Press News

Preview Our Spring 2020 Catalog

S20-catalog-coverWe’re excited to unveil our Spring 2020 catalog. Check out some highlights from the season below and then download a copy for a closer read. These titles will be published between January and July 2020.

On the cover we’re featuring a portrait of writer and activist Margaret Randall, whose memoir I Never Left Home is on page one. Randall is the author of over 150 books of poetry and prose and she has lived a remarkable life that included harrowing escapes from a Mexican government crackdown, life among revolutionaries in Nicaragua and Cuba, and fighting the U.S. government after they attempted to take away her citizenship.

DubWe are publishing several books that straddle the line between poetry and scholarship. We’re pleased to welcome back returning authors David Grubbs and Alexis Pauline Gumbs. Grubbs’s The Voice in the Headphones is an experiment in music writing in the form of a long poem centered on the culture of the recording studio. Gumbs offers the final book in her trilogy (begun with Spill and continued with M Archive): Dub: Finding Ceremony, which takes inspiration from theorist Sylvia Wynter, dub poetry, and ocean life to offer a catalog of possible methods for remembering, healing, listening, and living otherwise. And Ashon T. Crawley’s The Lonely Letters is an epistolary blackqueer critique of the normative world in which he meditates on the interrelation of blackqueer life, sounds of the black church, theology, mysticism, and the potential for platonic and erotic connection in a world that conspires against blackqueer life.

Every Day I Write the BookWe’re also pleased to welcome back returning author Amitava Kumar. Fresh off the tremendous success of his novel Immigrant, Montana (Alfred A. Knopf), Kumar’s Every Day I Write the Book offers academics and all writers advice on style and process as well as inspiring examples from conversations with novelists and other writers.

Since we published the English translation of German novelist Peter Weiss’s The Aesthetics of Resistance, Volume 1 in 2005, readers have been asking us when they could get Volume 2. The wait is over! Volume 2 will be out in March. And Volume 3 is under contract with a translator, so we hope to have the whole trilogy available in English in the next few years. The novel is one of the truly great works of postwar German literature and an essential resource for understanding twentieth-century German history.

Influx and EffluxOther returning authors include photographer William Craft Brumfield, whose new book Journeys through the Russian Empire juxtaposes his own contemporary photographs alongside those of nineteenth-century photographer Sergey Prokudin Gorsky. Jane Bennett, whose Vibrant Matter (2010) is one of our bestselling books of all time, returns with Influx and Efflux, which draws on Walt Whitman and other writers to explore the question of human agency amidst a world teeming with powerful nonhuman influences. Anthropologist Arturo Escobar’s new book Pluriversal Politics continues his work in Designs for the Pluriverse (2018), showing how the key to addressing planetary crises is the creation of the pluriverse—a world of many epistemological and ontological worlds.

RelationsOther notable anthropology titles include Relations, by Marilyn Strathern, which provides a critical account of this key concept and its usage and significance in the English-speaking world. Porkopolis by Alex Blanchette explores how the daily lives of a Midwestern town that is home to a massive pork complex were reorganized around the life and death cycles of pigs while using the factory farm as a way to detail the state of contemporary American industrial capitalism. And in Writing Anthropology, editor Carole McGranahan brings together fifty-two anthropologists to reflect on scholarly writing as both craft and commitment.

You’ll also want to check out Poor Queer Studies, in which Matt Brim shows how queer studies also takes place beyond the halls of flagship institutions: in night school; after a three-hour commute; in overflowing classrooms at no-name colleges; with no research budget; without access to decent food; with kids in tow; in a state of homelessness. And in A People’s History of Detroit, Mark Jay and Philip Conklin use a class framework to tell a sweeping story of Detroit from 1913 to the present, embedding Motown’s history in a global economic context.

tsq_7_2_prAnd don’t miss the exceptional journal issues in this catalog. To name a few: “Radical Care,” upcoming from Social Text, draws on a historical trajectory of feminist, queer, and black activism to consider how communities receive and provide care in order to survive environments that challenge their existence. “Trans Pornography,” an issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly offers insight into a largely neglected topic from both scholars and industry insiders. And “Revolutionary Positions,” a Radical History Review issue, explores the impact of the Cuban Revolution through the lens of sexuality and gender.

There’s so much more! We invite you to download the entire catalog and check out all the great books and journals inside. And be sure to sign up for our email alerts so you’ll know when titles you’re interested in are available.

Black Sacred Music Archive Now Available

We are excited to announce the digitization of Black Sacred Music: A Journal of Theomusicology, published semiannually from 1987 to 1995 and now available online for the first time.

Subscribe now for access, or ask your library to purchase the archive.

Black Sacred Music, under the editorship of Yahya Jontingaba (formerly known as Jon Michael Spencer), sought to establish theomusicology—a theologically informed musicology—as a distinct discipline, incorporating methods from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and philosophy to examine the full range of black sacred music. Topics included the theology of American pop, the early days of rap, the African church, spirituals, gospel music, civil rights songs, and much more.

The journal consisted of scholarly articles, essays, hymns and folk songs, sermons, historical reprints, and reviews of books, hymn books, and recordings. It also published volumes of archival writings by R. Nathaniel Dett, William Grant Still, and Willis Laurence James.

Notable contributors include Philip V. Bohlman, Michael Eric Dyson, Andrew Greeley, Mark Sumner Harvey, Willie James Jennings, D. Soyini Madison, Sonja Peterson-Lewis, Harold Dean Trulear, William C. Turner Jr., Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu, Cornel West, and Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.

Now Available: Syllabi from Duke University Press

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In the spirit of University Press Week’s “Read. Think. Act.” theme, we’re thrilled to unveil a project that our team has been working on for months: staff-curated syllabi of incisive work on some of today’s most critical issues.

All journal articles and issues in these syllabi are freely available online until September 30, 2020. And you can save 40% on featured books and journal issues through the end of 2019 using coupon code SYLLABI at dukeupress.edu.

Our team at the Press sees scholarship as a powerful basis for understanding our current sociopolitical climate and working toward a brighter future. We encourage you to read and share the content we’ve selected, and we hope you find it valuable in preparing courses.

University Press Week 2019: Read. Think. Act.

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It’s University Press Week! University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society. We’ll be celebrating with displays at the Durham County Library’s South Regional branch, the LGBTQ Center of DurhamNorth Carolina Central University, Durham’s Riverside High School library, and around Duke University’s campus at the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Music Library, the Office for Faculty Advancement, the John Hope Franklin Center, the Forum for Scholars and Publics, the Rubenstein Arts Center, the Center for Muslim Life,  the Center for Documentary Studies, and the Sarah P. Duke Gardens. If you’re in Durham please stop by and check out some of our recent titles and pick up a bookmark.

This year’s University Press Week theme is “Read. Think. Act.” It’s is a particularly apt theme as many citizens around the globe continue to engage in important debates that will influence vital decision-making in the months ahead; in fact, this year’s UP Week will begin exactly one year to the day before the 2020 Election Day in the U.S. Through this positive theme AUPresses members worldwide seek to encourage people to read the latest peer-reviewed publications about issues that affect our present and future—from politics to economics to climate change to race relations and more—and to better understand academic presses’ important contribution to these vital areas of concern. To that end, AUPresses members have suggested a “Read. Think. Act. Reading List” that can serve as a starting place for any reader who wants to learn more. Our contribution to that list is Sea Level Rise: A Slow Tsumani on America’s Shores, by Orrin H. Pilkey and Keith C. Pilkey, who argue that the only feasible response to climate change along much of the US shoreline is an immediate and managed retreat.

A blog tour has been set up to highlight university press books, authors, and editors that fit the “Read. Think. Act.” theme. Today’s tour features presses blogging about “how to be a better (global) citizen.” Participating presses are University of California Press, University of Virginia Press, Purdue University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Wisconsin Press, Manchester University Press, University Press of Florida, and University of Minnesota Press. Check out their posts today and come back here Wednesday, when several of our authors and editors will be participating in a roundtable about the global climate crisis.

Please share your love for university presses and all they do for scholarship on social media this week with the hashtag #ReadUP.

Author Events in November

978-1-4780-0401-1.jpgCome in from the chilly weather and to see one of our authors at events throughout the month. November is also our busiest conference month of the year. If you’re attending the American Studies Association, the African Studies Association, the American Anthropological Association, the National Women’s Studies Association, or the American Academy of Religion conferences, be sure to stop by our booths and pick up copies of our latest titles at great conference prices.

November 1: The Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU will celebrate the release of A Nation on the Line by Jan Padios and Insurgent Aesthetics by Ronak K. Kapadia.
5:00pm, 20 Cooper Square, 4th floor, New York, NY 10003

November 1: Leo Ching will speak at the Franklin Humanities Institute about his book Anti-Japan.
9:30am, 114 South Buchanan Blvd, Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, C105, Durham, NC 27708

November 1: Written in Stone author Sanford Levinson will give a keynote at the Kentucky Law Journal Annual Symposium.
8:00am, University of Kentucky College of Law, 620 S. Limestone, Lexington, KY 40508

November 2: The Louisiana Book Festival will host a book talk for Matt Sakakeeny’s Remaking New Orleans.
12:00pm, State Capitol Building, House Committee Rm 4701, 900 North 3rd St., Baton Rouge, LA 70802

November 4: How Art Can Be Thought author Allan DeSouza will be in conversation with Ugochukwu-Smooth C. Nzewi at CUNY The Graduate Center.
6:30pm, 365 Fifth Avenue, 9100: Skylight Room, New York, NY 10016

November 4: Alex Blanchette discusses his forthcoming book Porkopolis (May 2020) at Duke University’s Cultural Anthropology department.
1:30pm, Friedl Building 225, Durham, NC 27708

November 5: Alexis Pauline Gumbs, author of the poetry trilogy composed of Spill, M Archive, and Dub (out in January) will give a lecture at The Cooper Union.
7:00pm, Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets), New York, NY 10003

November 8: Gay’s The Word will host a book launch for Sara Ahmed’s new book What’s the Use?
7:00pm, 66 Marchmont Street, WC1N 1AB London, United Kingdom

November 11: E. Patrick Johnson will discuss his new book Honeypot at Busboys and Poets. Look for a post about all Johnson’s upcoming events next week on the blog.
6:00pm, 14th & V, 2021 14th St. NW, Washington, District of Columbia, 20009

November 15: Les Créatives will host What’s the Use? author Sara Ahmed and French writer Rebecca Amsellem.
6:30pm, Rue des Savoises 15, 1205 Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

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November 18: Insurgent Aesthetics author Ronak Kapadia will speak at the Berkeley Center for New Media.
12:30pm, UC Berkeley, 340 Moffitt Undergraduate Library

November 19: See Progressive Dystopia author Savannah Shange in conversation with Patrick Camangian at City Lights Bookstore.
7:00pm, 261 Columbus Avenue at Broadway, San Francisco, CA 94133

November 19: Amherst Books will host a book talk with Honeypot author E. Patrick Johnson.
7:00pm, 8 Main Street Amherst, MA 01002

November 19: The Franklin Humanities Institute will host a panel on Charles Piot’s The Fixer.
10:00am, Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse, 114 S. Buchanan Blvd, Durham, NC 27708

November 20: See Ana María Reyes discuss her new book The Politics of Taste at The Block Museum.
7:00pm, 40 Arts Circle Dr, Evanston, IL 60208

November 21: Eliza Steinbock speaks about their new book Shimmering Images at Oxford University.
11:00am, Mure Room, Merton College, Merton Street, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK

November 23: Bureau of General Services Queer Division will host a book talk with Queering Black Atlantic Religions author Roberto Strongman.
7:00pm, 208 W 13th St #210, New York, NY 10011

Open Access Resources Available from Duke University Press

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It’s Open Access Week, a global opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. Duke University Press offers a variety of books, journals, and online collections in an open access format. To learn more about why we consider participating in these initiatives so important, read an interview with our previous director Steve Cohn from last year’s Open Access Week. This year we’re pleased to share some of our open access offerings.

Books

Duke University Press participates in two open access programs to make some of our books available in an open access format: Knowledge Unlatched and TOME. Each year we release about a dozen books that are open access. You may be able to read these books online via your own library. You can also find some of them on Project MUSE, OAPEN, and on our own website. Recent books that are available in an open access format include The News at the Ends of the Earth by Hester Blum, Anti-Japan by Leo T. S. Ching, and The Fixer by Charles Piot. 

Journals

Duke University Press’s journals publishing program offers several open-access journals and e-resources:

coverimage1-1Critical Times: Interventions in Global Critical Theory, a new addition to our program, is an online journal sponsored by the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs with the aim of foregrounding the form and global reach of contemporary critical theory.

Environmental Humanities draws humanities scholarship into conversation with natural and social sciences around significant environmental issues.

The Carlyle Letters Online provides access to an outstanding resource in Victorian literature, philosophy, and culture: the letters of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle.

In addition, many introductions to Duke University Press humanities and social sciences journal issues are available for free at read.dukeupress.edu. We also offer several free or low-cost journal access options to libraries in eligible countries.

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Duke University Press and Cornell University Library also jointly manage Project Euclid, a not-for-profit hosting and publishing platform for the mathematics and statistics communities. About 75% of Project Euclid’s hosted content is open access.

Check out some of our previous blog posts for Open Access Week here.

Sale Recommendations from Our Editors

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If you’re not sure what to buy during our week-long Fall Sale, we’re pleased to present some recommendations from our editors. Today we share suggestions from Editor Elizabeth Ault and Editorial Director Ken Wissoker. Tomorrow look for Executive Editor Courtney Berger’s and Editor Gisela Fosado’s recommendations.

Elizabeth Ault, Editor

Making the World Global I am super-energized following the abolitionist university studies conference held last weekend here at Duke (the second-best thing to happen last week following Bodyminds Reimagined author Sami Schalk’s successful #twerkwithlizzo campaign)! To follow up on the great conversations held there, I highly recommend Isaac Kamola’s Making the World Global and Nathan Snaza’s Animate Literacies. These very different books—Kamola’s on how the concept of “the global university” spread from business schools through every level of higher ed, and Snaza’s on rethinking what we mean by literacy to acknowledge all of the historical and more-than-human forces that shape what and how we read—both help us situate ourselves and our reading, teaching, and studying practices within the historical and spatial contingencies of the universities we do (or don’t!) inhabit.

Other books that are trying to help us reenvision the spaces in which we find ourselves include Justin Izzo’s Experiments with Empire focuses on how experimental writers and ethnographers used the tools of empire and empiricism to imagine solidarities and subjectivities beyond the dyadic frameworks empire sought to impose. And in The Archive of Loss, Maura Finkelstein reconceives of Mumbai’s last remaining textile mill as an archive, full of the stories, affects, aches and pains, of those who have made their livings and their lives there. It’s essential reading for understanding post-industrial melancholy.

CampTVFinally, as the fall television season and all its attendant debates about representation and genre get underway, I recommend revisiting some classic TV through Quinn Miller’s Camp TV, which goes beyond representational critique to imagine the possibilities early television created for queering genders. Or, if you’re missing antiheros among the new crop of shows, check out Angelo Restivo’s Breaking Bad and Cinematic Television, which goes beyond an easy equation of cinema with quality to explore what truly makes television “like the movies,” or Toni Pape’s Figures of Time, which reframes Damages and other early 2000s programs through the lens of preemptive politics.

Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director

It would be difficult (and foolish) not to begin my recommendations with two important books that are both new this month, Sara Ahmed’s What’s the Use: On the Uses of Use and Achille Mbembe’s Necropolitics. Sara Ahmed’s book moves all three of  978-1-4780-0650-3_prher interconnected projects forward at once.  On the face of it a follow-up to The Promise of Happiness and Willfull Subjects, her books which ‘follow words around,’ it also includes much that moves forward from On Being Included on universities and their ways of side-stepping real equality and inclusion, and from Living a Feminist Life with similarly memorable and life-giving recognitions and everyday feminist realities.  Achille Mbembe’s Necropolitics is equally timely and necessary for our lives.  Combining his classic title essay with a translation of his recent politiques de l’inimitié, this is the account we need now of the racist and nationalist state, all-too organized around the right to kill.  A brilliant and useful (that word again) analysis truly needed for our time.

I’m also excited about MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient Julie Livingston’s brand new book, Self-Devouring Growth: A Planetary Parable as Told from Southern Africa. Inspired by Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Livingston take three examples of development that were supposed to lead to a better society — roads, water, and cattle — and shows that as soon as one looks at them from a more transnational perspective, they all make the planet — and the lives of those they were intended to help — worse. It’s a brilliant and engaging analysis of how much modern aid projects have accelerated the anthropocene, however helpful-sounding their infrastructural aims.

Racial MelancholiaEver since its publication last spring, I’ve been proselytizing non-stop for David Eng and Shinhee Han’s Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation: On the Social and Psychic Lives of Asian Americans—the book that we have needed as long as I can remember. A book that puts racialization and it’s effects at the center of the psychoanalytic account—and if psychology is supposed to deal with the constitution of subjects how could that not be central — while still offering a complex and historicized account of cultural and individual lives.  Eng and Han co-wrote it, working on the theory together and using real-life examples from her therapeutic practice. The stories are from Asian Americans and Asians in America, but anyone who thinks about race and personhood in any form will benefit.

I am repeatedly shocked at the bad advice offered to younger scholars, who are told they have to publish in the “right places” or conform to tired disciplinary standards that are busy dying. The last decade has been an open and exciting renaissance moment for intellectual thinking worked through stylish and experimental writing forms. Two leaders in this moment have been Katie Stewart and Lauren Berlant.  Their collaborative work The Hundreds is a masterclass in close attention and eloquent description. I love how Hua Hsu traced its continuity with both authors previous work in his New Yorker essay.  That’s a masterclass too.  In that same brillant direction, the sale is a superb time to be sure one has all three of Fred Moten’s “Consent not to be a single being” trilogy volumes. Widely influential already, they will only become more so.  Finally, I will put in a good word for Benjamin Piekut’s Henry Cow: The World is a Problem which does for the British Marxist post-68 experimental music scene what Tim Lawrence’s work has done for the New York City dance floor, spinning archives and zillions of interviews into a story of musical community, utopic possibilities, and their inevitable limits.

You can get all these books and more for 50% off through Monday, October 21. Use coupon code Fall50 at checkout. See the fine print here.

Congratulations to the 2019 MacArthur Fellows!

Congratulations to the recipients of the 2019 MacArthur “Genius” Grant! We’re proud to count several of this year’s MacArthur Fellows among our journal contributors. In honor of their achievements, we’ve made a selection of their essays freely available through the end of the year.

Saidiya Hartman
The Anarchy of Colored Girls Assembled in a Riotous Manner
South Atlantic Quarterly 117:3, 2018

Sujatha Baliga
The Day the Jail Walls Cracked: A Restorative Plea Deal
Tikkun 27:1, 2012

Annie Dorsen
The Sublime and the Digital Landscape
Theater 48:1, 2018

Jeffrey Alan Miller
“Better, as in the Geneva”: The Role of the Geneva Bible in Drafting the King James Version
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 47:3, 2017

Elizabeth Anderson
Rationality and Freedom
The Philosophical Review 114:2, 2005

A Quarter-Century of Common Knowledge

Congratulations to Common Knowledge on twenty-five years of publication! In honor of the journal’s anniversary, its editors have pulled together a triple-length special issue consisting of outstanding and representative articles, editorial statements, book reviews, poetry, and fiction published over journal’s history.

A Quarter-Century of Common-Knowledge” maps the life of a journal that Susan Sontag called her “favorite” and that Stephen Greenblatt praises as showing “what it means boldly to choose compromise over contention, reconciliation over rejection, civility over strife.”

Contributors to this volume include many of the most controversial and influential thinkers and writers of the turbulent years since the end of the Cold War, among them

  • heads of state and government: Václav Havel, King Michael of Romania, Edward Heath
  • dissidents: Fang Lizhi, Adam Michnik, Sari Nusseibeh
  • imposing literary figures: Alexander Solzhenitsyn, J. M. Coetzee, Wisława Szymborska, Edward Albee, Lydia Davis, Anne Carson, Yusef Komunyakaa, Thom Gunn, Frank Kermode
  • groundbreaking social scientists: Amartya Sen, Marilyn Strathern, Albert O. Hirschman, Julia Kristeva, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro
  • reshapers of religion: Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, Cardinal Roger Etchegaray, Caroline Walker Bynum, Gianni Vattimo, Jack Miles
  • political philosophers: Isaiah Berlin, Bernard Williams, Cornelius Castoriadis, György Konrád
  • theorists of the “linguistic turn”: W. V. Quine, Richard Rorty, Clifford Geertz, Stanley Cavell, Quentin Skinner
  • microhistorians and their critics: Carlo Ginzburg, Natalie Zemon Davis, Keith Thomas, J. H. Elliott
  • key developers of science studies: Bruno Latour, Paul Feyerabend, Ian Hacking, Barbara Herrnstein Smith

Start reading with renowned political economist Albert O. Hirschman’s essay “Self-Subversion,” made freely available through the end of the year, or explore the full contents of this exceptional issue.

Open-Access Journal Critical Times Now Available

We are pleased to announce that Critical Times: Interventions in Global Critical Theory, a new peer-reviewed, open-access journal, is now available to read online. The journal is edited by Samera Esmeir and published by the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs, housed at the University of California, Berkeley.

Critical Times aims to foreground encounters between canonical critical theory and various traditions of critique emerging from other historical legacies, seeking to present the multiple forms that critical thought takes today. The journal publishes essays from different regions of the world in order to foster new paths of intellectual exchange and reformulate the field by accounting for its regional and linguistic inflections.

The newest issue of Critical Times opens with a special section of memorial essays and testimonies on the life, work, and legacy of Saba Mahmood. The issue also features a group of scholarly essays that reflect on the critical situations of universities in South Africa, Chile, India, and Mexico.

Sign up to receive email alerts when new issues are published.

Interested in publishing an article? Critical Times seeks to publish texts that shed light on contemporary practices of authoritarian and neo-fascist politics, nativist and atavistic cultural formations, and forms of economic exclusion, as well as spaces and forms of life where emancipatory social worlds might be imagined, articulated, and pursued. The journal publishes essays, interviews, dialogues, dispatches, visual art, and various other platforms for critical reflection, transnational exchange, and political reflection and practice. For more information on how to submit an article, visit the submission guidelines page.