Press News

Preview our Spring 2019 Catalog

S19-catalog-front-coverOur Spring 2019 catalog is here! Check out some highlights below and download the complete catalog for a more in-depth look. These titles will be published between January and June 2019.

The cover of the catalog is a photograph by Rotimi Fani-Kayode, the subject of the book Bloodflowers: Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Photography, and the 1980s (March) by W. Ian Bourland. Bloodflowers launches a new series, The Visual Arts of Africa and its Diasporas, edited by Kellie Jones and Steven Nelson. And it’s just one of many great new art titles in this catalog. You’ll also want to check out Suzanne Preston Blier’s Picasso’s Demoiselles (June), an examination of the previously unknown origins of a well-known painting. And in Surrealism at Play (February) Susan Laxton writes a new history of Surrealism in which she traces the centrality of play to the movement and its ongoing legacy. We’re especially excited about The Romare Bearden Reader (May) edited by Robert G. O’Meally. It brings together a collection of new essays and canonical writings by novelists, poets, historians, critics, and playwrights. The contributors include Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, August Wilson, Farah Jasmine Griffin, and Kobena Mercer. We’ve also got Rebecca Zorach’s Art for People’s Sake (March), which looks at the Black Arts Movement in Chicago; and Chicano and Chicana Art: A Critical Anthology  (February), which provides an overview of the history and theory of Chicano/a art from the 1960s to the present.

Deported AmericansTimely books on immigration will definitely add context to current debates. In Deported Americans (April), legal scholar and former public defender Beth C. Caldwell tells the story of dozens of immigrants who were deported from the United States—the only country they have ever known—to Mexico, tracking the harmful consequences of deportation for those on both sides of the border. And in The Fixer (June), Charles Piot follows a visa broker—known as a “fixer”—in the West African nation of Togo as he helps his clients apply for the U.S. Diversity Visa Lottery program. For a look at the immigrant experience through poetry, check out The Chasers (May), in which Renato Rosaldo shares his experiences and those of his group of twelve Mexican-American Tucson High School friends known as the Chasers as they grew up, graduated, and fell out of touch. Rosaldo’s poems present a chorus of distinct voices and perspectives that convey the realities of Chicano life on the borderlands from the 1950s to the present.

The Hundreds by Lauren Berlant and Kathleen Stewart will delight fans of theory, ethnography, and experimental writing alike. The book, composed of pieces one hundred or multiples of one hundred words long—is their collaborative experimental writing project in which they strive toward sensing and capturing the resonances that operate at the ordinary level of everyday experience.

Activists will be excited to learn that we are bringing out a new, revised and expanded edition of Aurora Levins Morales’s Medicine Stories (April). She weaves together the insights and lessons learned over a lifetime of activism to offer a new theory of social justice, bringing clarity and hope to tangled, emotionally charged social issues in beautiful and accessible language.

Book ReportsIf you enjoy critic Robert Christgau’s writing on music (his collection Is It Still Good to Ya? came out this fall), you’ll definitely want to check out his book reviews, collected together in Book Reports (April). Christgau shows readers a different side to his esteemed career with reviews of books ranging from musical autobiographies, criticism, and histories to novels, literary memoirs, and cultural theory.

We’re also pleased to present new books from returning authors Jane Gallop, Elspeth Brown, Jennifer C. Nash, and Kandice Chuh, among others, as well as a new edition of The Cuba Reader, long a bestseller for courses and travelers.

These are just a few of the great titles coming out next spring. We have over seventy titles in cultural studies, art, sound studies, Latin American studies, history, Asian studies, African studies, religion, American studies, and more. You’ll want to read and download the whole thing to see all the great new books and journals. To be notified of new books in your chosen disciplines, sign up for our email alerts, too.

 

 

Open Access Week Q&A with Director Steve Cohn

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Today our Director Steve Cohn answers questions in honor of Open Access Week, a global event dedicated to discussion and education about Open Access within the scholarly and research community and to the expansion of access to research and information across disciplines. Steve Cohn got his start in publishing as the managing editor of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, which he brought with him to the Press in 1984 as the Press’s eighth journal (we now publish over fifty), and which the Press continues to publish today. He came to the Press as the Journals Manager, and after building and strengthening that program he became Director in 1993. Steve led the Press back from a period of financial insecurity in the nineties, through the transition from print to digital formats, and through significant growth and expansion of its publishing program.

Why is it important that Duke University Press experiment with Open Access?

Given the way our world is changing—with many librarians, funding agencies, and governments pushing towards a fully open-access publishing environment—we feel it is imperative that we begin experimenting with open-access publishing, even though we see no way for open-access publishing to be feasible (or desirable) on a broad scale for the sort of publishing we are now doing.

Mainly for that reason, but also because we believe that demonstrating ways to publish open-access projects successfully can allow us to attract some excellent projects that we could not otherwise have attracted, we have begun publishing both journals and books in open-access arrangements, in each case insisting that the OA arrangement must be financially sustainable over the long term.

What was the Press’s first venture into OA publishing?

Our longest-running OA project by far is the Carlyle Letters Online (CLO), the electronic database that has mainly superseded the long series of printed volumes (now nearing fifty) that began in 1970 and will continue to be published steadily at the pace one volume per year, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, until we reach the end of this voluminous set of letters from Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle in a few more years.

The CLO is widely considered to be a model “lives and letters” database, much used, much loved, and much imitated. We hope it can soon start to serve as the model and the base for a much wider set of annotated letters, diaries, and other Victorian life-writing.  

What open access initiatives have been most successful for Duke University Press?

In the realm of journals, we have concentrated our open-access efforts on what are alternatively called diamond or platinum models, i.e., models that do not depend on author payments as their source of sustainability. In the areas we publish in primarily—the humanities, the interpretive social sciences, and mathematics—most authors do not have grant funding to cover OA charges, as they do in the sciences; so they would have to pay article fees out of their own pockets.

The model for those efforts is our very successful publication of Environmental Humanities, a journal that is supported through annual contributions of $5,000 each from five academic centers scattered among Australia, Canada, Europe, and the US. (Magazines for Libraries said, “Environmental Humanities is one of the most beautifully realized open access journals I’ve ever had the pleasure of reviewing. This is a title whose URL should be shouted from the rooftops: it’s that good.”)  

This is a model we are promoting for other open-access journals that want to work with us, and we have recently signed an agreement with Judith Butler and the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs for taking on a fledgling journal called Critical Times: Interventions in Global Critical Theory, which we expect will be equally successful.

How do you decide whether to participate in an OA initiative? What are your criteria?

Our criteria for publishing an OA project of any sort are the very same criteria we use for choosing to take on any publishing project: the project must be intellectually significant and it must be financially sustainable. Both our OA books and our OA journals pass through the very same peer-review processes, including final approval by our faculty board, as everything else we publish.

The books we have published in OA form have almost always already been through the approval process long before they are chosen for OA publication. The main OA funding programs for books that we now use—Knowledge Unlatched and TOME—have so far been focused on already-accepted books that are well along in the production process by the time they are chosen for receiving the financial support that will allow the access to be opened up.

But even if we knew from the first that a book would be published OA, we would take it through the same review and approval process; and also we would design, edit, produce, market, and sell it in all the same ways as a book that had no open access.

How do you find ways to make OA book publishing financially sustainable?

So far, we find it impossible to imagine receiving funding that would be sufficient to pay all the costs for our very labor-intensive methods of book publication. Our books are expensive to produce, given the amount of time and care we put into them, and the unlatching amounts provided so far by OA funding sponsors like Knowledge Unlatched and TOME are not nearly sufficient to cover our full publishing costs (including staff time). So, with the exception of a few early and not very successful experiments, all of the books we publish in open access form electronically are also for sale through all our usual sales channels: we print them like any other book we publish; and we also offer them for sale in electronic formats in all the usual ways.

This is sometimes called “hybrid” OA publishing. We expect that the subventions or “unlatching fees” that enable us to open these books up can cover the revenue losses that come from electronic availability, as people choose to use the OA version rather than buy a copy. But we definitely do not expect those fees—on the order of $15,000—to be our sole source of sustainable income on these books, as it would not be nearly enough. With 75 books that are hybrid OA now on the market, we are starting to be in a position to collect good data on the effect of electronic OA publishing on the sales of these books. The ability to measure the effect of OA in a hybrid publishing arena is crucial for us to be able to assess whether a payment of something like $15,000 is enough to cover our revenue losses when we open the electronic access.

Congratulations to MacArthur Fellow Wu Tsang

Congratulations to filmmaker and performance artist Wu Tsang on winning a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship. Tsang is the co-author (with Fred Moten) of “Sudden Rise at a Given Tune,” the textual component of an eponymous performance by Tsang and Moten given at the Tate Modern, London on March 25, 2017. The text is featured in our journal South Atlantic Quarterly and is openly available for three months.

Tsang was the writer, director, and editor of—as well as a central character in—the 2012 feature film Wildness, which was reviewed in Transgender Studies Quarterly. Read the article here, where it is openly available for three months. She has also created a number of other films that have been exhibited or screened in many venues around the world.

The MacArthur Foundation praises Tsang for reimagining “racialized, gendered representations beyond the visible frame to encompass the multiple and shifting perspectives through which we experience the social realm.”

Watch a video of Tsang discussing her work:

Congratulations to MacArthur Fellow Lisa Parks

Parks_2018_hi-res-download_smallCongratulations to MIT media scholar Lisa Parks on winning a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship! Parks is the co-editor (with Caren Kaplan) of the recent book Life in the Age of Drone Warfare and co-editor (with Elana Levine) of the 2007 collection Undead TV: Essays on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. She has also contributed essays to several other collections we have published.

Parks is the author of the 2005 book Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual. The MacArthur Foundation calls it “a groundbreaking analysis of satellite use, including live international transmissions, 978-0-8223-3497-2_pr
archeological excavations via remote sensing, and satellite images documenting mass graves in Srebrenica during the Bosnian conflict.”

The MacArthur Foundation praises Parks for “extending the parameters of media studies and revealing the ways in which media technologies have come increasingly to define our everyday lives, politics, and culture.”

Watch a video of Parks discussing her work:

Our 50% Off Sale Ends Today

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Attention all procrastinators: our 50% off sale ends tonight at 11:59 eastern time. If you’ve been putting off placing your order, now is the time. Use coupon code FALL50 when you place your order online.

Can’t decide what to buy? Check out our editors recommendations.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 today until 5:00 p.m.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

 

 

Illinois Journal of Mathematics Joins Duke University Press

Duke University Press is pleased to announce that the Illinois Journal of Mathematics (IJM) will join its publishing program beginning in 2019. IJM is edited by Steven Bradlow and sponsored by the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

IJM was founded in 1957 by Reinhold Baer, Joseph L. Doob, Abraham Taub, George Whitehead, and Oscar Zariski.  The inaugural volume featured papers of many of the world’s leading figures in the key areas of mathematics at the time: William Feller, Paul Levy, and Paul Malliavin in probability theory; Richard Bellman, R. P. Boas, Jack Hale, and Edwin Hewitt in analysis; Marvin Marcus, Olga Taussky, and Oscar Zariski in algebra; and Paul Erdös, L. J. Mordell, and John Tate in number theory. Since then, IJM has published many influential papers, including the proof of the Four Color Conjecture by Kenneth Appel and Wolfgang Haken.

The journal aims to disseminate at reasonable cost significant new, peer-reviewed results in all active areas of mathematics research. In addition to its regular editions it has published special volumes in honor of distinguished members of its host department including R. Baer, D. Burkholder, J. D’Angelo, J. Doob, P. Griffith, W. Haken, and P. Schupp. The journal’s editorial board, which counts distinguished mathematicians such as J. Bourgain, A. Calderon, S.S. Chern, H. Kesten, and K. Uhlenbeck among its past members, comprises a mix of preeminent mathematicians from within its host department and across the mathematical research establishment.

“We are proud to be associated with the outstanding Duke University Press mathematics publishing program and its flagship journal, the Duke Mathematical Journal,” said Steven Bradlow, Editor-in-Chief of IJM.

“Duke University Press is delighted to establish a partnership with the Department of Mathematics at UIUC to publish its long-established and highly regarded journal,” said Rob Dilworth, Journals Director at Duke University Press. “Positioned alongside the Duke Mathematical Journal and the other mathematics journals at Duke, we look forward to providing our expert mathematics publishing support to the editors as they and we work together to ensure that IJM continues to be a valuable resource to the entire mathematics research community.”

Duke University Press will start its publication of IJM with volume 63, which will feature a redesigned look. The first issue of the volume will be available spring of 2019. The journal will continue to be hosted online via Project Euclid.

Editorial Office of Duke Mathematical Journal Returns to Duke University

DMJ_167_11The Department of Mathematics, Duke University, and Duke University Press are pleased to announce that Richard Hain has been appointed managing editor for the Duke Mathematical Journal and that the journal’s editorial office will return to Duke University after more than 20 years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where Jonathan Wahl has served as managing editor. Wahl will continue his involvement with the journal as co-managing editor through June 2019.

“Jonathan Wahl has done a fantastic job growing the journal, and we are excited that he will be handing it off to Dick Hain this year,” said Jonathan Mattingly, Chair of the Department of Mathematics at Duke University. “Hain is a versatile mathematician who brings a broad view of the subject. Having the journal back at Duke will facilitate more exciting collaborations between the department and the journal.”

Hain, Professor of Mathematics at Duke University, has focused his career on the study of the topology of complex algebraic varieties. He has published multiple books and journal articles and has received numerous awards. Hain earned a BS from the University of Sydney in Australia, an MA from the Australian National University, and a PhD from the University of Illinois.

Hain said, “I am looking forward to working with the editors and the staff of Duke University Press to maintain the Duke Mathematical Journal as one of the world’s leading mathematics journals. I would like to thank Jonathan Wahl for his hard work and commitment to the journal over the past 21 years.”

“We are excited for the Duke Mathematical Journal to return to Duke University,” said Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press. “DMJ is one of the leading journals in its field and I appreciate the work that Jonathan Wahl at UNC Chapel Hill did to grow its reputation. We’re looking forward to continuing to work with him in the first year of the journal’s transition back to Duke.”

The Duke Mathematical Journal, published by Duke University Press since its inception in 1935, found its origin within the inner circles of the American mathematical research community and is one of the top mathematics journals in the world. The journal has published work by 10 Abel Prize winners, 24 Fields Medalists, and 25 Wolf Prize winners. Its Impact Factor increased from 2.171 in 2016 to 2.317 in 2017.

Visit the journal’s homepage on Project Euclid to learn more.

Duke Mathematical Journal Editors Win Prestigious Fields and Chern Medals

Alessio_FigalliCongratulations to Alessio Figalli, an editor of Duke Mathematical Journal, who won the 2018 Fields Medal. The Fields Medal is awarded every four years to mathematicians under the age of 40 who show “outstanding mathematical achievement for existing work and for the promise of future achievement.” The winners were announced yesterday at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Figalli was lauded for his contributions to the theory of optimal transport and its applications in partial differential equations, metric geometry, and probability. To learn more about Figalli’s work, read the press release from the International Mathematical Union.

While several editors of Duke Mathematical Journal have won the Fields Medal, including Jean Bourgain and Simon K. Donaldson, this is the first time the award has been presented to a current editor of the journal.

To read his work, browse Figalli’s articles on Project Euclid.


Masaki_KashiwaraWe are also pleased to share that Masaki Kashiwara, also an editor of Duke Mathematical Journal, has won the 2018 Chern Medal. The Chern Medal Award is given to an individual whose accomplishments warrant the highest level of recognition for outstanding achievements in the field of mathematics.

Kashiwara was honored for his “outstanding and foundational contributions to algebraic analysis and representation theory sustained over a period of almost 50 years.” To learn more about Kashiwara’s work, read the press release from the International Mathematical Union.

To read his work, browse Kashiwara’s articles on Project Euclid.

Congratulations to both winners!

Meet Our 2018 Summer Interns!

It is important for us to recognize our student interns and how hard they work. We would also like to hear about what they are learning from the Press and what experiences and impressions they will take with them when they leave. We created this blog post and video featuring our Summer 2018 interns to help capture all of that. Learn more about them with these brief introductions, and see what Duke University Press means to them.


Patrick Thomas Morgan

Born and raised in Watertown, NY, Patrick Morgan is a sixth-year Ph.D. candidate in Duke University’s English department. After having worked for Discover, Earth, and The American Gardener, he was inspired to develop his dissertation, titled “Manifesting Vertical Destiny: Geology, Reform, and the Stratified Earth in American Literature, Long Nineteenth Century.” Morgan has been the editorial assistant of American Literature at Duke University Press since 2014, where he has improved his critical thinking skills and learned how to summarize entire books in only one hundred words. Teaching is Morgan’s passion. After Duke he wants to continue working in education and publishing.

Patrick loves “being a part of a publishing community, working with others to create a quality publication.” 

Curious fact about Patrick:I used to be in a book discussion group with monks who made a vow of silence (Trappists, or Cistercians of the Strict Observance).”


Renee RaginOriginally from Manhattan, NY, Renee Ragin is heading this fall into her fifth year of Duke University’s Graduate Program in Literature (critical theory and philosophy). She is interning with the Acquisitions World Reader team where she has learned the importance of being detail-oriented.

“It is interesting but difficult; I am happy people are taking the time to explain everything,” she said of her work.

Ragin hopes to stay in academia and teach, or continue to work at Duke University Press.

Curious fact about Renee: “I used to be a competitive swimmer. I swam all four years of high school and a few years in college in the intramurals.”


John JerniganSophomore John Jernigan is an economics and statistics undergraduate at Duke University. Jernigan, who is from Durham, NC, interns in Duke University Press’s Journals Production Department, where he has learned the publishing and editing process for journals. Jernigan said this is his first office job and that his coworkers and the professional environment are providing him with a “great learning experience.” 

Once he leaves the Press, he plans to attend graduate school and start his own business.

Curious fact about John: “I’ve had every flavor of Pelican’s SnoBall.” (Pelican’s is a regional chain offering shaved ice.)


Ithiopia LemonsIthiopia Lemons, raised in Durham, NC, is heading into her second year as a graduate student in the Educational Technology Program at North Carolina Central University. At Duke University Press, Lemons is an Internal Communication student worker for the Staff, Operations, and Support team. Her ultimate goal is to become an entrepreneur and build on her natural body products business, which she is hoping to expand in the future. While working at the Press, she has gained office experience and improved her leadership skills.

Curious fact about Ithiopia: “My favorite fruit is cantaloupe.”


Blake Beaver.pngKansas native Blake Beaver is a Ph.D. student in the Graduate Program in Literature at Duke University. He is interning with the Books Marketing Department here at the Press. “It has been really positive. Everyone has been really friendly—busy, but good. I feel it is important to have an understanding of how people actually market their books, how you create your sales strategy, what is a realistic sales goal for a book, and to understand the particularities of the trade books versus the more academic books.” Blake wants to have a tenure-track position as a professor.

Curious fact about Blake: “I grew up riding horses and raised bucket calves.”


Erika Ianovale.PNGBorn in Milan, Italy and raised in São Paulo, Brazil, Erika Ianovale is a rising senior studying mass communication with a concentration in public relations and a minor in Spanish at North Carolina Central University. She is currently interning with the Journals Marketing team. “I have learned a lot. My supervisors and the team are very supportive and master what they do. Once I leave the Press I want to be able to learn as many things as they teach me, but mainly how to deal with the international market.”

She would love to further her publishing knowledge at DUP or do public relations work for a multinational company in New York City, California, or Florida.

Curious fact about Erika: “I speak four languages (Portuguese, Italian, English, and Spanish).”


Zachary Farmer.jpg

Junior Zachary Farmer is studying sports management at Winston-Salem State University. He is currently interning at the front desk. “It has been smooth and relaxed. When I’m done here, I want to further my communication skills.” Zachary wants to work with a professional sports team and possibly become a general manager.

Curious fact about Zachary: “I’m allergic to nuts.”

 


Bethany White.pngOriginally from Gaithersburg, MD, fifth-year senior Bethany White is a mass communication major with a concentration in broadcast media and a minor in writing/English at North Carolina Central University. White interns on Duke University Press’s Communications team, where she has learned new tools with Excel and has worked on developing her communication skills. “It’s very laid-back, but we still get our work done,” she said.

After her internship at the Press, she wants to work for a public affairs or media relations branch within the government.

Curious fact about Bethany: “I really enjoy listening to rock music.”


Anastasia Karklina.JPG

Originally from Latvia, Anastasia Karklina, is a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in Duke University’s Graduate Program in Literature, and her specialization is cultural theory and critical race studies. Karklina has worked for three semesters in the Books Marketing Department, where she has been mostly assisting with awards. She has also improved her design and administrative skills.

Curious fact about Anastasia: I am known by my friends as an activist, and I do social justice work in the community.”


Ashley Lee.jpegWilmington, NC, native Ashley Lee is a graduate student currently studying creative writing, specifically nonfiction, at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. She is interning with the Books Editorial team. “It’s going well; I’ve learned a lot. After I leave the Press I want to get a stronger understanding of what the relationship looks like between editors, editorial styles, and authors, and what long-term collaboration looks like.” She would love to continue working in academic publishing, or write for television and/or film.

Curious fact about Ashley: “I enjoy photography when I can.”


Kim Reisler.JPGKimberly Reisler, a graduate student from the Bay Area in California, is studying for her master’s in library science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is currently interning with the Digital Strategies Department. “It’s been really good. It’s fun to learn about how everything works together to create finished products. When I leave I want to have a better understanding of how to integrate different technologies, how they work together, and how technology supports the work that people do.” Kimberly wants to do something that relates to information systems and library technology.

Curious fact about Kimberly: “I love hamsters.”


Nora Nunn.JPGGraduate student Nora Nunn is from Atlanta, GA, and is pursuing her Ph.D. in English at Duke University. Her research focuses on genocide in the twentieth century in the American imagination. She is currently interning with American Literature. “It has been great. I think I’ve been the editorial assistant for American Literature for a couple of years and it’s a great way to share intellectual work through the journal. I hope to learn more ways to engage with the public and digital humanities.” Nora is open to various possibilities. She wants to do something related to education and intellectual conversation, whether it’s teaching or researching.

Curious fact about Nora: “I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Rwanda.”


Anna Tybinko.JPGAnna Tybinko, an ABD student from Philadelphia, PA, is studying for her Ph.D. at Duke University in Romance Studies. She was a World Reader intern in Books Editing, working primarily on the Brazil and Haiti readers. “My experience with the Press was wonderful. I felt like I really got to know the publishing process intimately. I’m also much more versed in questions of intellectual property now. I can imagine all of this being important insight if I get the opportunity to publish my own research.” She hopes to become a professor.

Curious fact about Anna: “Besides Spanish and Portuguese, I also know some Papiamentu (a creole language spoken in the Netherlands Antilles) and Kriolu (a creole language spoken in Cabo Verde).”

Duke University Press Sponsors ACRL awards for librarians working in Women’s and Gender Studies

acrl_1Duke University Press is pleased to announce its sponsorship of two achievement awards through the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS). The Significant Achievement Award and the Career Achievement Award will be presented at the 2018 American Library Association (ALA) annual meeting this week.

Significant Achievement Award

Shirley Lew, dean of library, teaching, and learning services at Vancouver Community College and Baharak Yousefi, head of library communications at Simon Fraser University, are the winners of the 2018 ACRL WGSS Award for Significant Achievement in Women and Gender Studies Librarianship.

This award, honoring a significant or one-time contribution to women and gender studies librarianship, was presented to Lew and Yousefi for their book, Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership. Feminists Among Us makes explicit the ways in which a grounding in feminist theory and practice impacts the work of library administrators who identify as feminists. Award chair Dolores Fidishun lauds the book as “a seminal review of the intersection of feminism, power, and leadership in our profession.”

Career Achievement Award

Diedre Conkling, director of the Lincoln County Library District, is the winner of the 2018 ACRL WGSS Award for Career Achievement.

This award, honoring significant long-standing contributions to women and gender studies in the field of librarianship over the course of a career, was presented to Conkling for her work as a longtime member of the WGSS, Feminist Task force, the Committee on the Status of Women in Librarianship, and the Library Leadership and Management Association Women’s Administrator’s Discussion Group.

“Conkling has continuously brought women’s issues to the forefront of our organization,” Fidishun states, “and has served as an inspiration and mentor to many of us in the association. Through her activism she has demonstrated the power of women’s voices in ALA and in the world, always asking the important questions and looking for ways to move women’s agendas forward in ALA.”

Congratulations to all winners!

About ACRL

The Association of College and Research Libraries is the higher education association for librarians. Representing nearly 10,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products, and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community.

About Duke University Press’s commitment to emerging fields

Duke University Press is committed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge and contributing boldly to the international community of scholarship, promoting a sincere spirit of tolerance and a commitment to learning, freedom, and truth. An early establisher of scholarship in queer theory, gender studies, and sexuality studies, Duke University Press is dedicated to supporting others who contribute to these fields.