Press News

Director Steve Cohn Retires

Steve Cohn (2)Steve Cohn, director of Duke University Press for twenty-five years, retires at the end of this week. He told the Duke Chronicle, “It has been a wild ride—sometimes wonderfully challenging, sometimes challenging to the point where I had no idea how we’d make it through—but in the end a very successful one.” To honor Steve, we offer some tributes from people who have worked with him over the years.

“I knew at the time when the provost asked me to take up a leadership position at the press that Steve was fully in support of that action, even though he obviously had credentials infinitely superior to mine. Later I understood that Steve was acting in character; that is, he was being generous and professional and putting what he saw as the needs of the press ahead of his own ambitions. Steve has always been a ‘company man,’ someone whose loyalty and devotion to the enterprise was obvious at every moment. I cherish my own tenure at the Press and attribute the success that we had in those years to Steve’s extraordinary dedication. And he also put up with me.” —Stanley Fish, Davidson-Kahn Distinguished University Professor of Humanities and Law at Florida International University and former Director of Duke University Press

“My first job at DUP was as the first assistant Steve Cohn had ever had. While I think I taught him some things about how to be assisted, he taught me a great deal more, through the example of his leadership: how to act with integrity; how to disagree strongly without making enemies; how to listen to and consider differing perspectives; how to communicate clearly and directly; and so much more. Steve’s leadership has shaped the strong organization we have become.”—Patty Chase, Steve’s former assistant and current Digital Content Manager

“Thank you for being kind, patient, and enthusiastic about the topic at hand (no matter what it was).”—Maria Volpe, Steve’s current assistant

“I’ve worked with Steve for more than twenty years and throughout that time I’ve always been impressed by his integrity, his devotion to our mission, his accessibility to his staff, and his commitment to being transparent in his decision-making. Sometimes that means we get more information than we actually want! Personally, I’ll miss Steve’s subtle sense of humor, his kind advice about parenting, and his deep historical knowledge of the Press and of Durham.”—Laura Sell, Publicity and Advertising Manager

“Steve Cohn’s thoughtful stewardship of the Press, his commitment to having all staff participate in the strategic planning process, and his zeal not only for our mission but for the publishing industry in general have made him an exceptional leader. I’ve enjoyed hearing stories about the extraordinary lengths Steve went to to recruit people to the Press in its less-robust days (including loaning one of them his caravan), and I am grateful for the work he put into making the Press what it is today.”—Jocelyn Dawson, Journals Marketing Manager

“With smarts, integrity, and humor of an infectiously subtle kind, Steve has stewarded DUP to the cutting-edge prominence it holds today as kick-ass academic press #1. Steadfast in vision, bold in execution, with the chops to be daring, Steve has been an exemplary director. His legacy will linger for a very long time. But his presence will be sorely missed. Thank you Steve for making the press, and involvement with it, such a richly intellectual engagement.”—Anne Allison, Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University and member of the Press’s Editorial Advisory Board

“The press has benefited greatly from Steve’s publishing entrepreneurial vision and we’ve come a long way in his many years as director. I’ve really enjoyed working for him these past nine years. I have truly appreciated his support of our working environment of creative collaboration that drives and enables DUP successes. I wish him lots of lazy days of biking, reading, kayaking, and traveling in his retirement.”—Nancy Hoagland, Director of Editing, Design, and Production

“Steve Cohn leaves an amazing legacy at Duke University Press. He has shaped the Press with his independent and innovative ideas and through setting ambitious, long term goals. His entrepreneurial approach has challenged the organization to innovate and to embrace change, such as being one of the first UPs to establish and successfully sell our own electronic journals and books collections. He has successfully led the Press through huge changes in the scholarly publishing industry and fluctuations in the US marketplace while continuing to grow the Press so that it is set up to thrive in the future. Many thanks, Steve, for all of your hard work and dedication. “—Cason Lynley, Director of Marketing and Sales

“Whenever I’ve needed help, Steve has been available with an amazing and immediate command of detail, the right questions, and ideas that have taught me time and again how to balance pragmatism and our mission. I’ve always left the room with a solid plan and a lighter mind. Thank you for everything, and congratulations, Steve!”—Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services, Project Euclid

“I’ll always be grateful for Steve’s vision, creativity, and tenacity, In 2010, he envisioned Duke University Press as a digital publisher of distinction, and set us a goal of selecting, producing, marketing, and selling our digital publications with as much expertise and finesse as we did our print books and journals. To drive us forward in this area, Steve tapped me to lead our digital publishing strategy, and in doing so, provided me with a tremendous opportunity to contribute meaningfully to the Press and to scholarly publishing more generally. I am the publishing professional I am today due in large part because Steve shared generously his vast store of publishing knowledge and insight. For this and so much more, thank you, Steve.”—Allison Belan, Associate Director, Digital Strategy & Systems

“Steve envisioned what the Press could become and was the brilliant planner able to bring it into being. Each time the publishing environment changed for books or for journals, he was looking ahead to see what we needed to do in order to flourish five and ten years out. His guidance and leadership will be long remembered. He never told us what to publish, but always made it better.”—Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director

In his retirement, Steve plans to devote more time to the Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association, of which he is president. All of us at the Press will miss him and wish him the best in all his future endeavors. We are welcoming our new director, Dean Smith, on June 25.

Duke University Press Joins the NC LIVE HomeGrown Collection

Duke University Press and NC LIVE have partnered to add thirty of the Press’s e-books to the NC LIVE HomeGrown Collection, making them freely available to more than 200 libraries across the state with unlimited, simultaneous use: no holds, checkout limits, or waitlists.

Titles include bestsellers such as Living a Feminist Life, Vinyl Freak, Exile and Pride, and Spill, among others. The list also features several books in the World Readers and Latin America Readers series, such as The South Africa Reader, The Dominican Republic Reader, and The Chile Reader.

Subject areas include African American studies, Latin American studies, cultural studies, gender studies, art history and criticism, American studies, music, and poetry. All titles are currently accessible online through NC LIVE or via local NC library catalogs.

“Having our content be broadly available and easily accessible has always been a main focus of Duke University Press’s mission. We are thrilled to partner with NC LIVE to share our books with the people of North Carolina and can’t wait to hear how folks use them in their book clubs and classrooms,” said Kim Steinle, Library Relations and Sales Manager at Duke University Press.

“NC LIVE’s HomeGrown e-book collection grows every year thanks to the generous donations of North Carolina’s libraries,” said Rob Ross, Executive Director of NC LIVE. “This year we are particularly excited to add e-books from a distinguished publisher partner in Duke University Press.”

NC LIVE is a statewide cooperative of 205 libraries that provides access to online articles, e-books, streaming videos, and digital newspapers. This content is freely available to all NC residents through their local library. The HomeGrown Collection contains more than 3,600 e-books from a variety of local publishers.

Duke University Press is a nonprofit scholarly publisher best known for publishing in the humanities, social sciences, and mathematics. The Press publishes approximately 140 books annually and over 50 journals, as well as offering several electronic collections and open-access publishing initiatives.

Illinois Journal of Mathematics Now Available

We are pleased to announce the publication of Illinois Journal of Mathematics (IJM) volume 63, issue 1, the first issue of IJM published by Duke University Press. Browse the issue’s contents on Project Euclid.

Founded in 1957, IJM featured in its inaugural volume the papers of many of the world’s leading mathematicians. Since then, IJM has published many influential papers, including the proof of the Four Color Conjecture, and continues to publish original research articles in all areas of mathematics. The journal is sponsored by the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The editorial board comprises a mix of preeminent mathematicians from within its host department and across the mathematical research establishment.

“We are proud to be associated with the outstanding Duke University Press mathematics publishing program and its flagship journal, the Duke Mathematical Journal,” said Steven Bradlow, Editor-in-Chief of IJM.

“We look forward to providing our expert mathematics publishing support to the editors as they and we work together to ensure that IJM continues to be a valuable resource to the entire mathematics research community,” said Rob Dilworth, Journals Director at Duke University Press.

Individual print-and-online subscriptions to IJM are available, or ask your librarian to subscribe.

Save 40% During our Spring Sale

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It’s time to stock up on summer reading. Head to our website and save 40% on all in-stock books and journal issues by entering coupon code SPRING40.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. And you can’t combine multiple orders to maximize the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final. If you have additional questions, check out our FAQs.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (Monday-Friday, 8-5 Eastern Time).

The sale ends Tuesday, May 28 at 11:59 Eastern Time. Start shopping now!

Congratulations to our 2019 AUPresses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show Honorees

The selections for the 2019 AUPresses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show have been announced and as usual, our talented designers have been honored.

In the scholarly typographic category, Heather Hensley and Julienne Alexander have been selected for their design of Laughing at the Devil by Amy Laura Hall.

 

Amy Ruth Buchanan was also honored in the scholarly typographic category for her unified design of Fred Moten’s trilogy consent not to be a single being, which includes Black and Blur, Stolen Life, and The Universal Machine.

This year’s jury was Matt Avery, Nicole Caputo, Sara T. Sauers, and Na Kim. Congratulations to our honorees and thanks to all our designers for creating such beautiful books.

Dean Smith to be Next Director of Duke University Press

Dean SmithDean Smith, the director of Cornell University Press, will be the new director of Duke University Press, school officials announced Thursday.

Smith succeeds Steve Cohn, who is retiring at the end of June. Cohn has been at Duke University Press since 1984, and has served as director since 1993. Smith will start his new job on July 1.

“The Duke University Press is one of Duke’s great assets. It is a world-renowned press with a stellar reputation,” said Duke Provost Sally Kornbluth. “With his business acumen, deep knowledge of the publishing world, interest in new technologies and wide-ranging intellectual interests, Dean will be a wonderful new leader for the press.”

Kornbluth also thanked Cohn for his quarter-century of leadership at Duke Press. “Steve has built the press into a national powerhouse that’s held in high esteem throughout the academic world,” Kornbluth said. “Steve has worked tirelessly to ensure the highest possible standards for the press.”

Each year Duke University Press publishes about 140 new books, almost 60 journals and multiple digital collections that share the ideas of progressive thinkers and support emerging and vital fields of scholarship across the humanities and interpretive social sciences. It is also well known for its mathematics journals, sophisticated graphic design and integration of technology platforms. The press, located in Durham’s Brightleaf Square, was founded in 1921.

“I am honored and thrilled to be selected as director of Duke University Press,” Smith said. “I look forward to working with my colleagues at the press and across the university to publish high-quality scholarship and advance the frontiers of knowledge in new and exciting ways.”

Since Smith became director of Cornell University Press in 2015, the press has expanded its title output from 100 to 150 titles per year, increased its digital publishing footprint from 350 to more than 3,000 eBooks, and published 150 open access texts on the Cornell Open website.

During his 30-year publishing career, Smith has helped lead all aspects of the transition from print-based publications to more easily accessible web-based digital editions; this includes a key role in reimagining Project Muse, a pivotal digital platform for humanities scholarship, to include eBooks and journals together. He has a wealth of experience in book and journal acquisitions, digital platform development, financial management, global business development and strategic planning, and held such roles as journal publisher, director of electronic publishing, vice president of sales and marketing as well as press director.

“Duke University Press has developed incredible talent throughout the organization and has cultivated strong relationships with many Duke faculty,” noted Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies Ed Balleisen. “Dean Smith has the background and creativity to build on the press’s many strengths, whether by deepening partnerships across campus, furthering our goals for diversity and inclusion, or successfully navigating the rapidly evolving terrain of academic publishing.”

Smith is the author of American Boy, a book that won the 2000 Washington Writer’s Prize and the Maryland Prize for Literature in 2001. He is also a contributor of poetry to such publications as Poetry East, Open City, The Virginia Literary Review, Gulf Stream and the anthology D.C. Poets Against the War.

Though no relation to the late legendary UNC basketball coach of the same name, Smith is an avid sports fan who has previously worked as a sportswriter and freelance journalist; in 2013, Temple University Press published his book about the NFL’s Baltimore Ravens, Never Easy, Never Pretty: A Fan, A City, A Championship Season.

Happy 150th Birthday to Durham!

durham150_cobrand_example_3-300x3002019 marks the sesquicentennial of Durham, North Carolina, which Duke University Press calls home. We’re excited to celebrate along with Durham by showcasing some of our local history titles.

978-0-8223-4983-9_pr.jpgWe’re especially proud to publish the definitive history of Durham, Durham County by Jean Bradley Anderson. Revised and expanded in 2011, it is a sweeping history of Durham from the seventeenth century to the end of the twentieth. Moving beyond traditional local histories, which tend to focus on powerful families, Anderson integrates the stories of well-known figures with those of ordinary men and women, blacks and whites, to create a complex and fascinating portrait of Durham’s economic, political, social, and labor history. Drawing on extensive primary research, she examines the origins of the town of Durham and recounts the growth of communities around mills, stores, taverns, and churches in the century before the rise of tobacco manufacturing. She writes about the coming of the railroad; the connection between the Civil War and the rise of the tobacco industry; the Confederate surrender at Bennett Place; the relocation of Trinity College to Durham and, later, its renaming as Duke University; and the growth of health-service and high-technology industries in the decades after the development of Research Triangle Park.

Lending PowerIn Lending Power, Howard E. Covington Jr. examines the history of a Durham institution, the Self-Help Credit Union. First established to assist workers displaced by closed furniture and textile mills, Self-Help created a credit union that expanded into providing home loans for those on the margins of the financial market, especially people of color and single mothers. Using its own lending record, Self-Help convinced commercial banks to follow suit, extending its influence well beyond North Carolina. In 1999 its efforts led to the first state law against predatory lending. A decade later, as the Great Recession ravaged the nation’s economy, its legislative victories helped influence the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and the formation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Covington is also the author of Terry Sanford: Politics, Progress, and Outrageous Ambitions. Sanford was a U.S. Senator, Governor of North Carolina, and then President of Duke University.

978-0-8223-0743-3_prThe Dukes of Durham, 1865-1929 by Robert F. Durden looks at the history of several towering Durham figures: industrialist and philanthropist Washington Duke and two of his sons, Benjamin Newton Duke and James Buchanan Duke. Lasting Legacy to the Carolinas, also by Durden, tells about the James B. Duke’s founding of the Duke Endowment, which funded Trinity College in Durham and led it to change its name to Duke University in 1924. Robert F. Durden was an important Durham figure in his own right; when he died in 2016, Duke lowered their flags to half-mast in honor of his contributions chronicling the history of the university and the region.

To celebrate Durham’s birthday, we are offering all these titles for 50% off throughout 2019. Use the coupon code DURHAM when ordering from our site.

Learn more about Durham’s history and all the celebrations this year at the Durham 150 site. Visit the Museum of Durham History for special exhibitions all year. And check out Preservation Durham for fascinating pictures of historic locations around the city as well as schedules for their great walking tours. Happy Birthday, Durham!

 

 

Final Day of Our E-Book Sale

 

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Today is the final day of our e-book sale. Through today all e-books on our content site are only $4.99. Tomorrow they will cost the same as the paperback price (usually between $25 and $30).

Hurry over to the site now and purchase as many e-books as you’d like at this special price! Please revisit our announcement of the sale for purchase instructions, or see our FAQs.

If you have problems or questions about your order, please contact our customer service team at orders@dukeupress.edu or 919-688-5134.

25% Off to Celebrate 25 Years of GLQ

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Join us in celebrating the 25th anniversary of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies by taking advantage of a special discount on subscriptions and memberships!

Through the end of January, use coupon code GLQ25 to take 25% off an individual subscription to GLQ or an individual membership in the GL/Q Caucus for the Modern Languages. A Caucus membership includes a one-year subscription to GLQ. Subscribers and members receive print copies of the current volume and online access to the journal’s full archive.

Subscribe now or join the GL/Q Caucus.

glq_25_1_coverWhen you subscribe, you’ll receive the first issue of the current volume, “GLQ at 25,” which commemorates the journal’s impact on the field of queer theory. Contributors reconsider key works from the journal that have resonated in their moment and beyond. The issue includes an extensive forum with thirty-five contributions, including a special section on Cathy Cohen’s landmark 1997 article “Punks, Bulldaggers, and Welfare Queens” and revisitings of works by scholars such as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Susan Stryker, and José Esteban Muñoz. Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.

2019 Modern Language Association Highlights and Awards

This year’s meeting of the Modern Language Association was absolutely packed with awards, receptions, and events—and, like always, we had a wonderful time meeting authors, editors, and attendees and selling our books and journals.

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Congratulations to Melanie Yergeau, whose book Authoring Autism won the MLA Prize for a First Book, and Fred Moten, whose book Black and Blur won the William Sanders Scarborough Prize!

Several of our journals and books also received awards from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) and from the GL/Q Caucus for the Modern Languages:

CELJ Awards

Archives of Asian Art, the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and American Literature each received a CELJ award this year—congratulations to these journals!

coverimageThis year’s Best Journal Design Award was given to Archives of Asian Art. Upon joining Duke University Press in 2017, the journal was redesigned by Sue Hall, our now-retired journals designer of 23 years. The 2018 Association of University Presses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show also recognized the journal’s redesign: “The new design stands out because of the luxurious and well-placed illustrations and because it combines an elegant, versatile page design with fine-grained typographic sophistication,” wrote eminent typographer Robert Bringhurst.

The CELJ also recognized two of our journal issues with the Best Special Issue Award: “Queer about Comics,” an issue of American Literature (volume 90, issue 2) edited by Darieck Scott and Ramzi Fawaz; and “The Bible and English Readers,” an issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (volume 47, issue 3) edited by Thomas Fulton.

GL/Q Caucus Celebration and Awards

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Marcia Ochoa and Jennifer DeVere Brody with the 25th-anniversary issue of GLQ

This year, the GL/Q Caucus celebrated the 25th anniversary of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies with a panel on the journal and a reception. The caucus also awarded prizes to several outstanding books and journal articles:

The Crompton-Noll Award was given to Mary Zaborskis for the article “Sexual Orphanings,” published in GLQ (volume 22, issue 4), and Margaret Galvan for the article “‘The Lesbian Norman Rockwell’: Alison Bechdel and Queer Grassroots Networks,” published in American Literature (volume 90, issue 2).

The Alan Bray Book Award was granted to Jasbir Puar, author of The Right to Maim, and Ariane Cruz, author of The Color of Kink (NYU Press). Kadji Amin, author of Disturbing Attachments, received honorable mention, as did Tourmaline, Eric A. Stanley, and Johanna Burton, editors of Trap Door (New Museum and MIT Press).

Eric A. Stanley and Andrew Spieldenner received the Michael Lynch Award for Service, which, in Eve Sedgwick’s words, serves “to publicize and celebrate—and as widely as possible—the range, the forms, the energy, and the history of queer activism by academics.”

Other Highlights

We enjoyed celebrating several new journals with a wine reception Friday afternoon: Critical TimesEnglish Language Notes, Journal of Korean StudiesMeridiansPrism, and Qui Parle.

It was also wonderful to see several of our authors who stopped by the booth:

Thank you to all who came by to see us! For those of you who weren’t able to make it out to MLA, or who didn’t have enough room in your suitcase to pack all the books you wanted, don’t worry—you can still take advantage of the conference discount by using coupon code MLA19 at dukeupress.edu through the end of February.