Press News

Illinois Journal of Mathematics Joins Duke University Press

Duke University Press is pleased to announce that the Illinois Journal of Mathematics (IJM) will join its publishing program beginning in 2019. IJM is edited by Steven Bradlow and sponsored by the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

IJM was founded in 1957 by Reinhold Baer, Joseph L. Doob, Abraham Taub, George Whitehead, and Oscar Zariski.  The inaugural volume featured papers of many of the world’s leading figures in the key areas of mathematics at the time: William Feller, Paul Levy, and Paul Malliavin in probability theory; Richard Bellman, R. P. Boas, Jack Hale, and Edwin Hewitt in analysis; Marvin Marcus, Olga Taussky, and Oscar Zariski in algebra; and Paul Erdös, L. J. Mordell, and John Tate in number theory. Since then, IJM has published many influential papers, including the proof of the Four Color Conjecture by Kenneth Appel and Wolfgang Haken.

The journal aims to disseminate at reasonable cost significant new, peer-reviewed results in all active areas of mathematics research. In addition to its regular editions it has published special volumes in honor of distinguished members of its host department including R. Baer, D. Burkholder, J. D’Angelo, J. Doob, P. Griffith, W. Haken, and P. Schupp. The journal’s editorial board, which counts distinguished mathematicians such as J. Bourgain, A. Calderon, S.S. Chern, H. Kesten, and K. Uhlenbeck among its past members, comprises a mix of preeminent mathematicians from within its host department and across the mathematical research establishment.

“We are proud to be associated with the outstanding Duke University Press mathematics publishing program and its flagship journal, the Duke Mathematical Journal,” said Steven Bradlow, Editor-in-Chief of IJM.

“Duke University Press is delighted to establish a partnership with the Department of Mathematics at UIUC to publish its long-established and highly regarded journal,” said Rob Dilworth, Journals Director at Duke University Press. “Positioned alongside the Duke Mathematical Journal and the other mathematics journals at Duke, we look forward to providing our expert mathematics publishing support to the editors as they and we work together to ensure that IJM continues to be a valuable resource to the entire mathematics research community.”

Duke University Press will start its publication of IJM with volume 63, which will feature a redesigned look. The first issue of the volume will be available spring of 2019. The journal will continue to be hosted online via Project Euclid.

Editorial Office of Duke Mathematical Journal Returns to Duke University

DMJ_167_11The Department of Mathematics, Duke University, and Duke University Press are pleased to announce that Richard Hain has been appointed managing editor for the Duke Mathematical Journal and that the journal’s editorial office will return to Duke University after more than 20 years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where Jonathan Wahl has served as managing editor. Wahl will continue his involvement with the journal as co-managing editor through June 2019.

“Jonathan Wahl has done a fantastic job growing the journal, and we are excited that he will be handing it off to Dick Hain this year,” said Jonathan Mattingly, Chair of the Department of Mathematics at Duke University. “Hain is a versatile mathematician who brings a broad view of the subject. Having the journal back at Duke will facilitate more exciting collaborations between the department and the journal.”

Hain, Professor of Mathematics at Duke University, has focused his career on the study of the topology of complex algebraic varieties. He has published multiple books and journal articles and has received numerous awards. Hain earned a BS from the University of Sydney in Australia, an MA from the Australian National University, and a PhD from the University of Illinois.

Hain said, “I am looking forward to working with the editors and the staff of Duke University Press to maintain the Duke Mathematical Journal as one of the world’s leading mathematics journals. I would like to thank Jonathan Wahl for his hard work and commitment to the journal over the past 21 years.”

“We are excited for the Duke Mathematical Journal to return to Duke University,” said Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press. “DMJ is one of the leading journals in its field and I appreciate the work that Jonathan Wahl at UNC Chapel Hill did to grow its reputation. We’re looking forward to continuing to work with him in the first year of the journal’s transition back to Duke.”

The Duke Mathematical Journal, published by Duke University Press since its inception in 1935, found its origin within the inner circles of the American mathematical research community and is one of the top mathematics journals in the world. The journal has published work by 10 Abel Prize winners, 24 Fields Medalists, and 25 Wolf Prize winners. Its Impact Factor increased from 2.171 in 2016 to 2.317 in 2017.

Visit the journal’s homepage on Project Euclid to learn more.

Duke Mathematical Journal Editors Win Prestigious Fields and Chern Medals

Alessio_FigalliCongratulations to Alessio Figalli, an editor of Duke Mathematical Journal, who won the 2018 Fields Medal. The Fields Medal is awarded every four years to mathematicians under the age of 40 who show “outstanding mathematical achievement for existing work and for the promise of future achievement.” The winners were announced yesterday at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Figalli was lauded for his contributions to the theory of optimal transport and its applications in partial differential equations, metric geometry, and probability. To learn more about Figalli’s work, read the press release from the International Mathematical Union.

While several editors of Duke Mathematical Journal have won the Fields Medal, including Jean Bourgain and Simon K. Donaldson, this is the first time the award has been presented to a current editor of the journal.

To read his work, browse Figalli’s articles on Project Euclid.


Masaki_KashiwaraWe are also pleased to share that Masaki Kashiwara, also an editor of Duke Mathematical Journal, has won the 2018 Chern Medal. The Chern Medal Award is given to an individual whose accomplishments warrant the highest level of recognition for outstanding achievements in the field of mathematics.

Kashiwara was honored for his “outstanding and foundational contributions to algebraic analysis and representation theory sustained over a period of almost 50 years.” To learn more about Kashiwara’s work, read the press release from the International Mathematical Union.

To read his work, browse Kashiwara’s articles on Project Euclid.

Congratulations to both winners!

Meet Our 2018 Summer Interns!

It is important for us to recognize our student interns and how hard they work. We would also like to hear about what they are learning from the Press and what experiences and impressions they will take with them when they leave. We created this blog post and video featuring our Summer 2018 interns to help capture all of that. Learn more about them with these brief introductions, and see what Duke University Press means to them.


Patrick Thomas Morgan

Born and raised in Watertown, NY, Patrick Morgan is a sixth-year Ph.D. candidate in Duke University’s English department. After having worked for Discover, Earth, and The American Gardener, he was inspired to develop his dissertation, titled “Manifesting Vertical Destiny: Geology, Reform, and the Stratified Earth in American Literature, Long Nineteenth Century.” Morgan has been the editorial assistant of American Literature at Duke University Press since 2014, where he has improved his critical thinking skills and learned how to summarize entire books in only one hundred words. Teaching is Morgan’s passion. After Duke he wants to continue working in education and publishing.

Patrick loves “being a part of a publishing community, working with others to create a quality publication.” 

Curious fact about Patrick:I used to be in a book discussion group with monks who made a vow of silence (Trappists, or Cistercians of the Strict Observance).”


Renee RaginOriginally from Manhattan, NY, Renee Ragin is heading this fall into her fifth year of Duke University’s Graduate Program in Literature (critical theory and philosophy). She is interning with the Acquisitions World Reader team where she has learned the importance of being detail-oriented.

“It is interesting but difficult; I am happy people are taking the time to explain everything,” she said of her work.

Ragin hopes to stay in academia and teach, or continue to work at Duke University Press.

Curious fact about Renee: “I used to be a competitive swimmer. I swam all four years of high school and a few years in college in the intramurals.”


John JerniganSophomore John Jernigan is an economics and statistics undergraduate at Duke University. Jernigan, who is from Durham, NC, interns in Duke University Press’s Journals Production Department, where he has learned the publishing and editing process for journals. Jernigan said this is his first office job and that his coworkers and the professional environment are providing him with a “great learning experience.” 

Once he leaves the Press, he plans to attend graduate school and start his own business.

Curious fact about John: “I’ve had every flavor of Pelican’s SnoBall.” (Pelican’s is a regional chain offering shaved ice.)


Ithiopia LemonsIthiopia Lemons, raised in Durham, NC, is heading into her second year as a graduate student in the Educational Technology Program at North Carolina Central University. At Duke University Press, Lemons is an Internal Communication student worker for the Staff, Operations, and Support team. Her ultimate goal is to become an entrepreneur and build on her natural body products business, which she is hoping to expand in the future. While working at the Press, she has gained office experience and improved her leadership skills.

Curious fact about Ithiopia: “My favorite fruit is cantaloupe.”


Blake Beaver.pngKansas native Blake Beaver is a Ph.D. student in the Graduate Program in Literature at Duke University. He is interning with the Books Marketing Department here at the Press. “It has been really positive. Everyone has been really friendly—busy, but good. I feel it is important to have an understanding of how people actually market their books, how you create your sales strategy, what is a realistic sales goal for a book, and to understand the particularities of the trade books versus the more academic books.” Blake wants to have a tenure-track position as a professor.

Curious fact about Blake: “I grew up riding horses and raised bucket calves.”


Erika Ianovale.PNGBorn in Milan, Italy and raised in São Paulo, Brazil, Erika Ianovale is a rising senior studying mass communication with a concentration in public relations and a minor in Spanish at North Carolina Central University. She is currently interning with the Journals Marketing team. “I have learned a lot. My supervisors and the team are very supportive and master what they do. Once I leave the Press I want to be able to learn as many things as they teach me, but mainly how to deal with the international market.”

She would love to further her publishing knowledge at DUP or do public relations work for a multinational company in New York City, California, or Florida.

Curious fact about Erika: “I speak four languages (Portuguese, Italian, English, and Spanish).”


Zachary Farmer.jpg

Junior Zachary Farmer is studying sports management at Winston-Salem State University. He is currently interning at the front desk. “It has been smooth and relaxed. When I’m done here, I want to further my communication skills.” Zachary wants to work with a professional sports team and possibly become a general manager.

Curious fact about Zachary: “I’m allergic to nuts.”

 


Bethany White.pngOriginally from Gaithersburg, MD, fifth-year senior Bethany White is a mass communication major with a concentration in broadcast media and a minor in writing/English at North Carolina Central University. White interns on Duke University Press’s Communications team, where she has learned new tools with Excel and has worked on developing her communication skills. “It’s very laid-back, but we still get our work done,” she said.

After her internship at the Press, she wants to work for a public affairs or media relations branch within the government.

Curious fact about Bethany: “I really enjoy listening to rock music.”


Anastasia Karklina.JPG

Originally from Latvia, Anastasia Karklina, is a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in Duke University’s Graduate Program in Literature, and her specialization is cultural theory and critical race studies. Karklina has worked for three semesters in the Books Marketing Department, where she has been mostly assisting with awards. She has also improved her design and administrative skills.

Curious fact about Anastasia: I am known by my friends as an activist, and I do social justice work in the community.”


Ashley Lee.jpegWilmington, NC, native Ashley Lee is a graduate student currently studying creative writing, specifically nonfiction, at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. She is interning with the Books Editorial team. “It’s going well; I’ve learned a lot. After I leave the Press I want to get a stronger understanding of what the relationship looks like between editors, editorial styles, and authors, and what long-term collaboration looks like.” She would love to continue working in academic publishing, or write for television and/or film.

Curious fact about Ashley: “I enjoy photography when I can.”


Kim Reisler.JPGKimberly Reisler, a graduate student from the Bay Area in California, is studying for her master’s in library science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is currently interning with the Digital Strategies Department. “It’s been really good. It’s fun to learn about how everything works together to create finished products. When I leave I want to have a better understanding of how to integrate different technologies, how they work together, and how technology supports the work that people do.” Kimberly wants to do something that relates to information systems and library technology.

Curious fact about Kimberly: “I love hamsters.”


Nora Nunn.JPGGraduate student Nora Nunn is from Atlanta, GA, and is pursuing her Ph.D. in English at Duke University. Her research focuses on genocide in the twentieth century in the American imagination. She is currently interning with American Literature. “It has been great. I think I’ve been the editorial assistant for American Literature for a couple of years and it’s a great way to share intellectual work through the journal. I hope to learn more ways to engage with the public and digital humanities.” Nora is open to various possibilities. She wants to do something related to education and intellectual conversation, whether it’s teaching or researching.

Curious fact about Nora: “I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Rwanda.”


Anna Tybinko.JPGAnna Tybinko, an ABD student from Philadelphia, PA, is studying for her Ph.D. at Duke University in Romance Studies. She was a World Reader intern in Books Editing, working primarily on the Brazil and Haiti readers. “My experience with the Press was wonderful. I felt like I really got to know the publishing process intimately. I’m also much more versed in questions of intellectual property now. I can imagine all of this being important insight if I get the opportunity to publish my own research.” She hopes to become a professor.

Curious fact about Anna: “Besides Spanish and Portuguese, I also know some Papiamentu (a creole language spoken in the Netherlands Antilles) and Kriolu (a creole language spoken in Cabo Verde).”

Duke University Press Sponsors ACRL awards for librarians working in Women’s and Gender Studies

acrl_1Duke University Press is pleased to announce its sponsorship of two achievement awards through the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS). The Significant Achievement Award and the Career Achievement Award will be presented at the 2018 American Library Association (ALA) annual meeting this week.

Significant Achievement Award

Shirley Lew, dean of library, teaching, and learning services at Vancouver Community College and Baharak Yousefi, head of library communications at Simon Fraser University, are the winners of the 2018 ACRL WGSS Award for Significant Achievement in Women and Gender Studies Librarianship.

This award, honoring a significant or one-time contribution to women and gender studies librarianship, was presented to Lew and Yousefi for their book, Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership. Feminists Among Us makes explicit the ways in which a grounding in feminist theory and practice impacts the work of library administrators who identify as feminists. Award chair Dolores Fidishun lauds the book as “a seminal review of the intersection of feminism, power, and leadership in our profession.”

Career Achievement Award

Diedre Conkling, director of the Lincoln County Library District, is the winner of the 2018 ACRL WGSS Award for Career Achievement.

This award, honoring significant long-standing contributions to women and gender studies in the field of librarianship over the course of a career, was presented to Conkling for her work as a longtime member of the WGSS, Feminist Task force, the Committee on the Status of Women in Librarianship, and the Library Leadership and Management Association Women’s Administrator’s Discussion Group.

“Conkling has continuously brought women’s issues to the forefront of our organization,” Fidishun states, “and has served as an inspiration and mentor to many of us in the association. Through her activism she has demonstrated the power of women’s voices in ALA and in the world, always asking the important questions and looking for ways to move women’s agendas forward in ALA.”

Congratulations to all winners!

About ACRL

The Association of College and Research Libraries is the higher education association for librarians. Representing nearly 10,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products, and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community.

About Duke University Press’s commitment to emerging fields

Duke University Press is committed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge and contributing boldly to the international community of scholarship, promoting a sincere spirit of tolerance and a commitment to learning, freedom, and truth. An early establisher of scholarship in queer theory, gender studies, and sexuality studies, Duke University Press is dedicated to supporting others who contribute to these fields.

2019 Pricing Now Available

dup_pr_filled_k_pngDuke University Press 2019 pricing for single-issue journal titles, the e-Duke Journals collections, the e-Duke Books collections, Euclid Prime, and MSP on Euclid is now available online at dukeupress.edu/Libraries.

New titles join the 2019 journals list

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the addition of Prism: Theory and Modern Chinese Literature (formerly the Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese), the Illinois Journal of Mathematics, and archival content for Black Sacred Music: A Journal of Theomusicology to its journals list.

Prism, a biannual journal, publishes works that study the shaping influence of traditional literature and culture on modern and contemporary China. The journal will be included in the e-Duke Journals: Expanded collection.

The Illinois Journal of Mathematics, a quarterly, was founded as a preeminent journal of mathematics and  publishes high-quality research papers in all areas of mainstream mathematics. The journal will be hosted on Project Euclid and included in Euclid Prime.

Archival content (Volumes 1-9, 1987 to 1995) for Black Sacred Music: A Journal of Theomusicology, previously published by Duke University Press, will be available in 2019 to subscribers of the e-Duke Journals collections.

New e-book subject collections

Duke University Press is now offering libraries new e-book collections: Religious Studies and Music and Sound Studies. Both collections are hosted on read.dukeupress.edu.

The Religious Studies e-book collection includes approximately 120 titles that examine religions around the world, conflicts within and among religions, and the cultural, social, and political dynamics of religion. The Music and Sound Studies e-book collection includes approximately 135 titles in African studies, African American studies, American studies, anthropology, Asian studies, gender studies, history, Latin American studies, media studies, sociology, and many other fields.

These new offerings join our existing e-book subject collections in Gender Studies and Latin American Studies.

Tikkun ceases publication

The quarterly journal Tikkun will cease publication with volume 33, issue 4, at the decision of its owner, the Institute for Labor and Mental Health. Institutions that previously purchased the journal will continue to receive perpetual access through Duke University Press. Archival content for Tikkun will also continue to be hosted on the Project MUSE platform.

Direct subscriptions now available for two mathematics titles

Institutional direct subscriptions are now available for Annals of Functional Analysis and Banach Journal of Mathematical Analysis. The journals were formerly available solely through the Euclid Prime collection.

Change in frequency for History of Political Economy

In 2019, History of Political Economy will increase in frequency from four to five issues per year, in addition to publishing an annual supplement.

For more information about 2019 pricing, please contact libraryrelations@dukeupress.edu.

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Now Available: First Issue of Journal of Korean Studies Published by Duke University Press

ddjks_23_1We are pleased to announce that the first issue of the Journal of Korean Studies fully published by Duke University Press, volume 23, issue 1, is now available.

The Journal of Korean Studies is the preeminent journal in its field, publishing high-quality articles in all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences on a broad range of Korea-related topics, both historical and contemporary. Korean studies is a dynamic field, with student enrollments and tenure-track positions growing throughout North America and abroad. At the same time, the Korean peninsula’s increasing importance in the world has sparked interest in Korea well beyond those whose academic work focuses on the region. Recent topics include the history of anthropology of Korea; seventeenth century Korean love stories; the Chinese diaspora in North Korea; student activism in colonial Korea in the 1940s; and GLBTQ life in contemporary South Korea. Contributors include scholars conducting transnational work on the Asia-Pacific as well as on relevant topics throughout the global Korean diaspora. The Journal of Korean Studies is based at the Center for Korean Research at Columbia University.

Browse the table of contents to the issue.

Hispanic American Historical Review Commemorates 100th Anniversary

ddhahr_98_2_coverHispanic American Historical Review (HAHR) observes its 100th anniversary in 2018 and has marked the occasion with a celebratory video highlighting the history and the future of the journal.

HAHR pioneered the study of Latin American history and culture in the United States and remains a widely respected journal in the field. Today, the journal publishes rigorous scholarship on every facet of Latin American history and culture across thematic, chronological, regional, and methodological specializations.

“It has become the flagship journal of the field, and I think that’s one of the reasons why the field of Latin American history is so much more dynamic than many others,” former HAHR coeditor Jocelyn Olcott states.

Founded in 1918 by University of California professor Charles E. Chapman and University of Illinois professor William S. Robertson, the journal’s first issue featured a letter from sitting President Woodrow Wilson. “I learn with a great deal of interest of the plans for an Ibero-American Historical Review and beg that you will express to all those interested my very sincere approval of the project,” Wilson wrote. “It is a most interesting one and ought to lead to very important results both for scholarship and for the increase of cordial feelings throughout the Americas.”

ddhahr_96_4Hispanic American Historical Review is the oldest journal that focuses on Latin America as a whole in the history field. It was one of the earliest journals dealing with any type of history other than United States history. It really is a pioneer. It has been the major point of reference for people in the field,” said former HAHR coeditor John D. French.

The journal fell into financial crisis in 1922 and ceased publication for four years, when Duke University Press offered a subsidy to support the journal. With publishing and institutional support, the journal has continued publication with Duke University Press since 1926.

HAHR has published over 400 issues and periodically publishes special features, such as forums and special issues. Topics include environmental history, science and medicine, drug history, reproduction, and slavery and race. Online content can be found at read.dukeupress.edu/hahr. The journal also features online resources at hahr-online.com and @HAHR21 on Twitter and @HispanicAmericanHistoricalReview on Facebook.

Since 2017, the HAHR editorial office is based at Pennsylvania State University under the direction of editors Martha Few, Zachary Morgan, Matthew Restall, and Amara Solari, and managing editor Sean Mannion.

“Though we have a long history, this is not a traditional or staid journal and we hope that we’ll have exciting, progressive, and participatory research coming out of the five years that it’s in our hands,” said current coeditor Zachary Morgan.

Commemorate the 100th anniversary of the journal with the video, “Celebrating 100 Years of the Hispanic American Historical Review.”

Now Available: First Issue of English Language Notes Published by Duke University Press

ELN_561-cov_early_for-JmktWe are pleased to announce that the first issue of English Language Notes published by Duke University Press, volume 56, issue 1, “Critical and Comparative Mysticisms,” is now available.

A respected forum of criticism and scholarship in literary and cultural studies since 1962, English Language Notes (ELN) is dedicated to pushing the boundaries of scholarship in literature and related fields in new directions. Broadening its reach geographically and transhistorically, ELN opens new lines of inquiry and widens emerging fields. Each ELN issue advances topics of current scholarly concern, providing theoretical speculation as well as ptractical interdisciplinary recalibrations. Offering semiannual, topically themed issues, ELN also includes “Of Note,” an ongoing section featuring related topics, review essays or roundtables of cutting-edge scholarship, and emergent concerns. ELN is a wide-ranging journal that combines theoretical rigor with innovative interdisciplinary collaboration.

“Critical and Comparative Mysticisms” contains essays on mysticisms through a critical lens. This rarely, if ever, articulated vision of mysticisms juxtaposes them with other disciplinary and epistemological avenues of critical thought, such as historical, political, and literary studies. Mystical traditions, which often lie at the margins of institutionalized religions, tend to break down the boundaries that develop within religious contexts over time and offer syncretic alternatives to them. Mysticisms also offer alternative versions of knowledge seeking, being, and experience that contribute to a distinct and compelling branch of contemporary critical theory, intervening in current ideologically loaded discourses of religion and drawing on the vast archive of mystical thought, writing, and art from around the world in all periods. This special issue also contains a roundtable section with brief interventions concerning various angles of mysticism.

Read the introduction, made freely available, and browse the table of contents.

An Interview with Jessica Loudis, editor of World Policy Journal

Jessica Loudis recently became editor of World Policy Journal (WPJ), the flagship publication of the World Policy Institute. We sat down with her to discuss the new editorship, the direction of the journal, and upcoming issue themes.

m_ddwpj_35_1_coverWhat are your plans for the journal during your tenure as editor?
I want to cover policy in unexpected ways, and to draw in readers who don’t yet know they’re interested in the subject. Part of this involves taking a more multidisciplinary approach. For instance, our current issue has a piece about Dubai’s efforts to send a manned mission to Mars, and another about how Britain’s public space laws were shaped by music festivals in the 80s and 90s. Basically, WPJ will be the place to read the kinds of pieces you wouldn’t initially expect to find in a policy magazine.

How do you see the journal developing in the next few years?
I’m interested in discovering new, talented writers from all over the world, and in giving them the opportunity to tell stories that wouldn’t work for other magazines. We want to cultivate a sensibility that is incisive, offbeat, and multidisciplinary, and to do so by putting journalists and scholars and thinkers in conversation with one another. Ultimately, I want to create an intellectual community around the magazine, and to start meaningful conversations that have a broader impact.

How have you selected issue topics for the journal?
I’m interested in topics that are open-ended and allow for different avenues of access. For instance, the theme of our summer issue is “Megalomania,” and it will include a piece on a rising female fascist politician in Italy, another on a failed attempt to abolish time zones, and one on former London Mayor Boris Johnson’s overambitious architectural initiatives. I like topics that can speak to people in different ways, and which allow for a bit of fun.

WPJ34_4_cover

Oh, on a related note, we’ve also brought on a cocktail historian, Eben Klemm, to create original cocktails based on our themes. For “Megalomania,” Eben has designed a cocktail that is a combination of Mussolini and Saddam Hussein’s favorite drinks, with an Idi Amin flourish thrown in for good measure.

Are there certain topics or fields you’re interested in focusing on?
I come from a literary background, and I’m very interested in having people from literature and the arts think about policy and politics in new ways. I’m also interested in anthropology and sociology, and I’ve really enjoyed working with specialists in those fields. In general, I want to surprise readers by drawing connections they hadn’t previously considered.

Can you tell us more about upcoming issues?
Our upcoming issues are “Megalomania,” “The Limits of Big Data,” and “Tourism.”

I already told you a little about megalomania, and for “The Limits of Big Data,” we have a piece I’m excited about on facial recognition software and programmable empathy. Another piece I’m looking forward to is  on the Vatican’s big data initiative. As for the rest, you’ll have to wait and see…

For the tourism issue, we’re looking at a lot of different kinds of tourism: medical, adoption, dental, retail, to name a few.

WPJ34_3One of the interesting things about the journal is its work recruiting journalists from around the world, can you shed more light on how you find new voices and stories?
I was fortunate to work at Al Jazeera and Bookforum before WPJ, which allowed me to cultivate an international network of writers and critics. Beyond that, I just read constantly, and try to do so as widely as possible. I follow the book publishing catalogs (especially Duke’s, which is consistently excellent), I read magazines, I pay attention to what’s happening in journalism, and I do a bit of Twitter stalking to see who the people I respect are reading and talking to. Finally, I’ll often ask colleagues or friends in my field for recommendations or advice on particular topics.

Tell us more about any other World Policy programs you’d like us to know about.
World Policy Journal and World Policy Institute are about to launch a very cool new program called “Renegotiating the Social Contract.” There will be a few parts to this, including conferences, publications, and multimedia projects. The idea is that the classic social contract as we’ve known it has broken down, and in a lot of ways, changed. While keeping in mind how the social contract used to be structured between citizens and the government, we’re looking how it’s currently structured, and what’s been lost or gained.