Press News

Gift Books On Sale

Our Cyber Monday sale continues today and tomorrow. Are you looking for some books that would make great gifts? Here are some suggestions. Use coupon CYBER22 to save 50% on these and all in-stock and pre-order titles.

Looking for gifts for sports fans? We have two new books about basketball. Capturing the magnificence and mastery of today’s most accomplished NBA players while paying homage to the devotion of the countless congregants in the global church of pickup basketball, in Lost in the Game Thomas Beller charts the game’s inexorable gravitational hold on those who love it. And in Big Game, Small World, Alexander Wolff travels the globe in search of what basketball can tell us about the world, and what the world can tell us about the game.

How about a memoir? Give your gay uncle Memories of a Gay Catholic Boyhood by John D’Emilio, in which the historian takes readers from his working-class Bronx neighborhood and Columbia University to New York’s hidden gay male subculture and the political and social upheavals of the late 1960s. Perhaps you also have a tía or two; they might enjoy Magical Habits by Monica Huerta, in which she draws on her experiences growing up in her family’s Mexican restaurants and her life as an academic to sketch out habits of living that allow us to consider what it means to live with history as we are caught up in it and how those histories bear on our capacities to make sense of our lives. Have a friend who is a graphic novel fan? Give them The Inheritance, a graphic memoir by theorist and filmmaker Elizabeth A. Povinelli, which explores the events, traumas, and powers that divide and define our individual and collective pasts and futures. Another recent memoir is Atlantis, an Autoanthropology, a literary memoir and autoethnography by poet Nathaniel Tarn which captures this multiplicity and reaches for the uncertainties of a life lived in a dizzying array of times, cultures, and environments. 

For poetry fans, we have many excellent gift ideas. Nomenclature collects eight volumes of Dionne Brand’s poetry published between 1983 and 2010, as well as a new long poem, the titular Nomenclature for the time being. In or, on being the other woman, Simone White considers the dynamics of contemporary black feminist life through a book-length poem. When the Smoke Cleared contains poetry written by incarcerated poets in Attica Prison and journal entries and poetry by Celes Tisdale, who led poetry workshops following the uprising there in 1971. In Maroon Choreography fahima ife speculates on the long (im)material, ecological, and aesthetic afterlives of black fugitivity. In three long-form poems and a lyrical essay, they examine black fugitivity as an ongoing phenomenon we know little about beyond what history tells us. And in Good night the pleasure was ours musician and poet David Grubbs melts down and recasts three decades of playing music on tour into a book-length poem, bringing to a close the trilogy that includes Now that the audience is assembled and The Voice in the Headphones. Get the whole set!

Got a musician or music fan in your life? Here are some recent gift-worthy music titles. Jazz fans will enjoy Ain’t But a Few of Us, a collection of essays by and interviews with Black Jazz writers, edited by Willard Jenkins. Or give Cisco Bradley’s Universal Tonality, a highly-praised biography of jazz bassist William Parker. Perhaps their taste runs to New Wave music instead? Check out No Machos or Pop Stars by Gavin Butt, which tells the fascinating story of the post-punk scene in Leeds, and A Kiss across the Ocean by Richard T. Rodríguez, which  examines the relationship between British post-punk musicians and their Latinx audiences in the United States since the 1980s. Rap and hip hop fans will appreciate Breaks in the Air, in which John Klaess tells the story of rap’s emergence on New York City’s airwaves by examining how artists and broadcasters adapted hip hop’s performance culture to radio.

For the activists in your life, we suggest Black Disability Politics by Sami Schalk, which demonstrates that the work of Black disability politics not only exists but is essential to the future of Black liberation movements. And for those interested in advocating for veterans, we suggest Our Veterans by Suzanne Gordon, Steve Early, and Jasper Craven,

And finally, since we’re Duke University Press, after all, we bet you have some theory fans on your gift list. Make sure they have a copy of Lauren Berlant’s On the Inconvenience of Other People, which Judith Butler calls “magisterial” and “brilliant.”

Books ordered this week will arrive in time for Hanukkah and Christmas if shipped to a US address. We cannot guarantee holiday arrival for international shipments. See all the fine print here. Pre-order titles will not arrive in time for the holidays.

We’re pleased that our distributors Combined Academic Publishers and University of Toronto Press are also participating in the sale. Customers outside North and South America should order from CAP using the same CYBER22 coupon code for faster and cheaper shipping. Customers in Canada should head to the UTP site where the prices will reflect the 50% discount, no coupon needed.

Shop now because the sale ends tomorrow, November 30, at 11:59 pm Eastern time.

Shop Our Cyber Monday Sale

Text in black, white, blue & green: Duke University Press. Flash Sale. 50% off. Use code CYBER 22.All in-stock books & journal issues. November 28th-30th.

Did you miss our Fall Sale? Have some books you need for holiday gifts or next semester’s classes? You’re in luck! Today through Wednesday, November 30, you can save 50% on all in-stock and pre-order books and journal issues during our special Cyber Monday sale.

To get the discount, shop our website and enter the coupon code CYBER22 when you check out. Please note that the discount does not apply to journal subscriptions or society memberships. See all the fine print here.

We’re pleased that our international distributors Combined Academic Publishers and University of Toronto Press are also participating in the sale. Customers outside North and South America should order from CAP using the same CYBER22 coupon code for faster and cheaper shipping. Customers in Canada should head to the UTP site where the prices will reflect the 50% discount, no coupon needed.

Books ordered this week will arrive in time for Hanukkah and Christmas if shipped to a U.S. address. We cannot guarantee holiday arrival for international shipments.

Act fast, because this sale is over at 11:59 PM Eastern time on Wednesday, November 30.

Introducing our Spring 2023 Catalog

Cover of Duke University Press Spring Summer 2023 catalog. It features art by Berna Reale, an image of a person dressed in black tactical gear, wearing a muzzle, on a red horse.

We are thrilled to unveil our Spring 2023 catalog, which is packed with fantastic new books and journal issues that will be published between December 2022 and August 2023. 

The cover features artwork by Berna Reale, from Dissident Practices: Brazilian Women Artists, 1960s–2020s by Claudia Calirman examines sixty years of visual art by prominent and emerging Brazilian women artists from the 1960s to the present. Other art titles include Spirit in the Land, the catalog for a Nasher Museum of Art exhibition curated by Trevor Schoonmaker; and Don′t Look Away: Art, Nonviolence, and Preventive Publics in Contemporary Europe by  Brianne Cohen, which considers the role of contemporary art in developing a public commitment to ending structural violence in Europe. 

We are excited to launch Practices, a new series edited by Margret Grebowicz, with four books this spring. The series features short, thoughtful, yet playful books on various hobbies and pursuits. In Fly-Fishing, Christopher Schaberg, who grew up fly-fishing in Northern Michigan and now casts his rod in Louisiana’s bayous, ponders his lifetime pursuit of the widely mythologized art of fly fishing. Stewart Lawrence Sinclair—who learned to juggle as a child and paid his way through college by busking—shares his experiences of taking up juggling after an episode of suicidal ideation, his time juggling on the streets and, ultimately, finding comfort in juggling during the COVID-19 pandemic in Juggling. In Raving, McKenzie Wark takes readers into the undisclosed locations of New York’s thriving queer rave scene, showing how raving to techno is an art and technique at which queer and trans bodies might be particularly adept, but which is for anyone who lets the beat seduce them. And in Running by Lindsey A. Freeman, a former college track athlete, presents a feminist and queer handbook of running in which she considers what it means to run as a visibly queer person while exploring how running puts us in contact with ourselves and others.

Mendings by Megan Sweeney tells an intimate story about family, selfhood, and love and loss, showing how her lifetime practice of sewing and mending clothes becomes a way of living.

The Williamsburg Avant-Garde: Experimental Music and Sound on the Brooklyn Waterfront by Cisco Bradley chronicles the rise and fall of the underground music and art scene in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn between the late 1980s and early 2010s. Also of interest to music scholars will be Working Musicians: Labor and Creativity in Film and Television Production by Timothy D. Taylor.

Cover of The Latinx Guide to Graduate School by Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales and Magdalena L. Barrera. Cover is blue green, with cartoon depictions of the backs of 7 students in graduation outfits. Each graduation cap is decorated, some having flags, others having phrases in Spanish, and one depicting the word dreamer.

We have two great new books on higher education coming out. In The Autocratic Academy: Reenvisioning Rule within America’s Universities, Timothy V. Kaufman-Osborn outlines the history of American higher education’s formal organization as an incorporated autocracy that is tied to capitalism, arguing that the academy must reconstitute itself in accordance with the principles of democratic republicanism in which members choose who govern and can hold them accountable. And in The Latinx Guide to Graduate School by Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales and Magdalena L. Barrera provide prospective and current Latinx graduate students in the humanities and social sciences fields with a roadmap for surviving and thriving in advanced degree programs. 

Also of interest in Latinx studies is Puta Life: Seeing Latinas, Working Sex by Juana María Rodríguez, which probes the ways that sexual labor and Latina sexuality become visual phenomena. In The Force of Witness: Contra Feminicide, Rosa-Linda Fregoso examines the contra feminicide movement in Mexico and other feminist efforts to eradicate gender violence, theorizing the notion of witness as a force of collectivity and a constellation of multiple social locations and intersectional practices that work together to abolish feminicidal violence. In Disappearing Rooms: The Hidden Theaters of Immigration Law, Michelle Castañeda  lays bare the criminalization of race enacted every day in U.S. immigration courts and detention centers in order to reimagine alternatives to the deportation regimes. The book features  original illustrations by artist-journalist, Molly Crabapple. Drawing on memoir, creative writing, theoretical analysis, and ethnography in Santo Domingo, Havana, and New Jersey, in Circuits of the Sacred: A Faggotology in the Black Latinx Caribbean, Carlos Ulises Decena examines transnational black Caribbean immigrant queer life and spirit.

Other titles in queer theory and LGBTQ studies include Kids on the Street: Queer Kinship and Religion in San Francisco’s Tenderloin by Joseph Plaster, The Queer Art of History: Queer Kinship after Fascism by Jennifer V. Evans, The Specter of Materialism: Queer Theory and Marxism in the Age of the Beijing Consensus by Petrus Liu, Envisioning African Intersex: Challenging Colonial and Racist Legacies in South African Medicine by Amanda Lock Swarr and Sexuality and the Rise of China: The Post-1990s Gay Generation in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Mainland China by Travis S. K. Kong.

We have a number of excellent titles in disability studies coming out. In Activist Affordances: How Disabled People Improvise More Habitable Worlds, Arseli Dokumaci draws on ethnographic work with differently disabled people whose ingenuity, labor, and artfulness allows them to achieve seemingly daily tasks like lifting a glass of water or taking clothes off. In Crip Colony: Mestizaje, US Imperialism, and the Queer Politics of Disability in the Philippines, Sony Coráñez Bolton examines the racial politics of disability, mestizaje, and sexuality in the Philippines. The contributors to Crip Genealogies, edited by Mel Y. Chen, Alison Kafer, Eunjung Kim, and Julie Avril Minich, reorient the field of disability studies by centering the work of transnational feminism, queer of color critique, and trans scholarship and activism. And in On Learning to Heal,or, What Medicine Doesn’t Know, Ed Cohen draws on fifty years of living with Crohn’s disease to consider how Western medicine’s turn from an “art of healing” toward a “science of medicine” deeply affects both medical practitioners and their patients.

We continue to offer cutting-edge Black studies titles, including Riotous Deathscapes by Hugo ka Canham, Death′s Futurity: The Visual Life of Black Power by Sampada Aranke, Hidden Histories: Faith and Black Lesbian Leadership by Monique Moultrie, Trafficking in Antiblackness: Modern-Day Slavery, White Indemnity, and Racial Justice by Lyndsey P. Beutin, and To Be Nsala′s Daughter: Decomposing the Colonial Gaze by Chérie N. Rivers. 

You’ll definitely want to check out new anthropology titles like Screening Social Justice: Brave New Films and Documentary Activism by Sherry Ortner, Glyphosate and the Swirl: An Agroindustrial Chemical on the Move by Vincanne Adams, Being Dead Otherwise by Anne Allison, Hard Luck and Heavy Rain: The Ecology of Stories in Southeast Texas by Joseph C. Russo and many more. 

Preview forthcoming special issues of our many journals, including The Science of Sex Itself an issue of GLQ, Queer and Trans Dialectology: Exploring the Intersectionality of Regionality an issue of American Speech, The Sports Issue an issue of Transgender Studies Quarterly, Crisis to Catastrophe an issue of boundary 2, Multispecies Justice an issue of Cultural Politics, and Critical AI: A Field in Formation an issue of American Literature.

There’s so much more on our great Spring list, including new books in Asian studies, African studies, American studies, literary and cultural studies, media studies, and more. We invite you to download the catalog and bookmark all your favorites. And be sure to sign up for our email alerts so you’ll know when titles you’re interested in are available.

University Press Week: What’s #NextUp in Publishing?

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Continuing our celebration of University Press Week 2022, we’re happy to share what’s #NextUp in publishing! We’ll turn it over to Charles Brower, Senior Project Editor of Journals here at Duke University Press.

Since 2020, the books and journals project editors of Duke University Press’s Editing, Design, and Production (EDP) department have sponsored a mentorship program for BIPOC students and recent graduates who are interested in pursuing a career in scholarly publishing. Our goal has been to provide a solid grounding in editing and editorial project management particularly, and more generally to try to offer a solution to that perpetual dilemma faced by so many—especially those from underrepresented groups—who aspire to enter the profession but have no publishing experience. In addition to the practical experience they get as student interns working for our editorial group, our mentees participate in in-depth discussions of copyediting, house style, workflows, interacting with authors, and many other topics that fall under the broad umbrella of editorial and scholarly publishing professional skills. By the end of their participation in the program, mentees are conversant, if not yet fluent, in the Chicago Manual of Style and have a specific, detailed sense of the work we do. 

The program had a relatively modest beginning: our mentee would meet with me and a colleague from the books side of our editorial group in a weekly or biweekly Zoom meeting, as the mentee’s work and/or school schedule allowed. In a sense, the Great Cloistering brought on by the pandemic had a silver lining with respect to these sessions, since we were able to meet the mentees wherever they happened to be working or studying. The colleague I partnered with for the first two years has left the press, but two other colleagues have stepped up to participate this year. And our ambitions for the new year are to involve even more colleagues from around the press to introduce our mentees to many other scholarly publishing roles and professional opportunities. 

It’s our hope, of course, that we have a lasting, positive effect on the nascent careers of these young people, even if they decide to enter another profession. Without exception, the participants in the program have been engaged, enthusiastic, and idealistic, and if they do become colleagues in scholarly publishing, they’ll be boons to the profession. And while our mission always is to support and inspire our mentees, I’d be remiss if I didn’t say that I too have gotten a great deal out of participating in the program, whether through revisiting the habits and ethos that define how I edit or through interacting with and being inspired by a talented young person. I encourage anyone in the scholarly community reading this to look for opportunities to mentor, whether through similar programs at your institution or by reaching out to a junior colleague. The potential benefits for them, you, and the profession generally can’t be overstated. 

-Charles Brower 

Please continue on the blog tour by visiting the other university presses participating today. Head over to Temple University Press to read about their new Transformations book series, then check out the University Press of Kansas‘s feature on their new Lyda Conley Series on Trailblazing Indigenous Futures. The University of Pittsburg Press shares an interview with their new Acquisitions Editor Will Hammell about starting new areas of acquisition, and the University of Nebraska Press features a blog post about their Provocations series. The University of Minnesota Press details new developments in the Manifold digital publishing platform, the University of North Carolina Press unveils their new Black Women’s History series, and Leuven University Press spotlights the book Black Matrilineage, Photography, and Representation. The University Press of Kentucky gives an overview of the Appalachian Futures series with Editor Abby Freeland, the University of Notre Dame Press posts the results of their first-ever Publishing Boot Camp, and the Hopkins Press Internship Program enters is second year. The University of Florida Press offers a video with editors of their new series Caribbean Crossroads series, and the University of Michigan Press features an interview with Acquisitions Editor Ellen Bauerle about a newly emerging Greek/Modern Intersections series. Read about another internship program at the University of Alabama Press, and learn about the Texas A&M University Press‘s TV show on PBS. Penn State University Press shares a post from Acquisitions Editor Archna Patel about developments in their Africana studies list, and Purdue University Press Director Justin Race outlines their new Navigating Careers in Higher Education series as well as their new website. The University of Washington Press runs a Q&A with editors of the new series, Abolition: Emancipation from the Carceral, and the University of Toronto Press features a post by one of their editors about a new series. Finally, the University of Illinois Press highlights exciting changes to their Disability Histories series. 

University Press Week: What’s #NextUp in Journals?

We’re celebrating University Press Week by participating in a blog tour! Today, we’re joining several presses in describing what’s #NextUp for our journals. This coming year, we’re thrilled to welcome two start-up journals to our publishing program: Critical AI and Monsoon: Journal of the Indian Ocean Rim. Both journals will begin publication with Duke University Press in spring 2023.

Critical AI, edited by Lauren M.E. Goodlad, is an interdisciplinary journal based at Rutgers University’s Center for Cultural Analysis and is affiliated with the Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science. Open to ideas born of new interdisciplinary alliances; design justice principles; antiracist, decolonial, and democratic political practices; community-centered collaborations; experimental pedagogies; and public outreach, the journal functions as a space for the production of knowledge, research endeavors, and teaching ideas that focus on the ongoing history of machine technologies and their place in the world.

Critical AI is legible to scholars across disciplines as well as to interested readers outside the academy. At the broadest level, the journal’s mission is to widen circles of scholarship across disciplines and national borders, encourage informed citizens, and activate a democratic culture through which the research, implementation, and evaluation of digital technologies is undertaken in dialogue with scholars, students, citizens, communities, policy makers, and the public at large.

Monsoon, edited by Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf and Jeremy Prestholdt, is an initiative of The Africa Institute. The journal seeks to offer a new forum for presenting research, debating critical themes, and highlighting emerging trends in Indian Ocean studies—with an emphasis on Africa and the Western Indian Ocean. Likewise, it will fill a gap in the extant literature on the region, which has consistently sidelined African and Gulf societies.

The name of the journal—Monsoon—is inspired by seasonal rains and winds for interregional sojourns that have facilitated the integration of the Indian Ocean rim over thousands of years. The journal aims to interrogate these multitudinous forces, examining overlapping forms of cosmopolitanism, circulation, inequality, and exploitation.

Please continue on the blog tour by visiting the other university presses participating today. University of Chicago Press features what’s new with their journals. Medieval Institute Publications introduces their newest journal, Medieval Ecocriticisms. Johns Hopkins University Press highlights their new journal, Cusp. University of Pennsylvania Press shares an interview with Jacob Remes, co-editor of the Journal of Disaster Studies. University of Toronto Press has a post by a member of their journals team. The University of the West Indies Press highlights the Caribbean Conjunctures: The Caribbean Studies Association (CSA) Journal. And Catholic University of America Press introduces their three new journals.

Final Day of Fall Sale

Today is the final day to save 50% on books and journal issues during our Fall Sale. Use coupon FL22 and be sure to shop before 11:59 pm EDT.

Customers outside North and South America can use the FL22 coupon through today at our UK-based distributor Combined Academic Publishers to save on shipping, particularly in Europe. Customers in Canada may now order directly from the University of Toronto Press. UTP is our distribution partner in Canada and can offer significantly improved shipping times. No coupon code is needed on the UTP site (sale applies to Duke titles only).

And don’t forget that you can now pre-order titles up to five months before publication date with the 50% off coupon as well! Those titles will ship when they become available.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (Monday-Friday, 8-5 Eastern Time).

See the fine print and FAQs here. Don’t delay, shop now!

Duke Books and Journals Available Open-Access

It’s Open Access Week! Did you know that you can read many of our books and journals for free? Duke University Press is committed to offering many of our titles in an open-access format. We participate in multiple OA programs, including Knowledge Unlatched, TOME (Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem), and SHMP (the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot). Each year we release about a dozen books that are open access. You may be able to read these books online via your own library. You can also find some of them on Project MUSE, OAPEN, and on our own website.

Recent open-access books that you can read for free thanks to our partnership with Knowledge Unlatched include Cocaine, edited by Enrique Desmond Arias and Thomas Grisaffi; Claiming Union Womanhood by Brandi Clay Brimmer; Virulent Zones by Lyle Fearnley; and Embodying Black Religions in Africa and Its Diasporas, edited by Yolanda Covington-Ward and Jeanette S. Jouili.

Our second project with the Sustainable History Monograph Project (SHMP) is Workers Like All the Rest of Them by Elizabeth Quay Hutchison.

Recent books freely available via our partnership with TOME include The Small Matter of Suing Chevron by Suzana Sawyer, Scales of Captivity by Mary Pat Brady, The Florida Room by Alexandra T. Vazquez, and Architecture and Development by Ayala Levin.

Authors and their institutions also help us to make their books available via open access. Many readers are very excited about the open access version of Black Disability Politics by Sami Schalk, which you can read for free now on our website. You can also read Paradoxes of Nostalgia by Penny Von Eschen and Obeah, Orisa, and Religious Identity in Trinidad volumes one and two by Tracey E. Hucks and Dianne M. Stewart for free.

Our open-access journals are Critical Times, Demography, Environmental Humanities, liquid blackness, the Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies, and our newest open-access journal Trans Asia Photography, which joined the Press in 2022. Twentieth-century volumes (1918–1999) of the Hispanic American Historical Review are also available open access.

Many thanks to the libraries and institutions that support all these open-access efforts. Read more about open access at Duke University Press here.

Fall Sale Continues for One More Week

Have you shopped our Fall sale yet? You have only one more week; the sale ends Friday, October 28. Use coupon code FL22 to save 50% on all in-stock and pre-order books and journal issues.

Cover of On the Inconvenience of Other People by Lauren Berlant. Bright pink cover features a painted picture of the face of a black cat with one green eye open.

Bestsellers in the sale so far are Lauren Berlant’s On the Inconvenience of Other People, Black Disability Politics by Sami Schalk, and Obeah, Orisa, and Religious Identity in Trinidad, volumes one and two, by Tracey E. Hucks and Diane M. Stewart. Also selling well is The Latinx Guide to Graduate School by Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales and Magdalena L. Barrera. It won’t be out until March but you can pre-order it now at the discount and receive it in the spring.

Our distributor in the UK, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and the Pacific, Combined Academic Publishers, is pleased to extend the same 50% off discount to our customers there. Since overseas shipping can be slow and expensive, we highly encourage everyone in their territory to order directly from them using the same FL22 coupon code.

Cover of The Latinx Guide to Graduate School by Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales and Magdalena L. Barrera. Cover is blue green, with cartoon depictions of the backs of 7 students in graduation outfits. Each graduation cap is decorated, some having flags, others having phrases in Spanish, and one depicting the word dreamer.

Customers in Canada may now order directly from the University of Toronto Press. UTP is our distribution partner in Canada and can offer significantly improved shipping times. No coupon code is needed on the UTP site (sale applies to Duke titles only).

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. Regular shipping rates apply.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (Monday-Friday, 8-5 Eastern Time).

Save 50% During Our Fall Sale

We’re excited to announce the start of our Fall Sale. Today through October 28, you can save 50% on all in-stock and pre-order books and journal issues with coupon code FL22.

Our distributor in the UK, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and the Pacific, Combined Academic Publishers, is pleased to extend the same 50% off discount to our customers there. And this year, our Canadian distributor, University of Toronto Press is also happy to extend the discount. To save time and money on shipping, we highly encourage everyone outside the US and Central and South American to order directly from CAP or UTP using the same FL22 coupon code.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to e-books, apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final. We now accept pre-orders on books within 5 months of publication. Look for “Availability: Pre-Order” below the buy button and a release date on the product page to identify titles eligible for pre-publication order. You may use coupon code FL22 on titles in pre-order status. You will receive those books when they are published. The discount may not be combined with any other offers.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (Monday-Friday, 8-5 Eastern Time).

Introducing the Practices Book Series

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the launch of Practices, a new book series edited by Margret Grebowicz.  

Books in the Practices series are for real-life hobbyists, devotees, and enthusiasts. They are by and about amateurs in the original sense—those who engage in pursuits out of sheer love and fascination. Practices books show how an ordinary activity like fishing, running, or juggling helps us come to understand ourselves and the world around us. Sleek and incisive, they reveal the pleasures of losing oneself in doing anything that holds sway over us, no matter how common or minor it might seem. They map new places inside us. Practices books will intrigue and challenge an activity’s most ardent practitioners as well as those who never considered their appeal.

Editor Elizabeth Ault, who brought the series to the Press, says, “Practices represents the best of what Duke University Press is known for while also representing a new set of opportunities for us, highlighting distinctive and thoughtful voices from inside and outside the academy in deep and playful conversations. The books are stylish and companionable invitations to reflect on the practices they highlight as well as those that form our own ways of being in the world.”

The first Practices books will be published in March 2023. 

  •  Fly-Fishing by Christopher Schaberg. The author, who grew up fly-fishing in Northern Michigan and now casts his rod in Louisiana’s bayous, ponders his lifetime pursuit of the widely mythologized art of fly fishing.
  • Juggling by Stewart Lawrence Sinclair. Sinclair—who learned to juggle as a child and paid his way through college by busking—shares his experiences of taking up juggling after an episode of suicidal ideation, his time juggling on the streets and, ultimately, finding comfort in juggling during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Raving by McKenzie Wark. Wark takes readers into the undisclosed locations of New York’s thriving queer rave scene, showing how raving to techno is an art and technique at which queer and trans bodies might be particularly adept, but which is for anyone who lets the beat seduce them.
  • Running by Lindsey A. Freeman. Former college track athlete Freeman presents a feminist and queer handbook of running in which she considers what it means to run as a visibly queer person while exploring how running puts us in contact with ourselves and others.

We hope the books’ design will encourage collecting multiple volumes. They will be produced in a small 5×7 format and will share a similar look and feel, making it easy for booksellers to display them together.

Future books in the series will address jigsaw puzzling and foraging. Margret Grebowicz is soliciting additional books for Practices. Interested authors can send a pitch to dukepractices@gmail.com

Editorial Director Gisela Fosado says, “Duke University Press is known for publishing provocative and creative ideas and the Practices series will continue this tradition, but in the form of snappy little books with broad appeal. During these unsettling times, learning about meaning-making through life practices is a salve we all need.”