Publishing

Libraries and Publishers Working Together: an Interview with Project Euclid’s Leslie Eager

Project Euclid is a not-for-profit hosting and publishing platform for the mathematics and statistics communities, administered jointly by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press. We recently chatted with Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid at Duke University Press about the project and her position. 

Tell us a bit about yourself and your position.

LeslieEagerI became the director of publishing services for Project Euclid just over a year ago and before that worked in marketing and sales for about five years, focusing on the academic library market. Project Euclid provides online hosting services for mathematics and statistics scholarship. I was attracted to the job because I believe in the mission, and I love that it’s a small shop where one person gets to operate in many sectors of the scholarly publishing business. I studied literature and did actually minor in math and physics without expecting it to ever come up again. But here we are! Not that my college background remotely equips me to understand new mathematical research–sadly, it doesn’t, and I don’t!–but I deeply admire the field and am glad to support it.

Euclid is a quite interesting project that is jointly managed by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press. It was started at Cornell in the early 2000s when journals just started going online. Folks at the library recognized the growing demand for online publishing suddenly required small publishers to confront a whole new set of technical skills and requirements. For math journals specifically, the need to get online prompted many formerly independent and inexpensive journals to sign up with the big commercial presses like Elsevier and Springer. The journals went online, but subscription prices rose dramatically. The Library, which has long been very innovative, had a great idea that they would provide an alternative way for small, non-profit, or society publishers to get their literature online while remaining independent. The solution was Project Euclid, an online content platform for mathematics and statistics scholarship that is easy-to-use and affordable but powerful enough to be competitive.

Duke University Press joined Cornell in running Euclid in 2008, and now the folks at the Library handle the technical side of the site, and the team at the Press handles the business: publisher relations, acquisitions, marketing and sales, customer relations, finances. It means my team, that works exclusively on Euclid, also collaborates with people in the marketing and sales department, the IT department, and other staff at the Press to make the program work. We partner with about 30 publishers located all over the world, and we host about 60 active titles. Some of the titles are subscription based, some of them are open access titles, and some of them are part of collections we sell to libraries. Every publisher controls their own business model and we try to provide the most functional and affordable hosting services possible.

What is the new direction for Project Euclid?

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Over the last few years, our new partnerships have been more and more focused on open access models. I think mathematics is an especially idealistic and activist community, and mathematicians are speaking out forcefully against those publishing practices that tend to be very expensive and throw the entire ecosystem of library subscriptions out of whack. As a result, more and more journals are trying to cast off all those old subscription costs and operate as open access publications. Euclid tries to support this effort by providing low cost but still truly excellent hosting services to those journals. We also think it’s beneficial to be a part of the Euclid publishing community, even if you’re independent. Associating your publication with similar titles makes your open access journal more discoverable, and our specialization in mathematics and statistics allows us to make your content as compatible with other math research tools or library systems as possible. We are also trying to garner our resources to make as much material on the platform openly available as possible. Most subscription-based content on the site is governed by some kind of moving access wall determined by the publishers that makes the literature freely available after three, four, or five years. The Euclid Prime collection we sell to libraries is composed of 28 titles and after five years all of that journal content becomes open access. All told, over 70% of the articles on the site are freely available to anyone with internet access.

What are your top priorities for Project Euclid?

One of my top priorities is to communicate as effectively as possible what value Project Euclid can bring to the publishing ecosystem. Publishers have a lot of options these days. If they want it to be open access, there could be a strong temptation to sign up for a WordPress site and start throwing articles up there. This is quick and really inexpensive, but at the end of the day, they’re losing out on the kind of functionality that will actually make their journal influential and competitive with all the other big publishers that have tons of resources. So I want to communicate the practical value Euclid is providing in disseminating scholarship. I want us to be affordable but still realistic about what it means to operate a sustainable project in the current market.

Another one of my top priorities was acquiring new content for the platform, and it’s been incredibly encouraging and rewarding because we were able to add 11 new journals to the platform in 2017. That’s a combination of open access, subscription-based, and collection-based content. It feels really energizing that what I thought was going to be the most challenging piece of my job—forming new partnerships—is actually the thing that has been by far the biggest success in the very first year. It suggests there are still a lot of journals out there that could benefit from Euclid’s services.

How is the project financially structured?

PE HOST OR SALESPublishers join Project Euclid under a couple of different publishing hosting models. If they want to control all of their own marketing and sales, and they only want Euclid for hosting services, they just pay us a straight set of hosting fees based on the amount of content they publish and whether they’re open access or subscription based.

On the other hand if you’re a publisher that wants hosting services but also wants support in marketing and sales, then they can join our Euclid Prime collection. This is the collection we sell to libraries on behalf of publishers. At the end of the year, the revenue we generate from those sales is divided, and part of the money supports Euclid’s operations, and part of the money is paid out to publishers as royalties. We’re really happy the revenue from Euclid Prime sales is part of what makes it possible for us to offer these really affordable hosting fee prices to open access titles. Overall we like to think there’s balance: we hope the collections we’re selling to libraries provide good value for the library but also contribute to our mission to make as much as much of the content freely available as possible.

What are the goals you have for Project Euclid?

One of our projects for the next year is to do an exploratory audit of what is available out in the world when it comes to hosting platforms. Right now our platform is entirely homegrown and based at Cornell, but we always want to make sure we’re offering the most relevant and affordable functionality we can so we’re planning a request for information process to see what other kinds of technical solutions there are in the market and whether they would serve our customers any better.

PEPI continue to be really focused on building new partnerships, especially trying to bring new partners into the Euclid Prime collection. We think this is a really, really good way for publishers to generate sustainable revenue streams while still being really good citizens of the mathematics community and not over burdening libraries with excessive costs. I’m always in talks with new partner publishers and trying to help them make a decision to join our collection.

Our biggest new product for 2018 is our new joint partnership with MSP and Duke University Press to offer MSP on Euclid, a collection of seven journals available to libraries. MSP is a fine organization with a similar size and mission, and we hope that cooperating in a competitive marketplace will generate new opportunities for all three partners.  

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?

The most rewarding part of being on the Project Euclid team is that we are a truly mission-driven operation, and our only goal is to provide services that can help make content as available and excellent and discoverable as possible. There’s a really committed group of librarians and scholars and publishing professionals who are invested in that mission, and they come up with lots of creative ideas to push it forward. I’ve enjoyed learning from them and developing new strategies for being the best possible citizen of the scholarly publishing community.

Internship Series: Meet the Duke University Press Interns

This post is a part of a four part blog series covering interning at Duke University Press. Today’s post highlights the summer student workers, their positions, and their fields of study. 

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Emily Chilton

Emily Chilton is the Social Medicine Reader intern at Duke University Press. She is a senior at Meredith College in Raleigh, North Carolina. She is majoring in English and history. She is considering graduate school to study English and plans to have a career in academic publishing.

Zachary Farmer started as a front desk intern at Duke University Press in May of 2017. He is studying sports management at Winston Salem University in Winston Salem, NC and will graduate in 2020.

Joshua Gay is a senior at North Carolina Central University in Durham, NC, studying English with a minor of mass communication. After he graduates, he plans to be a writer. Currently Josh is the Books Acquisitions intern at Duke University Press.

Sarah George-Waterfield is currently earning her doctorate degree in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Sarah earned her bachelor’s degree at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee.

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O’landra Goodwin

O’landra Goodwin is graduating in December with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication with a concentration of Public Relations and Broadcast Media from North Carolina Central University. She is the DUP communications intern.

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Tiffani Jones

Tiffani Jones is studying accounting at North Carolina Central University and is expected to graduate in December of 2018. At Duke University Press, Tiffani is the accounting intern. After she graduates, she plans to start a small accounting firm.

Ithiopia Lemons recently graduated from North Carolina Central University with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication. She will be attending NCCU in the fall for graduate school where she will study educational technology. Ithiopia is a communications intern at DUP. Ithiopia plans to teach and eventually own a public relations firm.

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Rachel Mosher

Rachel Mosher is a graduate student at North Carolina State University studying English literature. She is currently a front desk intern at Duke University Press. She holds undergraduate degrees in history and German studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Henry Nooney is a senior at Elon University studying creative writing and literature. He plans to attend grad school after earning his bachelor’s degree before going into the publishing field. Henry is the Digital Strategy & Systems intern.

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Alex Sanchez-Bressler

Alex Sanchez-Bressler is a Duke University senior studying gender, sexuality and feminist studies. Alex is the Books Editorial intern at the Press.

Charlescia Walton is a senior at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, studying international business. She plans to help businesses with their productivity abroad. She started interning at the front desk of DUP in May and completed her internship program in July.

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Sarah Watson

Sarah Watson is beginning her junior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has a double major of journalism and political science and a minor in education. She has been working at the Press as the Library Relations intern since September of 2016. After graduation, Sarah plans to work as an in house advertising employee for a large company.

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Camille Wright

Camille Wright has been at Duke University Press as the Journals Marketing intern since May. She will be graduating from North Carolina Central University in December with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication with a concentration of public relations. Camille plans to attend graduate school to study strategic public relations.

 

 

Mourning the Death of Valerie Millholland

ValerieIt is with a heavy heart that we report that our friend and former colleague Valerie Millholland has passed away. Valerie retired in 2014 after thirty years of outstanding work at the Press, most of those as Senior Editor.  She built our distinguished Latin American Studies list practically from scratch and was honored at her retirement with the Distinguished Service Award from the Conference on Latin American History at AHA, a prize generally reserved for the most important senior faculty in the field. She was an invaluable colleague and a supportive friend to many of us at the Press.  She will be greatly missed.

We have been sharing our memories of Valerie here in the office and on social media. We invite you to do the same, in the comments section below.

We reprint here part of the announcement we posted when Valerie retired:

Senior Editor Valerie Millholland will retire on January 10, 2014 after a thirty year career with Duke University Press.

Millholland will be honored for her contributions to the field of Latin American history at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Historical Association. The Conference on Latin American History has awarded Millholland the 2013 Distinguished Service Award, which will be presented at a luncheon on January 3, 2014. The selection committee, Barbara Weinstein, John Tutino, and Rebecca Scott, had this praise for Millholland: “Any historian of Latin America who has ordered books for a course in the last two decades knows just how large Duke University Press looms in our field.  Aside from supporting first-book authors and sharing her wisdom with more senior colleagues, Valerie has sought to make translated works by historians in Latin America available to a North American academic audience.  She has conducted workshops on academic publishing at a variety of universities in the US and abroad.  And she has also been instrumental in the creation of the Duke series of ‘country readers’ that has been indispensable for scholars in the Latin American field.”

According to Duke University Press Editorial Director Ken Wissoker, “very few editors have the impact on the academy that Valerie Millholland has had. When she took on the Latin American studies list the area was the poster child for the death of the monograph. Valerie showed that with intelligence and acumen the field could not only survive but thrive. She built a list based in a new form of transnational interdisciplinary work, including scholars from Latin America as well as those doing the best scholarship here.”

Millholland came to the Press in 1983 to work under director Dick Rowson. She assisted him in acquiring titles in political science and in 1989 the first title she acquired herself was published: Hidden Illness in the White House by Kenneth R. Crispell and Carlos Gomez. As an editor, she continued to acquire titles in political science and history until the mid-1990s, when she was given the opportunity to publish Ethnicity, Markets, and Migration in the Andes, a collection edited by Brooke Larson, Olivia Harris, and Enrique Tandeter. Although she knew nothing about Latin America and didn’t speak Spanish, she took it on. Under her guidance, the Press rose to prominence as one of the top publishers in Latin American Studies. She has acquired nearly 600 books including dozens of award-winners.

Millholland herself says she is most proud of launching The Latin America Readers series. After the Press published The Peru Reader in 1995 to surprising success, she realized that there was a market among students and travelers for a comprehensive look at a country’s history, politics, and culture. She worked with scholars to create The Brazil Reader, The Argentina Reader, and nine other readers, with many still under contract and in production. The Mexico Reader is one of Duke University Press’s top sellers of all time. In 2009 the Press launched The World Readers, an expansion of the series outside Latin America, also the brainchild of Millholland. City Readers are also being prepared for Latin America and it is hoped the Rio de Janeiro Reader will be ready in time for the Olympics in 2016.

Millholland says the best part of her job is her deep relationships with authors. They clearly consider her a friend and mentor.

Millholland’s colleagues at Duke University Press have been thanking her for her many years of service and important contributions. Director Steve Cohn says, “For thirty years Valerie has been a wonderful colleague for me and for all of us at the Press. It has been a real pleasure to watch her grow with the Press.” Ken Wissoker adds, “Editors at many presses have tried to follow Valerie’s model and will continue to do so long after her well-earned retirement.  It’s truly a brilliant career.”

Subject Collections in Gender Studies and Latin American Studies

As we close out another academic year, we want to remind you of useful resources for two of the strongest areas of our publishing program: gender studies and Latin American studies. In 2017, we launched new e-book subject collections in Gender Studies and Latin American Studies.

GENDER STUDIES

Our Gender Studies/Feminist Theory book list features authors well known for their work in gender studies, gay and lesbian studies, transgender studies, and queer and feminist theory. Many of our journals also address gender studies from transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives:

View the title list for the Gender Studies collection, which features more than 500 e-books and is available to libraries by purchase, lease, or lease-to-own.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

Our Latin American Studies authors are well known for their work in anthropology, art, cultural studies, Caribbean studies, Chicano and Latino studies, history, literature, film and media, and politics. Many of our journals also cover Latin America:

View the title list for the Latin American Studies collection, which features more than 500 e-books and is available to libraries by purchase, lease, or lease-to-own.

If you’re interested in gaining access to these resources, have your librarian contact our Library Relations team to get more information.

2018 Pricing is Now Available

dup_pr_filled_k_pngDuke University Press 2018 pricing for single-issue journal titles, the e-Duke Journals collections, the e-Duke Books collection, and Euclid Prime, a collection of mathematics and statistics titles hosted on Project Euclid, is now available online at dukeupress.edu/Libraries.

New Online Content Platform

In November 2017 all Duke University Press humanities and social science journals and e-books will migrate to the Silverchair Information Systems platform, providing scholars with a single reading and research experience across books and journals. Visit dukeupress.edu/Libraries/migration for additional details and to sign up for e-mail alerts.

Partnership with MSP

Duke University Press, Project Euclid, and MSP (Mathematical Sciences Publishers) have entered into a partnership to sell a package of seven MSP journals hosted on the Project Euclid platform. Institutional subscribers gain a subscription management tool that stores librarian contact and IP information. Project Euclid also exclusively provides COUNTER- and SUSHI-compliant usage statistics. Pricing for MSP on Euclid is now available online at dukeupress.edu/Libraries.

Addition of Two Titles to the 2018 Journals List

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the additions of the Journal of Korean Studies and English Language Notes to its journal list. Both journals are published biannually.

The Journal of Korean Studies is the preeminent journal in its field, publishing high-quality articles in all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences on a broad range of Korea-related topics, both historical and contemporary.

A respected forum of criticism and scholarship in literary and cultural studies since 1962, English Language Notes is dedicated to pushing the edge of scholarship in literature and related fields in new directions.

For more information about 2018 pricing, please contact our Library Relations team.

Announcing MSP on Euclid, a Partnership between MSP, Project Euclid, and Duke University Press

MSP-on-EuclidMSP (Mathematical Sciences Publishers), Project Euclid, and Duke University Press have partnered to launch the MSP on Euclid collection, bringing seven mathematics journals published by MSP together with the strong functionality available through the Project Euclid platform.

Dedicated to providing alternatives in math publishing, MSP, Project Euclid, and Duke University Press are all not-for-profit and have similarly sized programs. The goal of the MSP on Euclid collection is to offer libraries new features as well as the option to consolidate their platforms. MSP on Euclid includes the same seven journals sold by MSP in their MSP package but now also hosted by Project Euclid and sold by Duke University Press.

“Project Euclid is pleased to welcome seven of MSP’s distinguished journals to our platform and to work with Duke University Press on increasing their dissemination,” said Leslie Eager, Project Euclid’s director of publishing services. “Our three organizations strive to provide the mathematics community with truly excellent not-for-profit publishing services, and we look forward to strengthening our impact through this collaboration.”

“MSP is committed to finding new ways to make mathematics publishing more sustainable and to bring our content to scholars around the world. We hope this new collaboration will benefit researchers as well as libraries,” said Rob Kirby, chief executive of MSP.

MSP on Euclid provides institutional subscribers with valuable enhancements of the MSP package still available from MSP. Project Euclid’s platform offers libraries a subscription management tool that stores librarian contact and IP information. Institutional subscribers gain COUNTER- and SUSHI-compliant usage statistics exclusively through the platform. Single sign-on authentication through Shibboleth is also available. Duke University Press provides institutions with all sales services and customer support for the collection.

“Duke University Press has been publishing mathematics scholarship for over 80 years. We hope that our experience in math sales and customer support will bring MSP’s well-regarded, high-quality content to a wider audience,” said Steve Cohn, director of Duke University Press.

For additional information and pricing for MSP on Euclid, visit dukeupress.edu/Libraries.

French Historical Studies Authors Win Two Prizes

The Society for French Historical Studies has awarded two prizes to articles featured in French Historical Studies!

ddfhs_39_4The 2016 William Koren, Jr. Prize is awarded by the Society for French Historical Studies to the most outstanding article on any period of French history published the previous year by a scholar appointed at a college or university in the United States or Canada. The prize committee seeks out contenders from American, Canadian, and European journals and may decide whether articles that have appeared as part of a book or in the published proceedings of a scholarly conference are eligible for consideration. This year’s award goes to Nguyễn Thị Điểu, author of “Ritual, Power, and Pageantry: French Ritual Politics in Monarchical Vietnam.” This article is featured in French Historical Studies, volume 39, issue 4 (October 2016).

ddfhs_39_2The runner up for the 2016 Malcolm Bowie Prize was Dónal Hassett, whose article, “Pupilles de l’Empire: Debating the Provision for Child Victims of the Great War in the French Empire,” was featured in French Historical Studies volume 39, issue 2 (April 2016). The Malcolm Bowie Prize, given by the Society for French Historical Studies, is awarded each year for the best article published in the preceding year by an early-career researcher in the broader discipline of French Studies.

Congratulations to both winners! Read these award-winning articles, made freely available.

Remembering Craufurd Goodwin

goodwin-cropped.jpgWe are saddened to learn that Craufurd Goodwin, James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Economics and the founding editor of History of Political Economy, passed away last week.

He is remembered at Duke University Press for being an incredibly vibrant and larger-than-life person. Goodwin’s editorial term for the journal lasted from 1969 through 2010 and he was a great publishing partner with the Press for many years.

From Duke Today:

“Craufurd was one of a small group of people who started the field of the history of economic thought,” said Paul Dudenhefer, assistant director of the Duke EcoTeach writing program who worked with Goodwin for more than 15 years. “It used to be done as part of economics in general. Through the founding of the journal, he helped make it its own subfield. He institutionalized the subfield of the history of economics.”

Among colleagues, Goodwin made the environment interesting. Dudenhefer said Goodwin “was always eager to talk about the fascinating things he was reading and writing about. Working with him was extremely educational and entertaining. He made me laugh every day.”

A past president and distinguished fellow of the History of Economics Society, Goodwin was instrumental in the construction of the professional community of historians of economics.

Our sincerest condolences go out to Craufurd Goodwin’s family, friends, and colleagues, as well as the Duke community.

Now Available: First Issue of Archives of Asian Art published by Duke University Press

ddaaa_67_1We are pleased to announce the first issue of Archives of Asian Art published by Duke University Press, volume 67, issue 1, is now available at asianart.dukejournals.org.

Archives of Asian Art, edited by Stanley K. Abe, is devoted to publishing new scholarship on the art and architecture of South, Southeast, Central, and East Asia. Articles discuss premodern and contemporary visual arts, archaeology, architecture, and the history of collecting. Submissions are encouraged in all areas of study related to Asian art and architecture to maintain a balanced representation of regions and types of art, and to present a variety of scholarly perspectives. Every issue is fully illustrated (with color plates in the online version), and each fall issue includes an illustrated compendium of recent acquisitions of Asian art by leading museums and collections.

Browse the table-of-contents for the current issue and read back content from 2001 to the present.

Open Access at Duke University Press: Blog Series Highlights

open-access-efforts-at-duke-university-pressOver the past week we have shared a series of four blog posts covering open access at Duke University Press. Topics in the series included Project Euclid, Knowledge Unlatched, Environmental Humanities, and The Carlyle Letters Online.

Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid, shared information about the platform and the ways it supports open access in the mathematics and statistics world.

Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press, offered information about how we’ve participated with Knowledge Unlatched in the past and why we’ll continue in the future.

Brent Kinser, coordinating editor for The Carlyle Letters Online, shared his thoughts on the project and discussed his vision for its future.

We highlighted some of the exciting new content from the open-access journal Environmental Humanities, edited by Thom van Dooren and Elizabeth DeLoughrey, and the relationship between the journal and its five leading research university partners.

To learn more about these open-access initiatives at Duke University Press, read our previous blog posts.