history

New Titles in US History

Black text in a white, transparent box reads, "Organization for American Historians 2022 Conference Exhibit. Use code OAH22 for 40% off when you order from dukeupress.edu."

We will be joining you in person for the Organization for American Historians 2022 Annual Conference! You can find us at Booth Lite 1 in the exhibit hall. Editorial Director Gisela Fosado and Assistant Editor Ale Mejía will be on site with you in Boston, and many of our authors and editors are on panels around the conference.

Until May 10, save 40% on books and journal issues with coupon code OAH22 when you order on our website. Customers in the UK and Europe can order books with this code from our UK partner, Combined Academic Publishers. Our conference landing page has all our newest titles in US history studies, or you can browse our complete list of books and journals in the field here.

If you are looking to connect with any of our editors about your book project, see our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our online submissions guidelines and submission portal here.

New Titles in History

We will miss meeting with authors, editors, and friends of the Press in person at the American Historical Association annual conference, but we look forward to connecting with you all virtually. Until March 31, 2022, save 40% on books and journal issues with coupon code AHA22 when you order on our website. Customers in the UK and Europe can order books with this code from our UK partner, Combined Academic Publishers. You can browse a complete list of books and journals in history here.


Assistant Editor Alejandra Mejía

I am saddened to not be joining folks in person in New Orleans, but I am excited to join virtual sessions and connect with prospective authors digitally. I acquire in Latinx History and I am particularly interested in histories of labor, migration, social movements, pan-ethnic and pan-racial solidarity, and scholarship deconstructing the ways in which we currently understand Latinidad. If you’d like to meet with me to discuss your book proposal, just send me an email at alejandra.mejia@dukeupress.edu. I hope you are all taking care of yourselves and your communities!


If you are joining us for the virtual week, you can find DUP authors in multiple panels:

Join DUP authors for panels at the in-person AHA:

If you were hoping to connect with Gisela Fosado, Joshua Gutterman Tranen, Alejandra Mejía, or one of our other editors about your book project at the American Historical Association annual conference, please reach out by email. See our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our online submissions guidelines and submission portal here.

New Titles in American History

We wish we could be meeting authors and readers in-person at the Organization for American Historians Annual Conference. We know that many of you look forward to stocking up on new titles at special discounts at our conferences, so we are pleased to offer a 40% discount on all in-stock books and journal issues with coupon code OAH21 until May 31, 2021.

Check out the latest American history titles in our virtual catalog, below. And explore all of our books and journals in American history here.

If you were hoping to connect with Gisela Fosado or one of our other editors about your book project at OAH, please reach out to them by email. See our editors’ specialties and contact information here and our online submissions guidelines here.

Excerpt from Recycled Stars, by Mary R. Desjardins

The following is an excerpt from the recently published Recycled Stars: Female Film Stardom in the Age of Television and Video, by Mary R. Desjardins. The popularity of television in postwar suburban America had a devastating effect on the traditional Hollywood studio system. Yet many aging Hollywood stars used television to revive their fading careers. In this book, Desjardins examines the recirculation, ownership, and control of female film stars and their images in television, print, and new media. 
Desjardins cover image, 5802-2“Probably more than any other female star persona of the silent era, Gloria Swanson’s represented the range of identities possible for the “New Woman,” who symbolized the transformative promises of early twentieth-century modernity. While Swanson did not wield as much power in the film industry as did the actress, producer, and studio owner Mary Pickford, nor were her characters usually as sexually free as those played by Clara Bow or Louise Brooks, her persona was a blend of textual and extratextual identities that suggested female self-fulfillment was about taking advantage of the moment and projecting oneself into the future. After a series of very successful films produced by Paramount Studios, Swanson became an independent producer and businesswoman in the 1920s to sustain her labor power and image value. The actress and the characters she played also made the most of the prosthetic potentials of the commodity (e.g., fashion) to control or sustain their place and duration in the marriage economy and to be recognized by their mates and other women for this achievement. Publicity about Swanson during her acting career up to the early 1930s made maintenance of a place in various economies, both traditional and new, an explicit goal….

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Trailer for The Left Side of History by Kristen Ghodsee

In The Left Side of History: World War II and the Unfulfilled Promise of Communism in Eastern Europe, Kristen Ghodsee tells the stories of fighters and activists who worked for Communist ideals in Bulgaria and shows how the dreams of the Communist past hold enduring appeal for those currently disappointed by the promises of democracy. The book is coming in January 2015. Watch the trailer now!

“Sense of Sound” article wins 2012 Daumas Prize

We are pleDif_22_2-3.coverased to announce that Mara Mills has won the Daumas Prize for her article "On Disability and Cybernetics: Helen Keller, Norbert Wiener, and the Hearing Glove," which appeared in "The Sense of Sound" a special issue of our journal, differences (volume  22, issue 2-3). The Maurice Daumas Prize is a new prize from the International Committee for the History of Technology, and it aims to encourage innovative and superbly written research in the history of technology. Congratulations, Mara!