether they would serve our customers any better.

PEPI continue to be really focused on building new partnerships, especially trying to bring new partners into the Euclid Prime collection. We think this is a really, really good way for publishers to generate sustainable revenue streams while still being really good citizens of the mathematics community and not over burdening libraries with excessive costs. I’m always in talks with new partner publishers and trying to help them make a decision to join our collection.

Our biggest new product for 2018 is our new joint partnership with MSP and Duke University Press to offer MSP on Euclid, a collection of seven journals available to libraries. MSP is a fine organization with a similar size and mission, and we hope that cooperating in a competitive marketplace will generate new opportunities for all three partners.  

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?

The most rewarding part of being on the Project Euclid team is that we are a truly mission-driven operation, and our only goal is to provide services that can help make content as available and excellent and discoverable as possible. There’s a really committed group of librarians and scholars and publishing professionals who are invested in that mission, and they come up with lots of creative ideas to push it forward. I’ve enjoyed learning from them and developing new strategies for being the best possible citizen of the scholarly publishing community.

National Coming Out Day: New Books in LGBTQ Studies

Today is the 29th annual National Coming Out Day, a celebration of the visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people. We’re happy to contribute to the occasion by sharing our newest scholarship in LGBTQ and sexuality studies.

978-0-8223-6914-1Developed in the United States in the 1980s, facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of bone and soft tissue reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of trans- women. In The Look of a Woman Eric Plemons foregrounds the narratives of FFS patients and their surgeons as they move from consultation and the operating room to postsurgery recovery. He shows how the increasing popularity of FFS represents a shift away from genital-based conceptions of trans- selfhood in ways that mirror the evolving views of what is considered to be good trans- medicine.

art1In the 1970s a group of pioneering feminist and queer entrepreneurs launched a movement that ultimately changed the way sex was talked about, had, and enjoyed. In Vibrator Nation Lynn Comella tells the fascinating history of how feminist sex-toy stores raised sexual consciousness, redefined the adult industry, and changed women’s lives. Comella describes a world where sex-positive retailers double as social activists, where products are framed as tools of liberation, and where consumers are willing to pay for the promise of better living—one conversation, vibrator, and orgasm at a time.

978-0-8223-6367-5The contributors to The War on Sex, edited by David M. Halperin and Trevor Hoppe, document how government and civil society are waging a war on stigmatized sex by means of law, surveillance, and social control—from sex offender registries to the criminalization of HIV to highly punitive measures against sex work. By examining how the ever-intensifying war on sex affects both privileged and marginalized communities, the essays collected here show why sexual liberation is indispensable to social justice and human rights.

In Disturbing Attachments Kadji Amin challenges the idealization of Jean Genet as a paradigmatic figure within queer studies to illuminate the methodological dilemmas at the heart of queer theory. Pederasty, which was central to Genet’s sexuality and to his passionate cross-racial and transnational political activism late in life, is among a series of problematic and outmoded queer attachments that Amin uses to deidealize and historicize queer theory.

978-0-8223-6365-1Critically Sovereign, a collection edited by Joanne Barker, traces the ways in which gender is inextricably a part of Indigenous politics and U.S. and Canadian imperialism and colonialism. The contributors show how gender, sexuality, and feminism work as co-productive forces of Native American and Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, and epistemology.

The most recent “In Practice” section of Camera Obscura, “Queerness and Games,” seeks to expand the relationship between feminist film theory and practice and feminist and queer video game culture and criticism. It features essays exploring topics such as Adrienne Shaw’s LGBTQ Video Game Archive, the Queerness and Games Conference (QGCon), and queer performativity in mobile device–assisted interactive play.

ddsaq_116_3The essays in South Atlantic Quarterly’sAgainst the Day” section, “Unrecognizable: On Trans Recognition in 2017,” confront urgent questions regarding transgender recognition in the current political moment. Since Trump was elected, the trans communities in the United States have expressed fear and outrage at the possibility that the “transgender tipping point” might be about to tip back. However, contributors to these essays explore the complicated relationship of the trans community to the “transgender tipping point” and express that even if recognition is inevitable, trans people may not always want to be identified. These essays invent new terms to describe the impossibility and violence of recognition and speculatively suggest an entirely different relation to visibility. In relation to the backlash, too, they argue that we cannot do trans politics without an analysis of political economy, without an analysis of the history of racialization and the violence of liberalism, as well as of hetero and gender normativity.

The Militarization of Knowledge

ddbou_44_4.coverThe Militarization of Knowledge,” the latest special issue of boundary 2, edited by Paul A. Bové, is now available.

The growth of the military and its role in producing and controlling knowledge has reordered the entire system of knowledge production and reproduction in advanced societies. The military has had a profound influence on what is thought, on the style of thinking, and the topics developed. This issue addresses the implications of these facts and how one might best think critically about this process.

Articles in this issue address the expanse of militarization and the positive and negative results of state action on knowledge.

The issue concludes with deep reflection on the consequences of such militarization to the exploration of thought problems within the social order and wonders about the results of centering the power over truth so much within the desiring apparatus of the war machine.

Read the introduction, made freely available.

Women’s Equality Day Reads

Saturday is Women’s Equality Day, and we couldn’t be more glad for an occasion both to commemorate strides in women’s rights and to renew the call for further progress. Today we’re contributing to the cause by sharing some of our most recent scholarship in women’s studies.

In the 1970s a group of pioneering feminist entrepreneurs launched a movement that ultimately changed the way sex was talked about, had, and enjoyed. Boldly reimagining who sex shops were for and the kinds of spaces they could be, these entrepreneurs opened sex-toy stores like Eve’s Garden, Good Vibrations, and Babeland not just as commercial enterprises, but to provide educational and community resources as well. In Vibrator Nation Lynn Comella tells the fascinating history of how these stores raised sexual consciousness, redefined the adult industry, and changed women’s lives.

While news of the Rwandan genocide reached all corners of the globe, the nation’s recovery and the key role of women are less well known. In Rwandan Women Rising Swanee Hunt shares the stories of some seventy women—heralded activists and unsung heroes alike—who overcame unfathomable brutality, unrecoverable loss, and unending challenges to rebuild Rwandan society.

Developed in the United States in the 1980s, facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of trans- women. In The Look of a Woman Eric Plemons foregrounds the narratives of FFS patients and their surgeons as they move from consultation and the operating room to postsurgery recovery. Plemons demonstrates how FFS is changing the project of surgical sex reassignment by reconfiguring the kind of sex that surgery aims to change.

In Politics with Beauvoir Lori Jo Marso treats Simone de Beauvoir’s feminist theory and practice as part of her political theory, arguing that freedom is Beauvoir’s central concern and that this is best apprehended through Marso’s notion of the encounter. Beauvoir’s encounters, Marso shows, exemplify freedom as a shared, relational, collective practice.

In The Labor of Faith Judith Casselberry examines the material and spiritual labor of the women of one of the oldest and largest historically Black Pentecostal churches in the United States. This male-headed church only functions through the work of the church’s women, who, despite making up three-quarters of its adult membership, hold no formal positions of power. Focusing on the circumstances of producing a holy black female personhood, Casselberry reveals the ways twenty-first-century women’s spiritual power operates and resonates with meaning in Pentecostal, female-majority, male-led churches.

wpj33_4_23_frontcover_fppIn “Interrupted,” a special issue of World Policy Journal penned entirely by female foreign policy experts and journalists, contributors imagine a world where the majority of foreign policy experts quoted, bylined, and miked are not men. The issue challenges the perception that women are not policymakers by showcasing the voices of female experts and leaders. Contributors to this issue address topics such as feminism in Chinaabortion laws across the Americascombating violent extremism by working with religious leaders, and women in media. The issue also features a conversation with Dr. Ameenah Gurib-Fakim, President of Mauritus.

In The Economization of Life Michelle Murphy provocatively describes the twentieth-century rise of infrastructures of calculation and experiment aimed at governing population for the sake of national economy. Murphy traces the methods and imaginaries through which family planning calculated lives not worth living, lives not worth saving, and lives not worth being born. The resulting archive of thick data transmuted into financialized “Invest in a Girl” campaigns that reframed survival as a question of human capital. The book challenges readers to reject the economy as our collective container and to refuse population as a term of reproductive justice.

Lori Merish, in Archives of Labor, establishes working-class women as significant actors within literary culture, dramatically redrawing the map of nineteenth-century US literary and cultural history. Delving into previously unexplored archives of working-class women’s literature, Merish recovers working-class women’s vital presence as writers and readers in the antebellum era. She restores the tradition of working women’s class protest and dissent, shows how race and gender are central to class identity, and traces the ways working women understood themselves and were understood as workers and class subjects.

Among Arab countries, Egypt has witnessed the largest production of feminist writings as Egyptian women begin to write in the mainstream. A themed section on Egyptian women writers and feminism from the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies features three articles about Egyptian women writers and their novels, which investigate the role of gender assignation in late twentieth-century Egyptian society. These literary works interrogate assumptions about the ways in which men and women are seen and are expected to behave.

For more books and journal articles on women’s issues, check out our Read to Respond post on feminism and women’s rights. These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017.

After #Ferguson, After #Baltimore: The Challenge of Black Death and Black Life for Black Political Thought

ddsaq_116_3The most recent issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, “After #Ferguson, After #Baltimore: The Challenge of Black Death and Black Life for Black Political Thought,” edited by Barnor Hesse and Juliet Hooker, is now available.

Drawing primarily on the US #blacklivesmatter movement, contributors to this issue come to terms with the crisis in the meaning of black politics during the post–civil rights era as evidenced in the unknown trajectories of black protests. The authors’ timely essays frame black protests and the implications of contemporary police killings of black people as symptomatic of a crisis in black politics within the white limits of liberal democracy.

Topics in this issue include the contemporary politics of black rage; the significance of the Ferguson and Baltimore black protests in circumventing formal electoral politics; the ways in which centering the dead black male body draws attention away from other daily forms of racial and gender violence that particularly affect black women; the problem of white nationalisms motivated by a sense of white grievance; the international and decolonial dimensions of black politics; and the relation between white sovereignty and black life politics.

Read the introduction, made freely available.

Gendered and Sexual Mobilities

ddmew_13_2_coverThe most recent special issue of Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (JMEWS), “Gendered and Sexual Mobilities,” edited by miriam cooke, Banu Gökariksel, and Frances S. Hasso, is now available.

This issue highlights the significance of mobility for our understanding of gendered and sexual difference. The four articles explore the role of spatial mobility and immobility in the construction of gendered and sexual bodies and subjectivities. Contributors Anna J. Secor, Camila Pastor de Maria Campos, and Fatma Umut Beşpınar recognize how rarely scholars examine the perspective of marginalized gendered and sexual subjects who are deemed morally dangerous. Questioning mobility and difference, therefore, enables us to illuminate how issues of difference are fixed and framed through regimes of visibility, certification, and regulation.

Explore the table-of-contents and read the preface to the issue, now freely available.

Duke University Press Signs French National License Agreement with ISTEX

istex.pngDuke University Press has signed a major agreement with ISTEX, a French national licensing program, to make the Duke Mathematical Journal (DMJ) available to French research institutions.

With this agreement, 112 volumes of content from DMJ are made available to millions of users at over 330 French universities, grande écoles, research institutes, and libraries. Published by Duke University Press since its inception in 1935, DMJ is one of the world’s leading mathematical journals. DMJ emphasizes the most active and influential areas of current mathematics and has several distinguished French mathematicians on its editorial board. The journal has published work by the Fields Medalists Cédric Villani, Ngô Bảo Châu, Jean-Pierre Serre, and Artur Avila.

Since 2012, ISTEX has facilitated the massive acquisition of archives of scientific and mathematical production in all disciplines made available to public institutions of higher education and research in France on one central platform.

David Aymonin, Head of the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education, says, “All the four partners leading ISTEX are happy to add quality mathematics content from the Duke Mathematical Journal to the ISTEX initiative through our arrangement with Duke University Press. We see this partnership as bringing important mathematics scholarship to more researchers throughout France.”

“The Press is delighted to have the opportunity to participate in the ISTEX project by offering content from the Duke Mathematical Journal, including eminent French scholars, for use by mathematicians throughout France. We are grateful to TSP Diffusion for their support,” says Cason Lynley, Director of Marketing and Sales at Duke University Press.

DMJ content is available to ISTEX institutions on the Project Euclid platform. Read the full announcement.