Press News

Flash Sale: Save 50% on all Art & Photography Books

FLASH50_SaleDec2017_200x300_72dpiWe’re excited to announce a special three-day Flash Sale on all of our in-stock art, art history, and photography books and journal issues. To claim the discount, enter the coupon code FLASH50 when checking out.

What are some of the great gift-worthy titles you can get during this sale? All of the the Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize winners are included. Check out the latest winner, Test of Faith by Lauren Pond,  a deeply nuanced, personal look at serpent handling in Appalachia.

Or perhaps you’d like to order a gorgeous special issue of NKA_38_prour journal Nka, such as “Black Portraiture[s]: The Black Body in the West.” Edited by Cheryl Finley and Deborah Willis, it’s full of fascinating essays and artwork. Or grab a catalog from a recent Nasher Museum of Art show, such as Miranda Lash’s and Trevor Schoonmaker’s Southern Accent, which investigates the many realities, fantasies, and myths of the South that have long captured the public’s imagination, while presenting a wide range of perspectives that create a composite portrait of southern identity through contemporary art.

If art history is more your style, check out Collective Situations, edited by Bill Kelley Jr. and Grant H. Kester, or try Jessica Horton’s Art for an Undivided Earth, about the American Indian Movement generation, or MacArthur “genius grant” awardee Kellie Jones’s most recent book, South of Pico.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. And you can’t combine multiple orders to maximize the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

Hurry and shop now on dukeupress.edu because this sale ends at 11:59 pm on Friday, December 8.

Thomas Carlyle and the London Library

Thomas CarlyleThomas Carlyle’s 222nd birthday was yesterday, 4 December. In his honor, we are sharing several lectures on Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle given by Carlyle scholars Brent Kinser and David Sorensen this June at the Carlyle House in Chelsea. The event focused on Carlyle’s involvement with the London Library, the world’s greatest circulating library. Kinser and Sorensen were joined by Helen O’Neill, Librarian of the London Library.

Read the full versions of the talks from David Sorensen and Brent Kinser by selecting the titles of the lectures. We have included excerpts from the talks below.

AN EXCERPT FROM DAVID SORENSEN’S TALK, “Carlyle and the London Library

This evening we acknowledge one of Thomas Carlyle’s most noble, generous, and enduring acts of civic philanthropy: his founding of the London Library in St. James’s Square, a scheme which he first proposed in a speech that he delivered at the Freemason’s Tavern on June 24, 1840, which was reported four days later in the Examiner newspaper. It is worth rehearsing the circumstances behind this address, because they reveal the unusual combination of both personal and professional factors that prompted Carlyle to launch a campaign for the establishment of a new lending library in the center of London. Carlyle was forty-five years old when he began to formulate this plan: by this stage of his career he was the author of the Sartor Resartus and The French Revolution, a renowned public lecturer, and a committed social activist seeking to awaken the Victorian conscience to what he called “The Condition of England Question.”

In 1839 he was preparing to embark on another great historical quest, this time an edition of the letters and speeches of Oliver Cromwell. His experience with the French Revolution had taught him the urgent need of a high-class lending library which would provide him with the works that he required at hand in his quiet study upstairs in this house. He was embarrassed by the want of standard reference sources, and of the difficulty of working quietly in the British Museum. At Cambridge friends procured him copies of Clarendon and Rushworth, but as journeys from Chelsea to Bloomsbury became more laborious, he was determined to try what could be done to found in London a permanent lending library of standard literature. In a letter to his mother of 13 January 1839 he wrote, “Another object that engages me a little in these last weeks is the attempt to see whether a Public Library cannot be got here in London; a thing scandalously wanted, which I have suffered from like others. There is to be some stir made in that business now, and it really looks as if it would take effect.”

AN EXCERPT FROM BRENT KINSER’S TALK, “Carlyle, Gladstone, and the Neapolitan Candidate

On 4 May 1852, the first librarian of the London Library, J. G. Cochrane (b. 1780), breathed his last. The next Day Thomas Carlyle wrote to his brother Jack with a mixture of real sadness and practical exigency: “Poor old lumbering good-natured soul, I am sad to think of him, and that we shall never see him more.— [John Edward] Jones will summon a Comee Meeting so soon as the funeral is over: I know not in the least what they mean to do; but suppose they will find it good to be in no haste, but to pause well and to examine” (CLO: TC to JAC, 5 May 1852). There would be little pause in the effort to replace Cochrane, and the drama surrounding the appointment of his successor offers fascinating insights into the relationship between two of the London Library committee’s most important and influential members: Carlyle and William Ewart Gladstone.

In May 1852 Carlyle found himself incapacitated with the flu, which greatly reduced his ability to be directly involved with the discussions surrounding the choice of the next librarian, but greatly, and for us fortunately, increased his need to negotiate the choice in letters. Because of his illness, he sent Jane to see John Forster to relay his wishes: Carlyle wanted a complete accounting of the condition of the library before any move was made to choose Cochrane’s successor. As he had told his brother, Carlyle wanted a patient, careful process to unfold. Jane returned to report a “revolution,” which Carlyle relayed to his brother on 10 May:

Forster as I knew he wd, patronised all these salutary notions, ready to swear for them on the Koran if needful; but at the same time said, there was not the least hope of getting them carried; or anything but one carried, viz. the Election of Gladstone’s Neapolitan,—whh G. and his Helpers “were stirring Heaven and Earth to bring about; and which from the prest composition of the Committee (Milman, Lyttelton, Milnes, Hallam &c, a clear majority of malleable material, some of it as soft as butter, under the hammer of a Minister in posse [with that capacity]) they were “perfectly certain” to do it. . . . Gladstone, I think with Forster, will probably succeed: but he shall not do it without one man at least insisting on having Reason and common Honesty as well as Gladstone and Charity at other men’s expense, satisfied in the matter; and protesting to a plainly audible extent against the latter amiable couple walking over the belly of the former.— Such protest I am clearly bound to; and that, I believe, will prove to be all that I can do. Of Gladstone’s Neapolitan no man, Italian or other, has ever heard the name before: from G.’s own acct to me, I figured him as some ingenuous bookish young advocate, who probably had helped G. in his Pamphlets underhand,—a useful service, but not done to the Ln Library particularly. (CLO: TC to JAC, 10 May 1852)

The underlying reason for Carlyle’s dismay seems apparent enough. As if it were not bad enough dealing with one Neapolitan librarian, Anthony Panizzi of the British Museum, Gladstone had put forward a second one to take charge of Carlyle’s beloved London Library.

 

drs-bek-ho london 2017Stay connected! Learn more about Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle and to read their many letters, visit the Carlyle Letters Online. Follow @carlyleletters for daily tweets from these prolific writers.

Now Available from Duke University Press: T-Shirts!

We are excited to announce that in addition to all our great books and journals, you can now purchase two new t-shirts from Duke University Press.

Show the world your support for transgender rights and our journal TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly by wearing a shirt featuring artwork from the journal’s very first issue cover.

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You can also show the world that you know that to expose a problem is to pose a problem by wearing a Feminist Killjoy t-shirt inspired by Sara Ahmed’s book Living a Feminist Life.

Feminist Killjoy Group

We even have limited numbers of Feminist Killjoy shirts in kids’ sizes.

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The shirts come in sizes Small through 2-XL. They are a soft cotton-polyester blend. They are $20 each for adult sizes and $15 for kids. They make a great gift, but be sure to order in the next week to ensure Christmas delivery. We regret that we are currently unable to ship t-shirts outside of the United States. The shirts will also be available at many of the academic meetings we attend including AAA, MLA, and AHA.

Duke University Press to Bring James Baldwin’s Only Children’s Book Back Into Print

LittleManLittleManLittle Man, Little Man is the only children’s book by acclaimed writer James Baldwin. Published in 1976 by Dial Press, the book quickly went out of print. Now, at a time when Baldwin is more popular than ever, and readers, librarians, and booksellers are clamoring for more diverse children’s books, Duke University Press is proud to bring the book back into print. It will be available in August 2018.

In the book, four-year-old TJ spends his days on his lively Harlem block playing with his best friends WT and Blinky and running errands for neighbors. As he comes of age as a “Little Man” with big dreams, TJ faces a world of grown-up adventures and realities. Little Man, Little Man celebrates and explores the challenges and joys of black childhood. In it we not only see life in 1970s Harlem from a black child’s perspective; we gain a fuller appreciation of the genius of one of America’s greatest writers.

James Baldwin called Little Man, Little Man a “celebration of the self-esteem of black children.” In their brief introduction to the book, Baldwin scholars Nicholas Boggs and Jennifer DeVere Brody explain that the illustrations and text invite readers to “look again and experience the social ills represented in the book—violence, economic disparity, alcoholism and drug abuse, and the distortions of mass media—from the perspective of a black child, and one, it is important to note in closing, who is not innocent.” They suggest that audiences at the time were not ready for this perspective, which might explain the book’s initial reception.

Duke University Press’s new edition of Little Man, Little Man retains the charming original illustrations by French artist Yoran Cazac and includes a foreword by Baldwin’s nephew Tejan “TJ” Karefa-Smart (the inspiration for the title character) and an afterword by his niece Aisha Karefa-Smart.

Booksellers wanting more information or wishing to place an order for the book can contact Sales Manager Jennifer Schaper at jennifer.schaper@dukeupress.edu.

All other inquiries: Laura Sell, Publicity, lsell@dukeupress.edu or 919-687-3639.

Little Man, Little Man: A Story of Childhood
By James Baldwin. Illustrated by Yoran Cazac.
Edited and with an introduction by Nicholas Boggs and Jennifer DeVere Brody
With a foreword by Tejan Karefa and an afterword by Aisha Karefa-Smart
ISBN: 978-1-4780-0004-4
Hardcover, 128 pages, $22.95
Fully illustrated in color
August 2018

University Press Week: #Twitterstorm

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Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is #TwitterStorm, featuring posts about how authors and university presses use social media to spread their messages. Check out the video above to see our author Lynn Comella discuss how she considers social media a form of activism. Then head over to Harvard University Press to get a look at how social media has played a role in the publication of Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide. Next, Greg Britton, Editorial Director of Johns Hopkins University Press, extols the virtues of Twitter. Athabasca University Press showcases how they utilized social media channels to create a citywide book club. Finally, a post from Beacon Press demonstrates how social media has helped advertise and keep conversation going about Christopher Edmin’s For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too.

Come back tomorrow for a great Veterans Day post from us and more from the University Press Week blog tour. And keep sharing your love for university presses on social media with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

University Press Week: Producing the Books that Matter

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Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is Producing the Books that Matter. Visit University of Kansas Press to learn about how editorial and production departments work together to create books. Then head to University of Michigan Press for an interview with Jay Timothy Dolmage, author of their upcoming book Academic Ableism. David Goodwin will talk about the production of his book Left Bank of the Hudson, which was published this Fall by Fordham University Press. At University of Washington Press, their press director and president of the AAUP, Nicole Mitchell, will write about the value of university presses. Yale University Press will be featuring an episode of their podcast on the making of the Voynich Manuscript. UBC Press offers a post on the challenges and rewards of working closely with an author to develop a book for a general rather than a scholarly audience. University of California Press and Georgetown University Press are also participating.

Check back here tomorrow for more great blog posts and don’t forget to share your love for university presses online with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

University Press Week 2017: Knowledge Matters

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It’s University Press Week! University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society. We’ll be celebrating with displays at the Durham County Library‘s South Regional branch, the Hayti Heritage Center, North Carolina Central University library, and around Duke University’s campus at the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Music Library, the Office for Faculty Advancement, the John Hope Franklin Center, the Nicholas School of the Environment, and the Center for Multicultural Affairs. If you’re in Durham please stop by and check out some of our recent titles and pick up a free bookmark, pen, or magnet.

This year’s University Press Week Theme is #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters. In today’s political climate—where “fake news” and “alternate facts” are believed by so many people—valuing expertise and knowledge can feel like a radical act. University presses not only believe in facts and knowledge, but traffic in them daily, publishing approximately 14,000 books and more than 1,100 journals each year, read by people around the globe.

We launched our “Read to Respond” series to highlight some of our own groundbreaking scholarship that engages with today’s pressing issues. Each topic, from student activism to racial justice, is highlighted with a reading list that encourages students and teachers alike to join the conversation surrounding these current events. Check out your favorite “Read to Respond” topics below and share these resources in and out of the classroom. These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017.

We now encourage you to learn more about the important work of university presses by checking out the week-long blog tour. Each day has a different theme and will feature posts by five-ten different presses. Today’s theme is Scholarship Making a Difference. Begin at Temple University Press for a post on scholarship on racism and whiteness. Then head to Wayne State University Press to read about their upcoming book on slavery in 21st-century America. University Press of Colorado has a feature on their post-truth focused titles. At Princeton University Press, Al Bertrand writes on the importance of non-partisan peer reviewed social science in today’s political climate. George Mason University Press offers a post on the path to discovery of an overlooked and misunderstood yet influential historical figure, William Playfair. At University of Toronto Press, their history editor in higher education discusses the importance of making scholarship accessible to students and the role of publishers in helping to build better citizens. Wilfrid Laurier University Press offers a roundup of their Indigenous scholarship with commentary from the series editor about its importance. Oregon State University Press  Finally, stop at Cambridge University Press to see their post.

Check back here each day to see the stops on the blog tour and our own University Press Week posts. Don’t forget to share with the hashtags #ReadUP and #LookItUP!

Internship Series: Five Steps to Ace an Interview with Confidence

This post is a part of a four part blog series covering the interns at Duke University Press. Today’s post provides information on preparing for an interview. There are a variety of of interview styles companies use for interviewing potential interns and employees. Duke University Press conducts behavioral interviews to understand how you have handled situations in previous positions and how you will handle potential situations at The Press. These interviews can occur on the phone, in traditional locations including in in the office, or an auditorium at Duke University for a speed dating formatted interview. We asked interns to share their list of interview dos and don’ts after successfully securing their current positions at Duke University Press.

Business people greeting and handshakeBe early. Being early is the most common tip the current Duke University Press interns have to offer future interns. They suggested a range of times between 5 and 30 minutes early. Giving yourself enough time to arrive is very important, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the location where you are interviewing.

Be yourself and don’t downplay your accomplishments. One the best things you can do during an interview is to be yourself. If an interviewee does falsify their personality or qualifications and are hired, the intern runs the risk of losing their position for fabricated information. Display confidence when describing previous experience because your experiences are valuable to you as a person and potentially to the company you’re applying for. The interview is the chance to impress the interviewer and the company with the skills you already have to offer and explain how their company can help you grow professionally.

Dress appropriately and professionally and don’t bring your phone. To do this you must find the balance between being professional without being too under- or too overdressed. It’s important to dress within their dress code. While Duke University Press has a relaxed dress code, it’s still important to follow business casual dress code for interviews. Leave phones and other distracting devices in the car, your bag, or just turn them off. Devote your full attention in the interview and don’t let your phone get in the way of the interview.

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Prepare what you’d like to say so you don’t show your nerves. Speaking the first phrase that comes to your mind may not be the best answer for the question you’re asked. It’s more beneficial to gather your thoughts before saying them. This could be the difference of showing a person is well prepared or not. Know the questions you would like to be answered to help you obtain a better understanding of what the position will be. The questions you ask can show the interviewer the research you have already done on the company and will allow them to see your investment in the internship and organization. To defeat the negative effects of nervousness, remain confident in your skills and participate in mock interviews with a mentor, professor, or a campus career center employee to practice interview skills.

Bring a folder and pen. The folder you bring to an interview should contain enough copies of your resume for the interviewers, yourself and an extra, just in case. Include paper and your prepared questions. This will ensure all of the questions you may have are answered. Write any important information the interviewer gives you and to write any questions that come to mind during the interview.

Internship Series: Letters to the Press

We have created a four part blog series covering interns at Duke University Press. Today’s post delves into the most important parts of the internship application process — cover letters and resumes. If a cover letter or resume does not reflect a candidate well, the candidate will most likely not be interviewed or considered for the job. Interns at Duke University Press confirmed that their personalized cover letters helped them secure their internship positions. 

A cover letter creates a first impression of a candidate for the organization to which they are applying. One of the main purposes of a cover letter is to allow the employer to understand who the candidates are beyond the bullet points of resumes. This is the perfect opportunity to explain how you as a candidate are the right person for the position open. You are able to go into detail about parts of your resume and describe how you are qualified because of other areas of experience.

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When writing a cover letter and resume, your experience listed and discussed should directly relate to the job you’reapplying for. All submitted material should be unique to each company. A canned cover letter and resume could reflect poorly on you because it’s not personalized. Many of the interns at Duke University Press credit their unique cover letters that accompanied their resumes for securing their internship position at the press.

If applying for a job you are under-qualified for, the cover letter allows you to express what experience you have had without reaching the amount of years required or lacking a certain skill. You’re able to explain how you excel at the more important skills for the job and are willing to learn the skills the employer is looking for.

To gain more experience for a future position without having much prior experience, the Duke University Press interns emphasized the importance of volunteering. “Volunteering is number one. Being in the work environment, although you’re not getting paid, you’re still doing work. This makes your time more valuable and your ideas more valuable,” Charlecia Walton, a front desk intern, said. Sharing volunteer experience represents a passion for the work  you are doing to a hiring manager. Volunteer experience is sometimes easier to earn than paid positions. If you are having a hard time getting an internship or job, you might want to consider volunteering your time for experience that you can feature on your resume or cover letter.

Internship Series: Finding the Perfect Internship 101

This post is a part of a four part blog series covering interning at Duke University Press. Today’s post offers tips on searching for and deciding on an internship that is perfect for you.

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The Press advertises internship positions at all colleges and universities in the Triangle. Three current interns found the internship listings using their universities’ career websites created for students to search jobs and internships within their fields. Many others said they’ve found their university’s career website helpful for internship searches. Other suggested sites to find internship opportunities include indeed.com, glassdoor.com, and internships.com.

To easily compare internships you would potentially enjoy, you should research all the ways the job could potentially benefit you and make note of your needs and wants from an internship. This will help the process of researching the company with a direct goal of discovering how you would fit into the position you’re applying for. For students, it would be beneficial to search for internships that would be relevant to your coursework and future success. You can use the information found to your advantage in your resume, cover letter, and interview. Many interns said they appreciate their internships at Duke University Press because they experience being student workers while being treated as equal employees and are able to learn from the rewarding work they are given. Social Medicine Reader Intern, Emily Chilton, shared that the learning opportunities and professional experiences she’s had at Duke University Press will help her future career in academic publishing.

-how to be a full-stack developer- (1)It is possible that you may find an internship you are very interested in, but your experience may not meet all of the requirements listed in the job posting. Several interns emphasized the importance of applying even if a person does not meet all of the requirements. According to Forbes writer Nancy F. Clark, men are confident in applying for positions if they meet 60% of the qualifications in a job description, while women only apply if they meet 100% of the qualifications. In a later article, Forbes Magazine described the benefits to hiring under-qualified employees. These benefits include: less established employees have more room for growth, they don’t have bad habits to break, only good habits to learn, they have the right attitude, and you can build lifelong relationships. Both men and women should apply for jobs they may not think they’re qualified because it’s difficult to know exactly where the employer places emphasis on experience. Though someone may meet all the requirements, they may not have as much experience as another person in a particular area that the employer wants.

Journals Marketing Manager Jocelyn Dawson confirmed that experience is not everything when being considered for an internship position at the Press. “We’ve found that our best interns are not necessarily those with prior experience in publishing, or even in marketing,” said Dawson. “We expect that interns will learn about those things from us, and are instead prioritizing qualities like enthusiasm for learning and for our mission, attention to detail, a proactive approach, and, because not all intern tasks are glamorous, a positive attitude.”

Internships are learning experiences. If you’re serious about the position, inform the interviewer or hiring manager how the company can benefit from the experience you do have and how they will help you grow professionally with everything you can learn from the internship position.