Literature

Literature, Activism, and Gendered Intimacy in Modern and Contemporary Iran

coverimageLiterature, Activism, and Gendered Intimacy in Modern and Contemporary Iran,” a new special issue of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, explores Iranian gendered and national identities and experiences in the aftermath of European imperialism and the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

Contributors call attention to the lived experiences of women in modern-to-contemporary Iranian society, showcasing the agency and creativity of their responses to these experiences.

Articles include:

Explore the contents here or purchase this issue.

W. G. Sebald and the Global Valences of the Critical

The newest issue of boundary 2, “W. G. Sebald and the Global Valences of the Critical,” edited by Sina Rahmani, is now available.

Since his death nearly two decades ago, W. G. Sebald’s literary star among academics and critics has risen to astounding heights. In this special issue, contributors assert that Sebald’s transformation from controversial yet obscure Germanist to seemingly permanent fixture of scholarly monographs, articles, reviews, syllabi, and conference proceedings offers an instructive glimpse behind the velvet rope of global literary eminence.

His meteoric rise, they argue, shines a light on the hegemonic role the Anglophone literary market plays in the processes that authors and their texts undergo when they migrate from a national literary market to a planetary readership.

Read the free introduction, as well as Uwe Schütte’s “Troubling Signs: Sebald, Ambivalence, and the Function of the Critic,” available free through the end of October.

Indigenous Narratives of Territory and Creation: Hemispheric Perspectives

The newest issue of English Language Notes, “Indigenous Narratives of Territory and Creation: Hemispheric Perspectives,” edited by Leila Gómez, is now available.

Indigenous activism in the Americas has long focused on the symbolic reclamation of land. Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives, contributors to this issue explore narratives of territory and origin that provide a foundation for this political practice. They study Indigenous-language stories from displaced communities, analyzing the meaning and power of these narratives in the context of diaspora and the struggle for land.

Essays address topics including territorial struggle and environmentalism, Indigenous resistance to neoliberal policies of land dispossession, and alliances between academic and Indigenous knowledges and activisms.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.