Citizen Science: Practices and Problems

“Citizen Science: Practices and Problems,” the newest issue of East Asian Science, Technology and Society, is now freely available online for three months.

Topics include:

and more. Read the full issue, freely available for three months.

What’s Next for Latinx?

We’re pleased to share “What’s Next for Latinx?”, the newest issue of Theater, edited by Chantal Rodriguez and Tom Sellar. Read the entire issue, freely available for three months.

With roots in protest and social change, Latinx theater carries an artistic vitality and urgency that has only been augmented by resistance to the current wave of repressive white nationalism. Even as U.S. agencies perpetuate inhumane policies and deplorable human rights violations against Latinxs, Latinx theatermakers continue to claim their places on America’s largest stages. In “What’s Next for Latinx?”, contributors ask where Latinx theater is going and what challenges it faces.

Final Day of our Spring Sale

Today is the final day of our Spring Sale! Head over to our website right now to save 40% on all in-stock books and journal issues. Just enter coupon code SPRING40 at checkout.

Please note that journal subscriptions and society memberships are not included in this sale. See all the fine print here. Don’t delay, the sale ends at 11:59 pm Eastern time tonight, May 28.

Digital Methods and Traditional Chinese Literary Studies

JCL_5-2_coverIn the newest issue of the Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture, contributors explore how the digital humanities have revolutionized the study of classical Chinese literature. Edited by Jing Chen, Thomas J. Mazanec, and Jeffrey R. Tharsen, the issue depicts how modern technologies can enhance traditional philology and literary studies.

Methods discussed include computational analysis of Tang dynasty poems, using Gephi software to compare Ming dynasty anthologies, and creating network diagrams from ancient Chinese annotations.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.

Sexual Politics, Sexual Panics

dif_30_1_coverSexual Politics, Sexual Panics,” the newest issue of differences, edited by Robyn Wiegman, is available now.

With essays that parse keywords like “#MeToo,” “Consent,” “Testimony,” and “Trigger Warnings,” and articles on Larry Nassar, feminist disappointment, black feminist alternatives to confession and visibility, and more, the issue acts as an archive of current concerns in a constantly changing landscape of sexual politics.

Read Robyn Wiegman’s introduction, freely available, and Eva Cherniavsky’s essay on #MeToo, open through August. You can browse the rest of the contents here.

Contributors include Kadji Amin, Eva Cherniavsky, Andrea Long Chu, Jennifer Doyle, Joseph J. Fischel, Lynne Joyrich, Jennifer C. Nash, Emily A. Owens, Shoniqua Roach, Juana María Rodríguez, Mairead Sullivan, Samia Vasa, Rebecca Wanzo, Robyn Wiegman, and Terrance Wooten.

LGBTQ+ and Latin American History

Día_de_la_Visibiliad_Lésbica_Santa_Fe-_Argentina_-_Tamara_Zentner-7This spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history.

We’re pleased to make “LGBTQ+ and Latin American History,” a curated collection of HAHR articles, freely available through the end of August:

Also check out “Trans Studies en las Américas,” a new issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (volume 6, issue 2), which offers a hemispheric perspective on trans and travesti studies. Read the introduction, freely available, or browse the contents.

Image: Día de la Visibilidad Lésbica Santa Fe, Argentina, 2018. Photo by Tamara Zentner. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

The Chasers Reunite for Book Launch

Recently a group of friends who attended Tucson High School in the 1950s gathered to launch the book of prose poetry inspired by their experiences, Renato Rosaldo’s The Chasers. Rosaldo writes about the gathering in this guest post.

On May 11, 2019, I went to Tucson with my son, Sam, and his son, Micah. I handed books to the Chasers as they arrived at the party. After a short while the Chasers slowly opened their books, They took their time. It was a lot to absorb, their joy and the realization that this was their/our book.  Once all had arrived, Louie then asked me to sign his copy. I did so slowly, keeping the ceremonial rhythm. It gave me time to find a personal dedication for each one. I followed suit for each of the others as they asked me to sign.

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Renato Rosaldo signing a copy of The Chasers. Photo by Daniel Chavez.

The afternoon was cool for Tucson in May. The moment we finished eating a thunderstorm, with heavy wind and lightening abruptly came up. A door slammed loudly. We laughed and said Rocha must have slammed the door because he was pissed that we didn’t invite him. He passed away a couple of months ago.

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L-R, Rich Koenig, Louie Dancil, and Dickie Delahanty. Photo by Daniel Chavez.

We went indoors and Angie, then Patti asked me to read from the book. Bobby was on speaker phone and he punctuated the reading with his moments of recognition, bellowing, “Oh, my God.” We laughed and kept a silence and sense of awe. The book and the evening left me with a feeling of having experienced deep meaning. Thank you Chasers. Thank you book-makers. I am still in awe.

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The Chasers at a reunion in 2018. Photo by Daniel Chavez.

You can save 40% on The Chasers during our Spring Sale with coupon code SPRING40. Read an excerpt here and watch the trailer here.

Trans Studies en las Américas

coverimageIn honor of International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia, we’re proud to spotlight “Trans Studies en las Américas,” the newest issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly.

Trans and travesti studies take many forms throughout the Americas: as scholarly work, interventions into state practices, activist actions, and eruptions of creative energies. These approaches are regionally inflected by flows of people, ideas, technologies, and resources.

Trans Studies en las Américas,” edited by Claudia Sofía Garriga-López, Denilson Lopes, Cole Rizki, and Juana María Rodríguez, offers a hemispheric perspective on trans and travesti issues. Contributors explore how shifts in cultural epistemologies, aesthetics, geographies, and languages enliven theorizations of politics, subjectivity, and embodiment.

Browse the table of contents and read the introduction, freely available.

Save 40% During our Spring Sale

SPRING40_SaleMay2019_Blog

It’s time to stock up on summer reading. Head to our website and save 40% on all in-stock books and journal issues by entering coupon code SPRING40.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. And you can’t combine multiple orders to maximize the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final. If you have additional questions, check out our FAQs.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (Monday-Friday, 8-5 Eastern Time).

The sale ends Tuesday, May 28 at 11:59 Eastern Time. Start shopping now!

Top Ten Most Read Articles From HAHR

HAHR_picThis spring, we’re excited to spotlight the Hispanic American Historical Review (HAHR), a field-defining journal of Latin American history.

HAHR publishes vital work across thematic, chronological, regional, and methodological specializations, with articles featuring original, innovative research and path-breaking analysis.

Interested in reading more? Here are the top ten most frequently read articles from HAHR from the past year, freely available through August:

Want to keep up to date on the latest cutting-edge articles from HAHR? Sign up for email alerts when new issues are published.

Learn more about the journal in “Celebrating 100 Years of the Hispanic American Historical Review,” produced last year in honor of HAHR’s centennial: