Press News

New Journals in 2020: History of the Present & Romanic Review

This coming year, we’re excited to welcome History of the Present: A Journal of Critical History and the Romanic Review to our journals publishing program. Both journals will begin publication with Duke University Press in late spring.

History of the Present, a journal devoted to history as a critical endeavor, is edited by Joan Wallach Scott, Andrew Aisenberg, Brian Connolly, Ben Kafka, Jennifer Morgan, Sylvia Schafer, and Mrinalini Sinha. The journal’s aim is twofold: to create a space in which scholars can reflect on the role history plays in making categories of contemporary debate appear inevitable, natural, or culturally necessary; and to publish work that calls into question certainties about the relationship between past and present that are taken for granted by the majority of practicing historians. Read more about the journal in our editor interview.

The Romanic Review is a journal devoted to the study of Romance literatures. Founded in 1910 by Henry Alfred Todd, it covers all periods of French, Italian, and Ibero-Romance languages and literature, and it welcomes a broad diversity of critical approaches. It is edited by Elisabeth Ladenson and published by the Department of French and Romance Philology at Columbia University in cooperation with the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures and the Department of Italian.

A Decade of Duke University Press

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As we enter a new decade, we thought it would be interesting to take a look back at what was happening at Duke University Press ten years ago, in 2010, and consider how we plan to move forward in the 2020s.

Director of Duke University Press in 2010: Steve Cohn
Director in 2019: Dean Smith

We are excited to be starting a new decade at the Press with a new director. After serving as director for twenty-five years, Steve Cohn retired in June 2019 and Dean Smith took over our helm. Dean plans to continue our commitment to open access, deepen our partnerships with other units on campus, develop new products and business models, and expand into new subject areas.

Number of Employees
2010: 93
2019: 120

As we expand the number of books and journals we publish, we need more staff to acquire, edit, produce, and market our products. We’ve also been expanding our efforts to become a more inclusive workplace through the efforts of our Equity and Inclusion group. In 2019 over half our staff participated in initiatives sponsored by that group. Think you’d make a great addition to our team? Check out our job openings.

Number of Books Published
2010: 120
2019: 140

We’ve increased the number of titles we publish each year and expect to continue expanding as we enlarge our editorial team with a new Editorial Director in 2020.

Bestselling Books

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2010: African Rhythms: The Autobiography of Randy Weston
It’s bittersweet to revisit our bestselling title of 2010, as jazz great Randy Weston passed away in 2018. Booklist called his autobiography “a moving testament to a life well lived.”

Living a Feminist Life2019: Living a Feminist Life by Sara Ahmed
Our bestselling book of 2019 is also our bestselling book of the decade. Living a Feminist Life was called “an instant classic” by Bitch Magazine. And check out Sara Ahmed’s latest book What’s the Use?, published this October.

Top Selling Books of the Decade

Living a Feminist Life by Sara Ahmed
Staying with the Trouble by Donna Haraway
Vibrant Matter by Jane Bennett
The Mexico Reader edited by Gilbert M. Joseph and Timothy J. Henderson
Cruel Optimism by Lauren Berlant
The Affect Theory Reader edited by Melissa Gregg and Gregory J. Seigworth
The Queer Art of Failure by Jack Halberstam
Liquidated by Karen Ho
The Cuba Reader edited by Aviva Chomsky, Barry Carr, Alfredo Prieto, and Pamela Maria Smorkaloff
Meeting the Universe Halfway by Karen Barad

Number of Open-Access Books
2010: 0
2019: 80+

We are pleased to participate in several open access programs, including TOME (where we have more open-access titles than any other university press) and Knowledge Unlatched. You can find most of our open access books on the OAPEN platform.

Number of Open-Access Journals

2010: 0
2019: 2

Our efforts to make scholarship widely available also include the publication of two fully open-access journals: Critical Times: Interventions in Global Critical Theory and Environmental Humanities.

Number of Journals Published

2010: 40
2019: 54

In 2020, we look forward to adding two more journals to our publishing program: History of the Present: A Journal of Critical History and the Romanic Review. We’ve enjoyed expanding our list in subject areas including Asian studies, gender and feminist studies, language and literature, mathematics, and more.

Most Popular Articles on Social Media

Published in 2010: “Creaky Voice: A New Feminine Voice Quality for Young Urban-Oriented Upwardly Mobile American Women?” by Ikuko Patricia Yuasa, American Speech 85:3

Published in 2019: “The Trump Effect: Postinauguration Changes in Marketplace Enrollment” by David Anderson and Paul Shafer, Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 44:5

Social Media

Twitter (@DukePress) Followers
2010: 3200
2019: 33,800

Facebook (Duke University Press) Page Followers
2010: 1000
2019: 12,828

Social Media was still pretty new in 2010, but the Press has been on Twitter since 2008 and Facebook since 2007. Over the decade we’ve added presences on YouTube, Pinterest, and Instagram. Please join us on all these sites!

In the next decade, we will celebrate our centennial (2026) and we look forward to continuing our work publishing bold, progressive scholarship for many more decades.

Our Editors Pick Their Books of the Decade

As we come to the end of a decade, our editors look back at some of the most influential books we’ve published since 2010.

Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director

In the WakeI’m proud to have worked on a great number of field-changing and prize-winning books this decade, many of which had sway far beyond the academy. The one title that stands out for me is Christina Sharpe’s In the Wake. I’d worked with Christina on her exceptional first book Monstrous Intimacies so knew there was more brilliance to come. I can still picture the room at MLA in Vancouver where I first heard her present In the Wake’s powerful poetic text, compelling at so many layers at once. We were awed by her ability to move from the deeply familial and personal to the scale of world history without losing either the tone or the theory; by the stark realism of her account of Black death; and by the call to live on despite the weather. The book came out in November of 2016, by mid-March of the following year, artist Cauleen Smith had adopted the book’s title for her contribution to the 2017 Whitney Biennial.  I’ve since seen Sharpe’s work deeply engaged by Torkwase Dyson and other artists. Her narrating of the wake, the ship, the hold, and the weather — along with the idea of wakework itself — has been taken up by writers, critics, activists and readers, who felt Sharpe had named something for their lives. This quick recognition —the sense of being recognized, seen, or heard — is unusual and deeply special.  The book is an extraordinary gift to our ongoing political moment, one that will resonate for many years to come.

Courtney Berger, Executive Editor

Vibrant MatterIt’s been 10 years since we published Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things (January 2010).  When I first read the manuscript, I knew it would be important. I knew that Bennett’s generous and reflective way of thinking and her engaging writing style would widen its audience beyond political theory (Bennett’s home discipline). But I had no idea how influential the book would be, setting the stage for a decade of conversation and debate about “thing-power” and the agential capacities of the nonhuman. Bennett’s plea to recognize the influence of nonhuman forces and things in the political realm and to decenter the human resonated with me and many others seeking new ways of thinking about our relationship to our environment. Influential books often provoke debate and this one certainly has done that. But, for me, the books that matter in the long run are the ones that invite me to think with them. Vibrant Matter is that kind of book. Bennett’s ideas have generated critique, disagreement, and reflection, all of which has pushed scholarship in new and important directions.  Notably, Mel Chen’s Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect (2012) builds upon Bennett’s attention to the affective dimensions of the nonhuman material world, but shows us how race, sexuality, and disability have shaped our notions of liveliness and of who and what matters in this world.  In The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century (2017) Kyla Schuller extends this critique, illustrating how the 19th century sciences of “impressibility” and animacy helped to solidify ontologies of racial difference, ideas that have had an often unacknowledged afterlife in new materialist philosophies.  Moreover, Bennett’s work has helped to lay the ground work for innovative book series like ANIMA, edited by Mel Chen and Jasbir Puar, which brings queer, race, and disability theory to bear on our understanding of life and matter, and Elements, edited by Stacy Alaimo and Nicole Starosielski, which foregrounds the material elements as lively forces that shape politics and culture.

My task was to name one book of the decade, and as you see, instead I named one book, and two more, and then two book series. Maybe that’s my way of dodging the task. But it also speaks to the expansive and generative quality of books, as they travel, intersect, and influence one another, as well as the vibrancy of the scholarly conversations I’m so privileged to be a part of. I can’t wait to see which books make their mark in the coming decade. . . .

Gisela Fosado, Editor

Light in the DarkGloria Anzaldúa’s brilliant book Light in the Dark/Luz en lo Oscuro is a work that is decades ahead of its time.  Published in 2015, but written before Anzaldúa’s untimely death in 2004, the book engages feminist and queer aesthetics, ontologies, epistemologies, and ethics, offering a new decolonial vision for our world.  It’s a must-read for all feminist scholars.

Elizabeth Ault, Editor

My book of the decade is Kristin Peterson’s Speculative Markets. I arrived at Duke Press in 2012, mere weeks after Speculative Marketsdefending my dissertation in American studies (focused on Black-cast sitcoms of the 1970s). I was pretty burnt out after 6 years of grad school, and feeling a little distant and alienated from the political passion and the joy of intellectual inquiry that had put me on an academic path in the first place. Speculative Markets was one of the first books I got to work on at the Press. Peterson’s book, an ethnography of pharmaceuticals in Nigeria, wasn’t an obvious fit with my areas of expertise. But the book begins with a blistering account of structural adjustment in the global 1970s and 80s, providing African perspectives on the global rise of neoliberalism, which had loomed large in my previous work. Thinking neoliberalism, the durability of colonial forms, speculation, and global anti-Blackness from Nigeria with Peterson introduced me to what cultural and medical anthropology and African studies can do. The book reoriented my perspective, introduced me to new conversations, and reminded me of the power of scholarship. It’s helped me chart the course that has comprised my career here at the Press over the past 7 years, which is why it’s my book of the decade.

Miriam Angress, Associate Editor

RemnantsOne of the books I’m joyful to have worked on is Remnants: A Memoir of Spirit, Activism, and Mothering, written by Rosemarie Freeney Harding with her daughter Rachel Elizabeth Harding. The author—an influential civil-rights activist—believed in the unity of all great spiritual teachings, and practiced multiple religions herself; she looked for the compassionate underpinnings of these traditions, such as the link she saw between Tibetan Buddhist teachings and lessons she learned from her mother as they visited dying relatives. Remnants incorporates stories of her civil rights leadership, co-founding an early integrated community center in Atlanta with her husband Dr. Vincent Harding, and working with friends and colleagues including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King, Anne Braden, Dr. Howard Thurman and Sue Bailey Thurman, and Sweet Honey in the Rock singer Bernice Reagon.

Rachel Harding (Associate Professor of Indigenous Spiritual Traditions at University of Colorado) worked with her mother on the memoir for a decade before Freeney Harding’s death in 2004. After that, she excavated her mother’s voice from journals, previously published material, recordings, and her own memories.

Sandra Korn, Assistant Editor

Normal Life2011 was the year I realized that I was queer, and the year that I officially scrapped my parents’ dreams that I would become a scientist, when I switched my undergraduate major to Women, Gender, and Sexuality studies. It’s also the year that Dean Spade first published Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of Law with South End Press. Same-sex marriage legalization and hate crime laws covering gender identity were slowly sweeping the U.S. state by state. Yet Dean Spade taught me that waiting for the courts to grant legal equality (the model adopted by the gay and lesbian rights movement) would never be sufficient to address the root causes of violence against trans people across the planet. Instead, Spade argues that trans liberation requires a grassroots movement, led by trans people most impacted by criminalization, surveillance, and detention and deportation. Duke Press published the second edition of Normal Life in 2015, and this book feels just as necessary as we head into 2020.

 

 

Save 40% During Our Cyber Monday Sale

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Today only! Save 40% on all in-stock books and journal issues during our special one-day-only Cyber Monday sale.

To get the discount, shop our website and enter the coupon code CYBER40 when you check out. Please note that the discount does not apply to journal subscriptions or society memberships. See all the fine print here.

Stock up on books for next semester’s courses or get your holiday shopping done. Books ordered today will arrive in time for Hannukah and Christmas if shipped to a U.S. address. We cannot guarantee holiday arrival for international shipments.

But act fast, because this sale is over at 11:59 PM EST.

Author Events in December

During the first half of December, you can catch your favorite Duke University Press author at various locales across the US and Australia. And since books make great gifts, you can pick up signed copies at these events.

December 1: Marsha Gordon, co-editor of Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film presents a selection of short 16mm films from the 1960s and ʼ70s engaged with the topic of race at the North Carolina Museum of Art.
2:00pm, East Building, SECU Auditorium, 2110 Blue Ridge Rd, Raleigh, NC 27607

December 3: Grand Central Library will host a book talk with Robert Christgau, author of Book Reports.
6:00pm, 135 E 46th St, New York, NY 10017

December 4: Nicholas Boggs will read from James Baldwin’s Little Man, Little Man, which he edited, at The Studios of Key West.
6:00pm, 533 Eaton St, Key West, FL 33040

December 5: Sacred Men author Keith L. Camacho will talk about his book at Asian/Pacific/American Institute moderated by fellow Duke University Press author Dean Saranillio.
6:30pm, 8 Washington Mews, New York, NY 10003

December 5: See E. Patrick Johnson present his latest book Honeypot at Women and Children First.
7:00pm, 5233 N. Clark St, Chicago, IL 60640

December 5: Australian National University will host a keynote lecture from What’s the Use? author Sara Ahmed.
5:30pm, Bldg 188, Fellows Lane, Australian Centre on China in the World, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia

December 7: Honeypot author E. Patrick Johnson will discuss his new book in conversation with Dr. Beverly Guy-Sheftall at Charis Books.
7:30pm, 184 S. Candler St, Decatur, GA 30030

December 10: Love, H. author Hettie Jones will give a lecture at The Cooper Union.
7:00pm, Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Ave. between 6th and 7th Streets) New York, NY 10008

December 12: Allan Gurganus will read his beloved story “A Fool for Christmas” at The Regulator Bookshop. We are distributing a new limited edition of the story with Horse & Buggy Press and the Duke University Libraries.
7:00pm, 720 9th St, Durham, NC 27705

We look forward to seeing you at these exciting events taking place throughout December!

Preview Our Spring 2020 Catalog

S20-catalog-coverWe’re excited to unveil our Spring 2020 catalog. Check out some highlights from the season below and then download a copy for a closer read. These titles will be published between January and July 2020.

On the cover we’re featuring a portrait of writer and activist Margaret Randall, whose memoir I Never Left Home is on page one. Randall is the author of over 150 books of poetry and prose and she has lived a remarkable life that included harrowing escapes from a Mexican government crackdown, life among revolutionaries in Nicaragua and Cuba, and fighting the U.S. government after they attempted to take away her citizenship.

DubWe are publishing several books that straddle the line between poetry and scholarship. We’re pleased to welcome back returning authors David Grubbs and Alexis Pauline Gumbs. Grubbs’s The Voice in the Headphones is an experiment in music writing in the form of a long poem centered on the culture of the recording studio. Gumbs offers the final book in her trilogy (begun with Spill and continued with M Archive): Dub: Finding Ceremony, which takes inspiration from theorist Sylvia Wynter, dub poetry, and ocean life to offer a catalog of possible methods for remembering, healing, listening, and living otherwise. And Ashon T. Crawley’s The Lonely Letters is an epistolary blackqueer critique of the normative world in which he meditates on the interrelation of blackqueer life, sounds of the black church, theology, mysticism, and the potential for platonic and erotic connection in a world that conspires against blackqueer life.

Every Day I Write the BookWe’re also pleased to welcome back returning author Amitava Kumar. Fresh off the tremendous success of his novel Immigrant, Montana (Alfred A. Knopf), Kumar’s Every Day I Write the Book offers academics and all writers advice on style and process as well as inspiring examples from conversations with novelists and other writers.

Since we published the English translation of German novelist Peter Weiss’s The Aesthetics of Resistance, Volume 1 in 2005, readers have been asking us when they could get Volume 2. The wait is over! Volume 2 will be out in March. And Volume 3 is under contract with a translator, so we hope to have the whole trilogy available in English in the next few years. The novel is one of the truly great works of postwar German literature and an essential resource for understanding twentieth-century German history.

Influx and EffluxOther returning authors include photographer William Craft Brumfield, whose new book Journeys through the Russian Empire juxtaposes his own contemporary photographs alongside those of nineteenth-century photographer Sergey Prokudin Gorsky. Jane Bennett, whose Vibrant Matter (2010) is one of our bestselling books of all time, returns with Influx and Efflux, which draws on Walt Whitman and other writers to explore the question of human agency amidst a world teeming with powerful nonhuman influences. Anthropologist Arturo Escobar’s new book Pluriversal Politics continues his work in Designs for the Pluriverse (2018), showing how the key to addressing planetary crises is the creation of the pluriverse—a world of many epistemological and ontological worlds.

RelationsOther notable anthropology titles include Relations, by Marilyn Strathern, which provides a critical account of this key concept and its usage and significance in the English-speaking world. Porkopolis by Alex Blanchette explores how the daily lives of a Midwestern town that is home to a massive pork complex were reorganized around the life and death cycles of pigs while using the factory farm as a way to detail the state of contemporary American industrial capitalism. And in Writing Anthropology, editor Carole McGranahan brings together fifty-two anthropologists to reflect on scholarly writing as both craft and commitment.

You’ll also want to check out Poor Queer Studies, in which Matt Brim shows how queer studies also takes place beyond the halls of flagship institutions: in night school; after a three-hour commute; in overflowing classrooms at no-name colleges; with no research budget; without access to decent food; with kids in tow; in a state of homelessness. And in A People’s History of Detroit, Mark Jay and Philip Conklin use a class framework to tell a sweeping story of Detroit from 1913 to the present, embedding Motown’s history in a global economic context.

tsq_7_2_prAnd don’t miss the exceptional journal issues in this catalog. To name a few: “Radical Care,” upcoming from Social Text, draws on a historical trajectory of feminist, queer, and black activism to consider how communities receive and provide care in order to survive environments that challenge their existence. “Trans Pornography,” an issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly offers insight into a largely neglected topic from both scholars and industry insiders. And “Revolutionary Positions,” a Radical History Review issue, explores the impact of the Cuban Revolution through the lens of sexuality and gender.

There’s so much more! We invite you to download the entire catalog and check out all the great books and journals inside. And be sure to sign up for our email alerts so you’ll know when titles you’re interested in are available.

Black Sacred Music Archive Now Available

We are excited to announce the digitization of Black Sacred Music: A Journal of Theomusicology, published semiannually from 1987 to 1995 and now available online for the first time.

Subscribe now for access, or ask your library to purchase the archive.

Black Sacred Music, under the editorship of Yahya Jontingaba (formerly known as Jon Michael Spencer), sought to establish theomusicology—a theologically informed musicology—as a distinct discipline, incorporating methods from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and philosophy to examine the full range of black sacred music. Topics included the theology of American pop, the early days of rap, the African church, spirituals, gospel music, civil rights songs, and much more.

The journal consisted of scholarly articles, essays, hymns and folk songs, sermons, historical reprints, and reviews of books, hymn books, and recordings. It also published volumes of archival writings by R. Nathaniel Dett, William Grant Still, and Willis Laurence James.

Notable contributors include Philip V. Bohlman, Michael Eric Dyson, Andrew Greeley, Mark Sumner Harvey, Willie James Jennings, D. Soyini Madison, Sonja Peterson-Lewis, Harold Dean Trulear, William C. Turner Jr., Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu, Cornel West, and Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.

Now Available: Syllabi from Duke University Press

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In the spirit of University Press Week’s “Read. Think. Act.” theme, we’re thrilled to unveil a project that our team has been working on for months: staff-curated syllabi of incisive work on some of today’s most critical issues.

All journal articles and issues in these syllabi are freely available online until September 30, 2020. And you can save 40% on featured books and journal issues through the end of 2019 using coupon code SYLLABI at dukeupress.edu.

Our team at the Press sees scholarship as a powerful basis for understanding our current sociopolitical climate and working toward a brighter future. We encourage you to read and share the content we’ve selected, and we hope you find it valuable in preparing courses.

University Press Week 2019: Read. Think. Act.

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It’s University Press Week! University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society. We’ll be celebrating with displays at the Durham County Library’s South Regional branch, the LGBTQ Center of DurhamNorth Carolina Central University, Durham’s Riverside High School library, and around Duke University’s campus at the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Music Library, the Office for Faculty Advancement, the John Hope Franklin Center, the Forum for Scholars and Publics, the Rubenstein Arts Center, the Center for Muslim Life,  the Center for Documentary Studies, and the Sarah P. Duke Gardens. If you’re in Durham please stop by and check out some of our recent titles and pick up a bookmark.

This year’s University Press Week theme is “Read. Think. Act.” It’s is a particularly apt theme as many citizens around the globe continue to engage in important debates that will influence vital decision-making in the months ahead; in fact, this year’s UP Week will begin exactly one year to the day before the 2020 Election Day in the U.S. Through this positive theme AUPresses members worldwide seek to encourage people to read the latest peer-reviewed publications about issues that affect our present and future—from politics to economics to climate change to race relations and more—and to better understand academic presses’ important contribution to these vital areas of concern. To that end, AUPresses members have suggested a “Read. Think. Act. Reading List” that can serve as a starting place for any reader who wants to learn more. Our contribution to that list is Sea Level Rise: A Slow Tsumani on America’s Shores, by Orrin H. Pilkey and Keith C. Pilkey, who argue that the only feasible response to climate change along much of the US shoreline is an immediate and managed retreat.

A blog tour has been set up to highlight university press books, authors, and editors that fit the “Read. Think. Act.” theme. Today’s tour features presses blogging about “how to be a better (global) citizen.” Participating presses are University of California Press, University of Virginia Press, Purdue University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Wisconsin Press, Manchester University Press, University Press of Florida, and University of Minnesota Press. Check out their posts today and come back here Wednesday, when several of our authors and editors will be participating in a roundtable about the global climate crisis.

Please share your love for university presses and all they do for scholarship on social media this week with the hashtag #ReadUP.

Author Events in November

978-1-4780-0401-1.jpgCome in from the chilly weather and to see one of our authors at events throughout the month. November is also our busiest conference month of the year. If you’re attending the American Studies Association, the African Studies Association, the American Anthropological Association, the National Women’s Studies Association, or the American Academy of Religion conferences, be sure to stop by our booths and pick up copies of our latest titles at great conference prices.

November 1: The Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU will celebrate the release of A Nation on the Line by Jan Padios and Insurgent Aesthetics by Ronak K. Kapadia.
5:00pm, 20 Cooper Square, 4th floor, New York, NY 10003

November 1: Leo Ching will speak at the Franklin Humanities Institute about his book Anti-Japan.
9:30am, 114 South Buchanan Blvd, Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, C105, Durham, NC 27708

November 1: Written in Stone author Sanford Levinson will give a keynote at the Kentucky Law Journal Annual Symposium.
8:00am, University of Kentucky College of Law, 620 S. Limestone, Lexington, KY 40508

November 2: The Louisiana Book Festival will host a book talk for Matt Sakakeeny’s Remaking New Orleans.
12:00pm, State Capitol Building, House Committee Rm 4701, 900 North 3rd St., Baton Rouge, LA 70802

November 4: How Art Can Be Thought author Allan DeSouza will be in conversation with Ugochukwu-Smooth C. Nzewi at CUNY The Graduate Center.
6:30pm, 365 Fifth Avenue, 9100: Skylight Room, New York, NY 10016

November 4: Alex Blanchette discusses his forthcoming book Porkopolis (May 2020) at Duke University’s Cultural Anthropology department.
1:30pm, Friedl Building 225, Durham, NC 27708

November 5: Alexis Pauline Gumbs, author of the poetry trilogy composed of Spill, M Archive, and Dub (out in January) will give a lecture at The Cooper Union.
7:00pm, Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets), New York, NY 10003

November 8: Gay’s The Word will host a book launch for Sara Ahmed’s new book What’s the Use?
7:00pm, 66 Marchmont Street, WC1N 1AB London, United Kingdom

November 11: E. Patrick Johnson will discuss his new book Honeypot at Busboys and Poets. Look for a post about all Johnson’s upcoming events next week on the blog.
6:00pm, 14th & V, 2021 14th St. NW, Washington, District of Columbia, 20009

November 15: Les Créatives will host What’s the Use? author Sara Ahmed and French writer Rebecca Amsellem.
6:30pm, Rue des Savoises 15, 1205 Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

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November 18: Insurgent Aesthetics author Ronak Kapadia will speak at the Berkeley Center for New Media.
12:30pm, UC Berkeley, 340 Moffitt Undergraduate Library

November 19: See Progressive Dystopia author Savannah Shange in conversation with Patrick Camangian at City Lights Bookstore.
7:00pm, 261 Columbus Avenue at Broadway, San Francisco, CA 94133

November 19: Amherst Books will host a book talk with Honeypot author E. Patrick Johnson.
7:00pm, 8 Main Street Amherst, MA 01002

November 19: The Franklin Humanities Institute will host a panel on Charles Piot’s The Fixer.
10:00am, Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse, 114 S. Buchanan Blvd, Durham, NC 27708

November 20: See Ana María Reyes discuss her new book The Politics of Taste at The Block Museum.
7:00pm, 40 Arts Circle Dr, Evanston, IL 60208

November 21: Eliza Steinbock speaks about their new book Shimmering Images at Oxford University.
11:00am, Mure Room, Merton College, Merton Street, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK

November 23: Bureau of General Services Queer Division will host a book talk with Queering Black Atlantic Religions author Roberto Strongman.
7:00pm, 208 W 13th St #210, New York, NY 10011