Journals

The Politics of the Opioid Epidemic

The Politics of the Opioid Epidemic,” the newest issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, edited by Susan L. Moffitt and Eric M. Patashnik, is freely available for three months. Read the full issue here.

In this special issue, leading political scientists from diverse theoretical traditions provide new insights into the enduring features of American policy and practice that have influenced state-level and national responses to the ongoing opioid crisis.

Key among these features is the persistent power of race in shaping public opinion of the opioid crisis, influencing the development of punitive and treatment-oriented legislation, and impacting media portrayal of opioids and the communities they affect.

Other factors include the development of the conservative welfare state and the challenges of delivering information and services to affected communities through existing, dysfunctional systems.

Care in Uncertain Times Syllabus

As we collectively deal with the implications of social distancing, stay-at-home orders, and a global pandemic, questions of care and self-care have become ever more important.

Free to read online through June 30, the books, journal issues, and articles in our new Care in Uncertain Times Syllabus investigate different ways that care can bind together individuals and communities where larger institutions or governments fail to intervene. They show how radical care is essential to enduring precarity and to laying the groundwork for new futures.

Start reading here.

Now Available Open Access: Hispanic American Historical Review, 1918–1999

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We are glad to announce that all 20th-century volumes (1918–1999) of the Hispanic American Historical Review have been digitized and are now available open access.

Start reading here.

We are proud to offer this open-access resource, especially during a challenging time when many scholars are accessing resources remotely. This long run of issues allows for students and researchers alike to trace the development of key themes in Latin American historiography across time.

Founded in 1918, HAHR pioneered the study of Latin American history and culture in the United States. Today, HAHR publishes rigorous scholarship on every facet of Latin American history and culture. It is edited by Martha Few, Zachary Morgan, Matthew Restall, and Amara Solari.

“[HAHR] has been central now for a hundred years in helping establish the field and really point to the absolute best scholarship within Latin American history,” said Gisela Fosado, editorial director at Duke University Press and member of the HAHR Board of Editors. “It’s always going to be pushing the field, defining the field, bringing out a really wide range of voices.”

Free Duke University Press resources via Project MUSE

In response to current challenges scholars face as a result of COVID-19, Duke University Press is opening archival content for around 20 of our journals hosted on Project MUSE.

Around five years of back content (1999 to 2004) are freely available through June 30, 2020, for select titles. We are also opening all available content for East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal.

Titles included are:

“As so many institutions transition to online instruction, we hope that these additional resources will be useful,” said Kimberly Steinle, Library Relations and Sales Manager.

Read more about the additional support Duke University Press is offering to scholars and libraries at this time. A complete list of publishers offering free resources on MUSE is available here.

(en)gendering: Chinese Women’s Art in the Making

“(en)gendering: Chinese Women’s Art in the Making,” the latest issue of positions: asia critique, edited by Shuqin Cui, is available now.

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While contemporary Chinese art has arrived as a critical subject in art history and found market success, current art criticism has yet to fully engage with art made by Chinese women, especially from the perspective of gender politics. In this special issue, contributors consider how the work of contemporary women artists has generated new approaches to and perspectives on the Chinese art canon.

The issue begins by laying a historical framework for the potentials and problems regarding the interpretation of Chinese women’s art, tracing its evolution throughout a century of Chinese history. Next, the issue addresses the spatial notion of boundary crossing, addressing how travel across national and theoretical boundaries affects the perception of artworks, and explores the misgivings of Chinese women artists about participating in a global exhibition system in which their artwork stands for “China” and “Women.” The issue concludes by looking at the idea of (en)gendering as a revision of women’s art prompting artists and the viewers of women’s artworks to challenge the conventional gaze that has dominated our ways of seeing.

Browse the issue’s contents and read the introduction, freely available.

Celebrating Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month where studying, observing, and celebrating the role women have had and continue to have in American history is encouraged. While recognizing the achievements, it’s also important to acknowledge the struggles women face and have overcome. We’re excited to share recent books and journals from Duke University Press that align with this mission and celebrate women around the world and throughout history.

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In Honeypot, E. Patrick Johnson combines magical realism, poetry, and performative writing to bear witness to the real-life stories of black southern queer women in ways that reveal the complexity of identity and the challenges these women face.

In Invisibility by Design, Gabriella Lukács traces how young Japanese women’s unpaid labor as bloggers, net idols, “girly” photographers, online traders, and cell phone novelists was central to the development of Japan’s digital economy in the 1990s and 2000s.

Lynn M. Thomas’ Beyond the Surface constructs a transnational history of skin lighteners in South Africa and beyond, theorizing skin and skin color as a site for antiracist struggle and lighteners as a technology of visibility that both challenges and entrenches racial and gender hierarchies.

978-1-4780-0645-9The concluding volume in a poetic triptych, Alexis Pauline Gumbs’s Dub: Finding Ceremony takes inspiration from theorist Sylvia Wynter, dub poetry, and ocean life to offer a catalog of possible methods for remembering, healing, listening, and living otherwise.

Laura E. Pérez analyzes Latina art to explore a new notion of decolonial thought and love based on the integration of body, mind, and spirit that offers a means to creating a more democratic and just present and future in Eros Ideologies.

From The Guiding Light to Passions, Elana Levine traces the history of daytime television soap operas as an innovative and highly gendered mass cultural form in Her Stories.

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In Mafalda: A Social and Political History of Latin America’s Global Comic, Isabella Cosse examines the history, political commentary, and influence of the world-famous comic character Mafalda from her Argentine origins in 1964 to her global reach in the 1990s.

In Naked Agency, Naminata Diabate explores how the deployment of defiant nakedness by mature women in Africa challenges longstanding assumptions about women’s political agency.

Radical Transnationalism,” a new issue of Meridians, looks at the expansive domains of transnational feminism, considering its relationship to different regions, historical periods, fields, and methodologies. The issue’s contributors, working in locations across the Global South and North, investigate settler colonialism, racialization, globalization, militarization, decoloniality, and anti-authoritarian movements as gendered political and economic projects.

Collected to honor the work of French women’s history scholar Rachel G. Fuchs, the essays in French Historical Studies issue “Patriarchy, Protection, and Women’s Agency in Modern France” touch on interrelated themes central to nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France, including evolving forms of male power expressed through paternity, the victimization of women and children resulting from industrial capitalism and male abuse of power, and the development of mechanisms to protect the abused through surveillance of potential victims.

Navigating the Threat of Pandemic

Amid the worldwide spread of COVID-19, it’s a challenging time, and our thoughts are with those affected by this disease. In support and solidarity, we are providing free access to books and journal articles that we hope will build knowledge and understanding of how we navigate the spread of communicable diseases.

Our “Navigating the Threat of Pandemic” syllabus is available here. Listed books are free to read online until June 1, 2020, and journal articles are free until October 1.

Black History Month Reads

To celebrate Black History Month, we are featuring some of our recent books and journals that explore Black and African-American history, issues, and culture.

Honeypot

In Honeypot, E. Patrick Johnson combines magical realism, poetry, and performative writing to bear witness to the real-life stories of black southern queer women in ways that reveal the complexity of identity and the challenges these women face.

The concluding volume in a poetic triptych that began with Spill, and continued with M Archive, Alexis Pauline Gumbs’s Dub: Finding Ceremony takes inspiration from theorist Sylvia Wynter, dub poetry, and ocean life to offer a catalog of possible methods for remembering, healing, listening, and living otherwise.

In Everything Man, Shana L. Redmond traces Paul Robeson’s continuing cultural resonances in popular culture and politics, showing how he remains a vital force and presence for all those he inspired.

afterlife ofIn The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery, Alys Eve Weinbaum investigates the continuing resonances of Atlantic slavery in the cultures and politics of human reproduction that characterize contemporary capitalism, showing how black feminist thought offers the best means through which to understand the myriad ways slavery continues to haunt the present.

Allyson Nadia Field and Marsha Gordon examine the place and role of race in educational films, home movies, industry and government films, anthropological films, church films, and other forms of noncommercial filmmaking throughout the twentieth century in Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film.

Peoples History of DetroitMark Jay and Philip Conklin use a Marxist framework to tell a sweeping story of Detroit from 1913 to the present in A People’s History of Detroit, which comes out in May. It outlines the complex socio-political dynamics underlying major events in Detroit’s past, from the rise of Fordism and the formation of labor unions to deindustrialization and the city’s recent bankruptcy. 

In Art for People’s Sake, Rebecca Zorach traces the little-told story of the Black Arts Movement in Chicago, showing how its artistic innovations, institution building, and community engagement helped the residents of Chicago’s South and West Sides respond to social, political, and economic marginalization.

In Black Madness :: Mad Blackness, Therí Alyce Pickens examines the speculative and science fiction of Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, and Tananarive Due to rethink the relationship between race and disability, thereby unsettling the common theorization that they are mutually constitutive.

UnfixedJennifer Bajorek traces the relationship between photography and decolonial politics in Francophone west Africa in the years immediately leading up to and following independence from French colonial rule in 1960 in Unfixed. She shows how photography both reflected and actively contributed to social and political change. 

In Beneath the Surface, Lynn M. Thomas constructs a transnational history of skin lighteners in South Africa and beyond theorizing skin and skin color as a site for antiracist struggle and lighteners as a technology of visibility that both challenges and entrenches racial and gender hierarchies.

Beyond countering the brutalizing omission of black British artists in both the art scene and art history chronicles, “Black British Art Histories,” an issue of Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, presents perceptive, probing, and illuminating considerations of a range of artists whose practices are fascinating, complex, and of great art-historical importance.

The essays in “Trajectories in Race and Diaspora: Entangled Histories and Affinities of Transgression,” an issue of Qui Parle edited by Donna Honarpisheh, unfold at the dynamic intersections of race and diaspora in a global context. Each essay is preoccupied with how race—as an ontological category born of violence—produces edges, wounds, or incisions that nurture opportunities for further ontological transgressions with possible liberatory potentials.

The Return of Economic Planning

“The Return of Economic Planning,” the latest issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, edited by Campbell Jones, is available now.

Contributors to this special issue propose placing economic planning firmly back on the agenda of Left politics. Today, capital and the capitalist state are fully planned, yet economic planning remains a key site of political struggle, and it exists in diverse places and forms—in algorithms, in sites of dispute, in communes, in music, and coming from above or below.

The authors explore new ways of seeing and thinking about economic planning, arguing that the question is no longer whether or not to plan but rather what kind of economic planning is taking place, what purpose it is serving, and who is included in making and executing plans.

Check out authors Matteo Mandarini and Alberto Toscano’s article, “Planning for Conflict,” freely available for three months.

The issue’s Against the Day section, “Mediterranea: Sea Rescue as Political Action,” brings together researchers and activists to discuss migrant projects of freedom. All articles in this section are freely available for six months.

Browse the issue’s contents and read the introduction, freely available.

Revolutionary Positions: Gender and Sexuality in Cuba and Beyond

As the Cuban revolution reaches its 60th anniversary, “Revolutionary Positions: Gender and Sexuality in Cuba and Beyond,” a new issue of Radical History Review edited by Michelle Chase and Isabella Cosse, offers an exploration of the revolution’s impact through the lens of sexuality and gender.

The contributors to this issue study Cuban internationalist campaigns, the relationship between cultural diplomacy and mass media, and visual images of revolution and solidarity. They follow the emergence and negotiation of new gender ideals through the transgendering of Che’s “New Man,” the Cuban travels of Angela Davis, calls for sexual revolution in the Dutch Atlantic, and gender representations during the 1964 “Campaign of Terror” in Chile. In doing so, the authors provide fresh insight into Cuba’s transnational legacy on politics and culture during the Cold War and beyond.

Browse the table of contents, and start reading with Sarah J. Seidman’s article “Angela Davis in Cuba as Symbol and Subject,” free through the end of May.

You may also enjoy Isabella Cosse’s book Mafalda: A Social and Political History of Latin America’s Global Comic, first published in Argentina in 2014 and now available in English, which analyzes the vast appeal of the Argentinian comic Mafalda and its exploration of complex topics such as class identity, modernization, and state violence.