Press News

Remembering Craufurd Goodwin

goodwin-cropped.jpgWe are saddened to learn that Craufurd Goodwin, James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Economics and the founding editor of History of Political Economy, passed away last week.

He is remembered at Duke University Press for being an incredibly vibrant and larger-than-life person. Goodwin’s editorial term for the journal lasted from 1969 through 2010 and he was a great publishing partner with the Press for many years.

From Duke Today:

“Craufurd was one of a small group of people who started the field of the history of economic thought,” said Paul Dudenhefer, assistant director of the Duke EcoTeach writing program who worked with Goodwin for more than 15 years. “It used to be done as part of economics in general. Through the founding of the journal, he helped make it its own subfield. He institutionalized the subfield of the history of economics.”

Among colleagues, Goodwin made the environment interesting. Dudenhefer said Goodwin “was always eager to talk about the fascinating things he was reading and writing about. Working with him was extremely educational and entertaining. He made me laugh every day.”

A past president and distinguished fellow of the History of Economics Society, Goodwin was instrumental in the construction of the professional community of historians of economics.

Our sincerest condolences go out to Craufurd Goodwin’s family, friends, and colleagues, as well as the Duke community.

Now Available: First Issue of Archives of Asian Art published by Duke University Press

ddaaa_67_1We are pleased to announce the first issue of Archives of Asian Art published by Duke University Press, volume 67, issue 1, is now available at asianart.dukejournals.org.

Archives of Asian Art, edited by Stanley K. Abe, is devoted to publishing new scholarship on the art and architecture of South, Southeast, Central, and East Asia. Articles discuss premodern and contemporary visual arts, archaeology, architecture, and the history of collecting. Submissions are encouraged in all areas of study related to Asian art and architecture to maintain a balanced representation of regions and types of art, and to present a variety of scholarly perspectives. Every issue is fully illustrated (with color plates in the online version), and each fall issue includes an illustrated compendium of recent acquisitions of Asian art by leading museums and collections.

Browse the table-of-contents for the current issue and read back content from 2001 to the present.

Open Access at Duke University Press: Blog Series Highlights

open-access-efforts-at-duke-university-pressOver the past week we have shared a series of four blog posts covering open access at Duke University Press. Topics in the series included Project Euclid, Knowledge Unlatched, Environmental Humanities, and The Carlyle Letters Online.

Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid, shared information about the platform and the ways it supports open access in the mathematics and statistics world.

Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press, offered information about how we’ve participated with Knowledge Unlatched in the past and why we’ll continue in the future.

Brent Kinser, coordinating editor for The Carlyle Letters Online, shared his thoughts on the project and discussed his vision for its future.

We highlighted some of the exciting new content from the open-access journal Environmental Humanities, edited by Thom van Dooren and Elizabeth DeLoughrey, and the relationship between the journal and its five leading research university partners.

To learn more about these open-access initiatives at Duke University Press, read our previous blog posts.

Open Access: Duke University Press and the Knowledge Unlatched Initiative

We have created a series of five blog posts covering open access at Duke University Press. Today’s post features Knowledge Unlatched, an open-access initiative for humanities and social sciences books. We learned more about this initiative and the Press’s involvement through a conversation with Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press.

copy-of-ku_stacked_cmyk_green“The world is a better place when anyone can read what we’re publishing,” said Steve Cohn of Duke University Press’s 2013 decision to become one of the thirteen publisher participants in the original pilot collection for Knowledge Unlatched, an open-access initiative for humanities and social sciences books.

Through this pilot, libraries contributed funds to meet a target fee for a set of 28 books, covering the fees set by each publisher to “unlatch” a high-quality scholarly monograph. The “unlatched” titles were then made openly available on a Creative Commons license via OAPEN and HathiTrust as fully downloadable PDFs, while the publishers continued to sell their books in other formats. The pilot originally sought participation from 200 libraries, a target that was exceeded when close to 300 libraries from 24 countries joined Knowledge Unlatched.

Duke University Press participated with four books:

  • Biological Relatives: IVF, Stem Cells, and the Future of Kinship by Sarah Franklin
  • In Search of the Amazon: Brazil, the United States, and the Nature of a Region by Seth Garfield
  • My Voice Is My Weapon: Music, Nationalism, and the Poetics of Palestinian Resistance by David A. McDonald
  • Ever Faithful: Race, Loyalty, and the Ends of Empire in Spanish Cuba by David Sartorius

Authors have been very enthusiastic about the Knowledge Unlatched program. David Sartorius, author of Ever Faithful: Race, Loyalty, and the Ends of Empire in Spanish Cuba, credits Knowledge Unlatched with making it possible for Cuban scholars to find his work. He writes at the Knowledge Unlatched website: “As a scholar of Cuba, and Latin America more broadly, it’s important for me to share my research with the people whose past I study. Knowledge Unlatched makes that possible in ways that costly paper editions do not allow. Issues of price and distribution make much North Atlantic scholarship on Latin America out of reach in the region, and open access facilitates the kind of transnational exchange of ideas that needs to accompany the proliferation of other transnational phenomena in our present moment.”

A second collection for Knowledge Unlatched, “KU Round 2 Collection,” for 20152016 consists of 78 new titles from 26 publishers, available on both OAPEN and HathiTrust. Some publishers contributed individual books to be collected in disciplinary groups of ten; some publishers, like Duke and Michigan, offered a publisher package of ten books. Duke University Press contributed

  • Cold War Anthropology: The CIA, the Pentagon, and the Growth of Dual Use Anthropology by David H. Price
  • Dalit Studies by Ramnarayan S. Rawat and K. Satyanarayana
  • Diaspora and Trust: Cuba, Mexico, and the Rise of China by Adrian H. Hearn
  • Disciplinary Conquest: U.S. Scholars in South America, 1900–1945 by Ricardo D. Salvatore
  • Gesture and Power: Religion, Nationalism, and Everyday Performance in Congo by Yolanda Covington-Ward
  • Making Refuge: Somali Bantu Refugees and Lewiston, Maine by Catherine Besteman
  • Metroimperial Intimacies: Fantasy, Racial-Sexual Governance, and the Philippines in U.S. Imperialism, 18991913 by Victor Román Mendoza
  • Moral Economies of Corruption: State Formation and Political Culture in Nigeria by Steven Pierce
  • Negro Soy Yo: Hip Hop and Raced Citizenship in Neoliberal Cuba by Marc D. Perry
  • Sexual States: Governance and the Struggle over the Antisodomy Law in India by Jyoti Puri

The library pledging period for a third collection, “KU Select 2016,” closed January 31, 2017. This collection will feature 343 titles: 147 on the frontlist and 196 on the backlist. Currently, Duke University Press has 15 titles waiting to be made open access on the “KU Select 2016” frontlist and 11 titles on the backlist. To learn more about “KU Select 2016,” visit the Knowledge Unlatched Select 2016 Pledging Process.

Interview with Ethnohistory co-editor John F. Schwaller

We recently sat down with new Ethnohistory co-editor John F. Schwaller to discuss his background, how he’d like to shape the journal in the future, and plans for upcoming special issues. To learn more about Ethnohistory, visit dukeupress.edu/ethnohistory.

How did you come to be co-editor of this journal?

ddeh_64_1Matthew Restall [former co-editor of Ethnohistory] is a colleague and friend of mine and when he had served the journal for almost 10 years, he asked me if I would be interested in taking over the position from him. I’ve been a long-time follower and sometime author in Ethnohistory. My work in early colonial Mexico and especially my work in Nahuatl was very close to the journal, so it was a fun opportunity.

How would you like to shape the journal in the future?

What I really want to do is continue to emphasize high quality work on the rest of the Americas. Ethnohistory always has had very strong pieces on British and French North America. For the last ten to fifteen years the journal has included increasingly important pieces on what we now consider Latin America and I want to continue that tradition. Many of the articles have come from Mesoamerica—that’s Mexico and Central America. We have published a little bit in South America and we now have a couple of articles in the queue focused on South America. I would like to expand the offerings for Mesoamerica and South America significantly, so we have a really great presence for both continents in the journal.

What are some under-researched areas that you hope to publish about in the future?

I think, in terms of the profession at large it may not be as underserved, but there are certainly a lot of native peoples of South America that have not been covered sufficiently. We’re only beginning to see some really good studies of some of the native peoples of South America, and I would love to see more ethnohistories of peoples from South America.

Do you have any plans for upcoming special issues?

We have two proposals for special issues right now. One deals with Nahuatl speaking people, and I’m very excited about that. It’s an outgrowth of a panel at the American Society for Ethnohistory meeting in Nashville [November 2016] in which we looked at language and cultural identity in modern Mexico. We had several native Nahuatl speakers who were part of the panel. The organizers of the panel have asked if Ethnohistory would be interested in looking at the papers and the presentations for a special issue and I’ve told them absolutely. If it comes to fruition, at least one or perhaps two of the shorter presentations will be in Nahuatl with English translations.

What are you looking for in submissions?

I’m excited about everything. I really want people to think of Ethnohistory as an important place for their work to appear if they work on native peoples of the Americas.

Obviously with the revolution in languages that we’ve had since the 1970s, many of us are very excited by documentation and works based on documentation in native languages. We need not be blind to the fact that there still are valid and important sources that are only Spanish, Portuguese, English, or French, that can also enlighten us as to the history of native peoples.

To learn more about the journal or to subscribe, visit dukeupress.edu/ethnohistory. To submit your work to the journal, review the submission guidelines.

The Results Are In: Top Articles of 2016

The Results Are In

Recently, subscribers to American SpeechEthnohistoryFrench Historical Studies, and Labor voted on the most-read articles of 2016 that had the greatest influence on their teaching and research work in the past year. Check out the articles, made freely available.

American Speech

‘Good Old Immigrants of Yesteryear,’ Who Didn’t Learn English: Germans In Wisconsin” by Miranda E. Wilkerson and Joseph Salmons (2008)

Ethnohistory

Hybrid Cosmologies in Mesoamerica: A Reevaluation of the Yax Cheel Cab, a Maya World Tree,” by Timothy W. Knowlton and Gabrielle Vail (2010)

French Historical Studies

‘They Are Undesirables’: Local and National Responses to Gypsies during World War II” by Shannon L. Fogg (2008)

Labor

The Unknown Origins of the March on Washington: Civil Rights Politics and the Black Working Class” by William P. Jones (2010)

Thank you to all who voted!

Most-Read Articles of 2016

What were the most-read articles in 2016 from all Duke University Press journals? Check out the top 10 articles, made freely available for 2017.

  1. Ethiopia’s Original Sin

    Hassen Husein and Mohammed Ademo, World Policy Journal 33:3 (2016)

  2. The Return of Sanskrit: How an Old Language Got Caught up in India’s New Culture Wars

    Ananya Vajpeyi, World Policy Journal 33:3 (2016)

  3. Tangled Web: The Syrian Civil War and Its Implications

    Ted Galen Carpenter, Mediterranean Quarterly 24:1 (2013)

  4. Revisiting Postmodernism: An Interview with Fredric Jameson

    Conducted by Nico Baumbach, Damon R. Young, and Genevieve Yue, Social Text #127 (2016)

  5. Punks, Bulldaggers and Welfare Queens: The Radical Potential of Queer Politics?

    Cathy J. Cohen, GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies 3:4 (1997)

  6. Instafame: Luxury Selfies in the Attention Economy

    Alice E. Marwick, Public Culture 27:1 (2015)

  7. Necropolitics

    Achille Mbembe, translated by Libby Meintjes, Public Culture 15:1 (2003)

  8. Congo’s ‘Mr. X’: The Man who Fooled the UN

    Daniel Fajey, World Policy Journal 33:2 (2016)

  9. The Generation of Postmemory

    Marianne Hirsch, Poetics Today 29:1 (2008)

  10. My Words to Victor Frankenstein Above the Village of Chamounix: Performing Transgender Rage

    Susan Stryker, GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies 1:3 (1994)

 

Duke University Press Selects Silverchair for New Digital Products Platform

silverchairdup_pr_filled_k_pngSilverchair Information Systems (Silverchair) and Duke University Press announced today a new publishing technology partnership to redevelop and host Duke University Press’s extensive collection of scholarly journals, books, and electronic collections in the humanities and social sciences on Silverchair’s online publishing platform.

Duke University Press publishes more than 50 journals, offers five digital collections, and has well over 2,000 scholarly books available online. All humanities and social sciences journals and e-books will migrate to the Silverchair platform, providing scholars with a single reading and research experience across books and journals.

“We are enthusiastic to collaborate with another of the world’s most respected university presses,” said Thane Kerner, Silverchair CEO. “Duke University Press’s omni-format offerings will benefit greatly from our integrated, flexible delivery platform, enabling rapid ideation and experimentation in new ways to serve scholars and libraries. Supporting this deep and interconnected body of scholarship in the humanities and social sciences will drive Silverchair’s technology in new and exciting directions.”

“After long and careful assessment of platform technologies and service offerings, we believe Silverchair is the most capable of delivering the sort of integrated, responsive platform we have long envisioned for our books and journals—one that can showcase both the variety and the cohesion of our highly interdisciplinary scholarship,” said Steve Cohn, director of Duke University Press. “Silverchair offers us a modern, secure technology platform combined with the kind of creative and flexible approach necessary to match our innovative, dynamic publications and products.”

Duke University Press’s content will be available on the Silverchair platform in January 2018. Librarians and sales agents can consult our Platform Migration Resource Page for additional details.

To read the full press release, visit our Library Resource Center.

David Scott wins CELJ Distinguished Editor Award for 2016

0105171630Congratulations to David Scott, editor of Small Axe, for his 2016 Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) Distinguished Editor Award. The awards were announced on Thursday, January 5, 2017, during the 2017 Modern Language Association annual meeting held in Philadelphia.

The Distinguished Editor Award is given to an editor who has had a major influence on the field of scholarship in which they publish. Small Axe focuses on publishing critical work that examines the ideas that guided the formation of Caribbean modernities. It mainly includes scholarly articles, opinion essays, and interviews, but it also includes literary works of fiction and poetry, visual arts, and reviews.

ddsmx_20_2_50The journal, now in its 20th volume, just published its 50th issue, “What is Journal Work?” which features a preface by David Scott on the journal and the ethos of journal work. From the preface:

When, in the company of a few fellow travelers, I initiated Small Axe in Kingston in 1996–97, many people said to me, confidentially and with my interest in view, that it would be at best a short-lived enterprise. It was grand, yes, ambitious even, but it wouldn’t last. That was always the thing—it wouldn’t last. Nothing like it did. The Caribbean is awash, they knowingly said, with well-intentioned initiatives that run aground sooner than later. In fact, nothing is more characteristic of Caribbean intellectual life than this penchant for starting new ventures that never have any chance whatsoever of reproducing themselves. And so on . . . Now, honestly,I never took these prophecies of doom to be expressions of ill will, of what Jamaicans lyrically call badmindedness—though of course they might well have been. After all, the truth is that I too was wondering, not because of a wavering or uncertain commitment on my part, need‐less to say, but as a matter, if you like, of thinking the future in the present. Beginnings are one thing, hard enough, to be sure. But what would “lasting” mean? What would be the point at which Small Axe could be said to have “lasted”? These were, in part, abstract questions(in any case, I brushed them aside) because although I was always self-conscious of seeking something larger in the Small Axe initiative (remember, New World Quarterly and Savacou were the models I had before me, and they styled themselves as expressions of “movements”), I was at that early point literally feeling my way from one issue of the journal to the next. And from the haphazard and chaotic inside of each of these issues, encountering and resolving their specific challenges, it was impossible to discern what they would add up to—whether the shape of something more than the sum of all the issues put together would emerge from within what we were anyway carrying on with.

David Scott has edited Small Axe since its inception in 1997. To learn more about the journal and to read a sample issue, visit smallaxe.dukejournals.org.

Call for Papers: Policy Analysis and the Politics of Health Policy

ddjhppl_41_1How, when, and where does academic policy analysis about the health care system enter the policymaking process?  How have healthcare policymakers seen and used policy analysis in the development, implementation, and perhaps repeal of the Affordable Care Act?  As the US moves from a more technocratic to a more populist administration, how is the role of policy analysis likely to shift? We invite papers for a conference at the Wagner School, New York University in spring 2017 to explore the role of policy analysis in the political process, focusing particularly on the Affordable Care Act. The Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law will accept five to seven papers from the conference to run in a special issue after undergoing peer review. Sherry Glied, Dean of the NYU Wagner School of Public Service, is Guest Editor of this Special Issue of JHPPL.

Background

The relationship between scholars in health policy and policymakers has long been contested.  Back in 1966, following the passage of Medicare and Medicaid, Odin Anderson, reviewing the relationship between research and policy, reported that he was “pessimistic” and concluded a dispiriting review by asking “what is then the value of social and economic research in the health field?”  In the ensuing 50 years, health policy scholars have continued to publish and policymakers have continued to legislate and implement health policy.  Funders increasingly demand dissemination plans to ensure that the findings of the research they support are influential in the policy process.  A new scholarly field of “knowledge translation” has emerged.  Yet many observers remain pessimistic about the influence of evidence on policymaking.

Many aspects of the Affordable Care Act’s development and implementation offered opportunities for scholarship to influence the process – from the initial decision to focus on health reform, to the design of the exchanges and the Medicaid expansion, to the investment in comparative effectiveness research and delivery system improvements, through the most recent repeal-and-replace debates.  The Law’s path has wound through Congress, the Federal Executive Branch, the Courts, and through State Legislatures and Governor’s Offices.  How, where, and when did policy-related scholarship play a part in these processes?  How, where, and when should it have played such a part?  The purpose of this research conference is to explore these questions both positively and normatively.  While the focus of the conference will be on the Affordable Care Act, we are also open to papers that consider other aspects of health policymaking.

Possible Paper Topics and Target Audience

We seek to cast a broad net and are open to studies by political scientists, economists, sociologists, historians, health services researchers, and others. Papers could examine differences and similarities in how research evidence is used in the various institutions of government (committees, budget agencies, executive branch departments, the judiciary); how evidence plays into lobbying and stakeholder engagement; the uses of evidence in the context of Federal/State relations; the role of the technocracy (expert advisory panels, budget agencies, actuaries, regulatory impact analyses, budget scores); how policymakers address conflicting research findings (for example, in the discussions of job loss); how Congress acts when evidence is sparse (as in the case of the CLASS Act), how partisanship affects the use of evidence; as well as papers that explore more normative issues, such as the relationship between scholarship and accountability.

The target audiences for these papers include academic researchers; funders; and health policy makers at the local, state, and federal levels. Papers should be written so as to be accessible to all of these audiences.

Submission Guidelines

Interested authors should submit a 1-3 page proposal by March 1, 2017 by email to Jennifer Costanza, Managing Editor of JHPPL, at jhppl[at]brown[dot]edu. Please put “Policy Analysis Conference” in the subject line of the message. JHPPL will respond to the proposals by March 15, 2017.  Accepted authors will present completed papers at the conference at NYU on May 2, 2017.  The papers will then undergo peer review for a special issue of the journal.

Best Books of the Year

It is almost the end of the year, which means it’s time for best books lists. We’re pleased to share the accolades our authors and their books have amassed from a variety of outlets this year:

Life and Death on the New York Dance FloorTim Lawrence’s Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-1983 has received praise from some big names in the music industry. Life and Death marbles 1980s dance culture with politics, funk, and liberation. The Village Voice named it one of their Ten Notable Books of 2016 calling it “scrupulously researched” and a “marvelously detailed history.” Over at Music Is My Sanctuary, they named Lawrence’s book one of the Top 10 Music Books of 2016. David Cantin writes, “This eagerly awaited follow-up to Lawrence’s classic Love Saves The Day is by far my favourite book of the year. A brilliantly documented and written piece that ventures into the New York party scene with great depth.”

sharpe_wake

In the Wake: On Blackness and Being by Christina Sharpe received high praise from The Guardian as one of its Best Books of 2016. Madeleine Thien says, “The book that will live on in me from this year is Christina Sharpe’s In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (Duke), on living in the wake of the catastrophic violence of legal chattel slavery. In the Wake speaks in so many multiple ways (poetry, memory, theory, images) and does so in language that is never still. It is, in part, about keeping watch, not unseeing the violence that has become normative, being in the hold, holding on and still living.” Additionally, and in light of the political and social upheavals this year, Flavorwire has named In the Wake one of its 15 Nonfiction Books from 2016 to Bolster the Resistance.

mounting-frustration-cover

Double congratulations are also in order for Susan E. Cahan’s book Mounting Frustration: The Art Museum in the Age of Black Power. Culture Type chose it as one of the 12 Best Black Art Books of 2016a list that includes works that are “in various ways reframing art history.” Vulture included Mounting Frustration in their 10 best Art Books of 2016 category claiming, “Protest histories like this feel more vital than ever as we prepare to set forth into the long winter of unrest ahead.”


Rolling Stone
has named Greg Tate’s Flyboy 2: The Greg Tate Reader one of its 10 Best Music Books of 2016. Michaelangelo Matos says, “Greg Tate’s ferocious, slang-tinged salvos and flyboydeep-rooted historical analysis have inspired readers and intimidated colleagues for decades.”

making-refuge-coverCatherine Besteman’s book recounting the experiences of Somali migrants—Making Refuge: Somali Bantu Refugees and Lewiston, Mainehas been included in Foreign Affairs‘s Best Books of 2016. Arguing for the importance and timelessness of Besteman’s work, reviewer Nicolas van de Walle writes, “Besteman eschews social science jargon to tell her story with great insight and empathy. Her book should be required reading for policymakers currently debating what to do with refugees from Syria.”

978-0-8223-6224-1_borderDonna Haraway’s latest, Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, was chosen by POSTmatter as one of their Top 10 Books of 2016. They say, “Through a combination of science fact, science fiction, speculative feminism and speculative fabulation, Staying with The Trouble maps out new ways to reconfigure our relationship with the planet, and makes a case for its future.”

Over at T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Tim Lawrence’s biography of Arthur RussellHold On to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992has made it on to musician Devonté “Dev” Hynes’s 10 Favorite Books list. Hynes calls it “an inspiring yet tragic read” that he’s read “cover to cover three times.”

Only the Road

And finally, World Literature Today cited Margaret Randall’s anthology of Cuban poetry, Only the Road / Solo el Camino: Eight Decades of Cuban Poetry, as one of its 75 Notable Translations of 2016. Only the Road / Solo el Camino provides an English-speaking audience with an expansive bilingual collection of work from Cuba and its diaspora.