#UPWeek2017

University Press Week: #Twitterstorm

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Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is #TwitterStorm, featuring posts about how authors and university presses use social media to spread their messages. Check out the video above to see our author Lynn Comella discuss how she considers social media a form of activism. Then head over to Harvard University Press to get a look at how social media has played a role in the publication of Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide. Next, Greg Britton, Editorial Director of Johns Hopkins University Press, extols the virtues of Twitter. Athabasca University Press showcases how they utilized social media channels to create a citywide book club. Finally, a post from Beacon Press demonstrates how social media has helped advertise and keep conversation going about Christopher Edmin’s For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too.

Come back tomorrow for a great Veterans Day post from us and more from the University Press Week blog tour. And keep sharing your love for university presses on social media with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

University Press Week: Producing the Books that Matter

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Welcome back to the University Press Week blog tour. Today’s theme is Producing the Books that Matter. Visit University of Kansas Press to learn about how editorial and production departments work together to create books. Then head to University of Michigan Press for an interview with Jay Timothy Dolmage, author of their upcoming book Academic Ableism. David Goodwin will talk about the production of his book Left Bank of the Hudson, which was published this Fall by Fordham University Press. At University of Washington Press, their press director and president of the AAUP, Nicole Mitchell, will write about the value of university presses. Yale University Press will be featuring an episode of their podcast on the making of the Voynich Manuscript. UBC Press offers a post on the challenges and rewards of working closely with an author to develop a book for a general rather than a scholarly audience. University of California Press and Georgetown University Press are also participating.

Check back here tomorrow for more great blog posts and don’t forget to share your love for university presses online with the hashtags #LookItUP and #ReadUP.

University Press Week 2017: Knowledge Matters

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It’s University Press Week! University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society. We’ll be celebrating with displays at the Durham County Library‘s South Regional branch, the Hayti Heritage Center, North Carolina Central University library, and around Duke University’s campus at the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Music Library, the Office for Faculty Advancement, the John Hope Franklin Center, the Nicholas School of the Environment, and the Center for Multicultural Affairs. If you’re in Durham please stop by and check out some of our recent titles and pick up a free bookmark, pen, or magnet.

This year’s University Press Week Theme is #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters. In today’s political climate—where “fake news” and “alternate facts” are believed by so many people—valuing expertise and knowledge can feel like a radical act. University presses not only believe in facts and knowledge, but traffic in them daily, publishing approximately 14,000 books and more than 1,100 journals each year, read by people around the globe.

We launched our “Read to Respond” series to highlight some of our own groundbreaking scholarship that engages with today’s pressing issues. Each topic, from student activism to racial justice, is highlighted with a reading list that encourages students and teachers alike to join the conversation surrounding these current events. Check out your favorite “Read to Respond” topics below and share these resources in and out of the classroom. These articles are freely available until December 15, 2017.

We now encourage you to learn more about the important work of university presses by checking out the week-long blog tour. Each day has a different theme and will feature posts by five-ten different presses. Today’s theme is Scholarship Making a Difference. Begin at Temple University Press for a post on scholarship on racism and whiteness. Then head to Wayne State University Press to read about their upcoming book on slavery in 21st-century America. University Press of Colorado has a feature on their post-truth focused titles. At Princeton University Press, Al Bertrand writes on the importance of non-partisan peer reviewed social science in today’s political climate. George Mason University Press offers a post on the path to discovery of an overlooked and misunderstood yet influential historical figure, William Playfair. At University of Toronto Press, their history editor in higher education discusses the importance of making scholarship accessible to students and the role of publishers in helping to build better citizens. Wilfrid Laurier University Press offers a roundup of their Indigenous scholarship with commentary from the series editor about its importance. Oregon State University Press  Finally, stop at Cambridge University Press to see their post.

Check back here each day to see the stops on the blog tour and our own University Press Week posts. Don’t forget to share with the hashtags #ReadUP and #LookItUP!