Remembering Former Director Larry Malley

We were sad to learn of the death of former Duke University Press director Larry Malley on September 13, 2018.

malleyMalley worked at Duke University Press from 1988 to 1993, first serving as Editorial and Associate Director and then taking over the directorship from Dick Rowson. Following his tenure here he served as the director of the University of Arkansas Press. His obituary details his long career in publishing.

Editorial Director Ken Wissoker says, “Larry Malley took a chance in hiring me to Duke and brought in Emily Young as Marketing Director, thus even in a short tenure setting the stage for what would come after.  He was a warm, outgoing colleague and a discerning editor. Like many of his era he started as a salesperson and scout for textbooks, going office to office at colleges for McGraw Hill.  The ease that job requires in striking up conversation and then honing in on a good book idea served him well his whole career.”

Lee Willoughby-Harris, our Books Marketing Metadata and Digital Systems Manager, remembers working with Malley: “Larry was a tireless advocate for university presses and their role in both academic life and the public sphere. He was also our mooring in a time of great transition at Duke University Press. The staff he brought to Durham during the late 1980s and early 1990s became the foundation for the success and influence that Duke enjoys today.” She adds, “On a personal level, I found Larry’s knowledge of and appreciation for college basketball along Tobacco Road to be unmatched among university press directors.”

We send our condolences to Larry Malley’s family, including his wife Maggie and his children and grandchildren.

 

Critical Crossroads: Erdogan and the Transformation of Turkey

med_29_3_coverThe most recent issue of Mediterranean Quarterly, “Critical Crossroads: Erdogan and the Transformation of Turkey,” edited by Kumru F. Toktamış and Isabel David, is now available.

Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdogan has already established his place in history books, but the nature and the meaning of his legacy will be determined by researchers, intellectuals, scholars, and activists, people who observe, record, and study his leadership. In this issue, noteworthy scholars document and analyze the decline of a twenty-first century, democratically elected government into a domestically punitive and regionally aggressive authoritarian regime.

Browse the table-of-contents and read the introduction to the issue, made freely available.

The Novel and Neoliberalism

coverimageThe most recent issue of Novel, “The Novel and Neoliberalism,” edited by John Marx and Nancy Armstrong, is now available.

How has the form of the novel responded to the conditions now grouped under the term “neoliberalism”? These conditions have generated an explosion of narrative forms that make the past two decades one of the two or three most significant periods in the history of the novel. The contributors to this issue ask whether these formal innovations can be understood as an unprecedented break from the past or the latest chapter in a process that has been playing out over the past three centuries. In response to this question, they use a range of contemporary novels to consider whether conditions of multinational capitalism limit the novel’s ability to imagine a future beyond the limits of that world. Do novels that reject the option of an alternative world nevertheless reimagine the limits of multinational capitalism as the precondition for such a future? With these concerns in mind, contributors demonstrate how major contemporary novelists challenge national traditions of the novel both in the Anglophone West and across the Global South. This collective inquiry begins with a new essay by and interview with British novelist Tom McCarthy.

Browse the table-of-contents and read the introduction to the issue, made freely available.

New Poetry from Rafael Campo

978-1-4780-0021-1After publishing five of Rafael Campo’s previous books, we are delighted to be releasing his first collection this month: Comfort Measures Only: New and Selected Poems, 1994–2016. Gathered from his long career as a poet-physician, these eighty-eight poems—thirty of which have never been previously published in a collection—pull back the curtain in the ER, laying bare our pain and joining us all in spellbinding moments of pathos. Here we share one of his new poems from the collection.

 

Invaders

She says that back in Mexico the map
of the United States that hung above
the teacher’s desk was like a floating island
impossible to reach, impossible

for any girl like her to even dream
might welcome her. She gazes now instead
above my desk, her flattened breasts a map
no more accessible, no more forgiving,

the spreading cancer numinous, one could
say even beautiful, deceptive as
that distant promise. Here just one short year,
she tells me of the landlord calling them

“invaders,” six of them who shared a room,
the only toilet down the hall. She says
she cried alone beneath the Virgin Mary,
the church the only place she knew to go,

the flickering of candles casting shadows
in shapes above her everywhere like maps
to other worlds; she says she prayed for this
to be a better world. The clinic throbs

in pain outside my door, so many dreams
deferred, so many hearts invaded by
resentment or remorse, so many seas traversed
and borders crossed. So many journeys done.

To order a copy of Comfort Measures Only for 30% off, please use coupon code E18CAMPO at checkout.

 

Black Marriage

dif_29_2_coverThe most recent issue of differences, “Black Marriage,” edited by Ann duCille, is now available.

Marriage has been a contested term in African American studies. Contributors to this special issue address the subject of “black marriage,” broadly conceived and imaginatively considered from different vantage points. Historically, some scholars have maintained that the systematic enslavement of Africans completely undermined and effectively destroyed the institutions of heteropatriarchal marriage and family, while others have insisted that slaves found creative ways to be together, love each other, and build enduring conjugal relationships and family networks in spite of legal prohibitions against marriage, forced separations, and other hardships of the plantation system. Still others have pointed out that not all African Americans were slaves and that free black men and women formed stable marriages, fashioned strong nuclear and extended families, and established thriving black communities in antebellum cities in both the North and the South.

Against the backdrop of such scholarship, contributors look back to scholarly, legal, and literary treatments of the marriage question and address current concerns, from Beyoncé’s music and marriage to the issues of interracial coupling, marriage equality, and the much discussed decline in African American marriage rates.

Read the introduction, “Black Marriage and Meaning from Antoney and Isabella to ‘Beyoncé and Her Husband,'” made freely available.

978-1-4780-0048-8Ann duCille is also author of the new book Technicolored: Reflections on Race in the Time of TV. In it, she combines cultural critique with personal reflections on growing up with the new medium of TV to examine how televisual representations of African Americans have changed over the last sixty years. Whether explaining how watching Shirley Temple led her to question her own self-worth or how televisual representation functions as a form of racial profiling, duCille traces the real-life social and political repercussions of the portrayal and presence of African Americans on television.

978-0-8223-5008-8Also of interest is the book Inequalities of Love: College-Educated Black Women and the Barriers to Romance and Family by Averil Y. Clarke. While conventional wisdom suggests that all women, regardless of race, must sacrifice romance and family for advanced educations and professional careers, Clarke’s research reveals that educated black women’s disadvantages in romance and starting a family are consequences of a system of racial inequality and discrimination. Her discussion of the inequities that black women experience in romance highlights the connections between individuals’ sexual and reproductive decisions, their performance of professional or elite class identities, and the avoidance of racial stigma.

What’s Online Peer Review For? Guest Post by Stacy Lavin

It’s Peer Review Week, an annual event that brings together individuals, institutions, and organizations committed to sharing the central message that good peer review, whatever shape or form it might take, is critical to scholarly communications. We are pleased to share a guest post by Senior Managing Editor for Journals, Stacy Lavin.

You might look at the title to this post and think: Duh, it’s for peer review. Right? I mean, what is an online peer-review system but a digital version of the analog process that editorial offices have been following for centuries? All anachronisms (and attempts at catchy openers) aside, that’s exactly what I used to think. That is, it’s what I thought online peer review was for before I spent about four years acting as an intermediary between our journals’ editorial offices that use online peer review and the vendor for the system we use (Aries/Editorial Manager). In those four years, I’ve discovered that online peer review has the potential to do much more than streamline the work editorial offices do to vet and select content for publication. It has the potential not only to address the pain points of academic journal editors and their staff but also to serve the broader strategic interests of editorial offices, scholars, and publishers in less obvious ways.

As we’ve been reminded during Peer Review Week 2018, “good peer review, whatever shape or form it might take, is critical to scholarly communications.” This year’s Peer Review Week theme of diversity in peer review has, moreover, prompted us to consider the invisible and indirect barriers to “good peer review,” which resonates with the growing awareness of the importance of actively and systematically developing a culture of inclusion within the community of university presses. As Sandra Korn and Alejandra Mejía astutely observe, writing of their work to coordinate the student intern program in the Books Acquisitions department of Duke University Press, it “is vital to the intellectual work of publishing to have queer students, students of color, students from low socioeconomic backgrounds, and student activists engaging with the literature that is oftentimes theorizing the experiences of their communities.” Alice Meadows, writing just this morning, reminds us that while we’ve known for a while that scholarly publishing overall is an “overwhelmingly white and cis-female industry, with a leadership that is disproportionately white male dominated,” it is becoming clear that peer review is likewise “less diverse and more biased than it could or should be, which is hindering our efforts to ensure an inclusive, ethical, trustworthy scholarly communications ecosystem.”

Getting back to my opening thoughts about online peer review, I would add that cultivating an inclusive culture in all of the spheres of our work as a scholarly publishing community is one of the broader strategic interests that online peer-review systems have the potential to further. For instance, among the eight tactics Meadows recommends in her post as ways to tackle diversity and inclusion in peer review, two of them involve pillars of online peer-review systems: data and software. Tactic number six is “Collect the data.” While there has been limited progress in creating gender equity in referee populations, Meadows suggests that at the very least collecting the data is “a critical first step toward being able to understand, and ultimately resolve, the issue.” Tactic number seven is “Make use of available tools” like editorial management software that can “spot and reduce the risk of bias in the selection of reviewers.”

Now, you might be thinking peer-review systems are hardly built to address diversity and they’re often seen as pretty onerous to manage by users as it is. Good point. Let’s step back for a moment and consider that the main challenges that online peer-review systems originally aimed to address were ironically the high labor requirements of managing the processing and vetting of submissions—inviting reviewers, reminding reviewers, making decisions, sending decision letters, asking for revisions, reminding authors to send in revisions—not to mention increasing concern over reviewer availability and fatigue. Online peer-review systems stepped in to help solve some of these problems (automating reminders, etc.), while more avant-garde services have sought to streamline the work of reviewers themselves (Rubriq, etc.). While the automation and data tracking features of peer-review systems have been useful, reviewer fatigue has been a more elusive and possibly more critical challenge. For instance, there are journals who claim to practice blind review but then—passing the burden of finding a reviewer onto the contributor—require contributors not only to nominate a reviewer for their submission but also obtain the permission of that reviewer to nominate them (which I guess makes it not-so-blind review).

With online peer review, as is often the case with technology, solving some frustrations gave birth to new frustrations. The typical grievances are aversions to non-intuitive interfaces—the tinkering, system-admin-oriented environments where coders and likeminded folks feel right at home but others…don’t (I’ll leave it to Kent Anderson to articulate the way many users feel about manuscript tracking and submission systems). But that’s just one (solvable) problem representing only one facet of the massive capabilities these systems have the potential to materialize to help the scholarly publishing community facilitate a more inclusive peer review culture (not to mention more efficient editorial and production processes). In fact, I am convinced that the biggest opportunity of the current state of online peer-review is also a source of the biggest concerns users have: it can do so much more than they need. They’d prefer not having so many functions, options, buttons, or configurations. They don’t want to have to adapt their workflows to the system. The beauty of it is that they don’t have to. As Meadows notes, we can use existing features of these robust systems to pursue the multifaceted interests of the scholarly communications community. As well-funded companies recognize the value of and acquire online peer-review systems, those systems might become more flexible and capable of developing the tools we need to solve the more elusive problems of peer review like reviewer fatigue and making peer review more inclusive—in fact, solving the latter is key to solving the former. Likewise, established publishing vendors are adding peer review to their suite of services, seeking input from the academic publishing community on how to best meet their needs. Our voices as publishers and potential consumers of their expanded services will carry a lot of weight in those conversations, I would think. As I see it, our job in this climate of consolidation/expansion with respect to online peer-review software is to focus on what these systems can do to help us, not just our workflows but also our broader strategic interests, such as cultivating inclusion in all aspects of what we do. It’s not our job to adapt to these systems (they’re almost infinitely configurable) but theirs to adapt to us in our efforts to actively and systematically foster diversity in scholarly publishing.

How a Culture of Inclusion Can Improve Peer Review: Guest Post by Sandra Korn and Alejandra Mejía

It’s Peer Review Week, an annual event that brings together individuals, institutions, and organizations committed to sharing the central message that good peer review, whatever shape or form it might take, is critical to scholarly communications. We are pleased to share a guest post by Assistant Editor Sandra Korn and Editorial Associate Alejandra Mejía to kick off the week.

Last year for peer review week, our Editorial Director Ken Wissoker wrote about why he loves peer review. This year, we have a different sort of take: we want to look at how mentoring and developing students from diverse backgrounds can strengthen the work of book acquisitions.

bedit field trip

Staff and interns from our Books Acquisitions department on a field trip to the Museum of Durham History, including post authors Sandra Korn (back left) and Alejandra Mejía (front, second from right).

The two of us work together to coordinate the student internship program in the Books Acquisitions department at Duke University Press. Our department relies on our students to carry out some of the administrative work that is essential to our workflow, but we also draw them into conversations about projects in their field of interest, and provide professional development experience for them in acquisitions and across the press.

How do diversity and inclusion, the academic peer review process, and student internships overlap? We believe that listening to voices that have been traditionally underrepresented in the publishing industry can make our editorial work, and our author’s books, more thoughtful and responsive. This is especially vital because our industry remains majority white — a recent study found that 91% of employees in scholarly publishing identify as white. Valuing insights from our student interns can aid the process of upholding socially conscientious scholarship as well as promote a more inclusive culture within academic publishing.

Duke Press hires three to five undergraduate and graduate students during the summer and school year, and we are able to pay all of our student interns. Many other university presses, especially those at public universities with constrained budgets, still have unpaid internships — but important conversations questioning that common practice are finally happening across the publishing industry. Paid internships make interning here a viable option for students from low-income backgrounds: after all, many low-income students work in order to finance their studies, maintain themselves, and send money home. We are grateful to provide students from low-income backgrounds the opportunity to learn about an industry which they may have not ever thought about as a feasible career path.

And, we have made the conscious decision to review student intern applications using a holistic rubric. The many different experiences and skills that diverse applicants bring to the table will undoubtedly influence their work and the direction of the Press as a whole. We take care to hire acquisitions interns who come from the many colleges and universities across our region, including historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). (If you’re a student nearby, you can apply right now to work in our department this year!)

As coordinators of the internship program, we recognize our role in training future scholars and publishing professionals from a diverse range of backgrounds, from academic to socioeconomic. Part of this work is recognizing the daily support that we can provide our students via training, relationship-building, and upholding their voices.

It is exactly by valuing the opinions of student interns and colleagues that we can begin to expand the scope of scholarly publishing and create a culture of inclusion in the publishing industry. For instance, we’ve already seen how fruitful it can be for junior-level staff to express opinions, thoughts, and knowledge about processes and projects. One of our editors is acquiring a book that analyzes racism in the American public school system. Our summer intern, who recently graduated from a local arts high school, was able to speak to the editor about her own experience as a person of color in a predominantly white school. And we have heard student interns contribute important insights into who might be an appropriate peer reviewer or cover artist. Moreover, these students are our future acquisition editors, authors, and peer reviewers: truly including them in editorial conversations now will strengthen the scholarly publishing industry in the long term.

It is vital to the intellectual work of publishing to have queer students, students of color, students from low socioeconomic backgrounds, and student activists engaging with the literature that is oftentimes theorizing the experiences of their communities. We are excited to think about what the future of academic publishing could look like with a wide array of voices and skills coming together.

Illinois Journal of Mathematics Joins Duke University Press

Duke University Press is pleased to announce that the Illinois Journal of Mathematics (IJM) will join its publishing program beginning in 2019. IJM is edited by Steven Bradlow and sponsored by the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

IJM was founded in 1957 by Reinhold Baer, Joseph L. Doob, Abraham Taub, George Whitehead, and Oscar Zariski.  The inaugural volume featured papers of many of the world’s leading figures in the key areas of mathematics at the time: William Feller, Paul Levy, and Paul Malliavin in probability theory; Richard Bellman, R. P. Boas, Jack Hale, and Edwin Hewitt in analysis; Marvin Marcus, Olga Taussky, and Oscar Zariski in algebra; and Paul Erdös, L. J. Mordell, and John Tate in number theory. Since then, IJM has published many influential papers, including the proof of the Four Color Conjecture by Kenneth Appel and Wolfgang Haken.

The journal aims to disseminate at reasonable cost significant new, peer-reviewed results in all active areas of mathematics research. In addition to its regular editions it has published special volumes in honor of distinguished members of its host department including R. Baer, D. Burkholder, J. D’Angelo, J. Doob, P. Griffith, W. Haken, and P. Schupp. The journal’s editorial board, which counts distinguished mathematicians such as J. Bourgain, A. Calderon, S.S. Chern, H. Kesten, and K. Uhlenbeck among its past members, comprises a mix of preeminent mathematicians from within its host department and across the mathematical research establishment.

“We are proud to be associated with the outstanding Duke University Press mathematics publishing program and its flagship journal, the Duke Mathematical Journal,” said Steven Bradlow, Editor-in-Chief of IJM.

“Duke University Press is delighted to establish a partnership with the Department of Mathematics at UIUC to publish its long-established and highly regarded journal,” said Rob Dilworth, Journals Director at Duke University Press. “Positioned alongside the Duke Mathematical Journal and the other mathematics journals at Duke, we look forward to providing our expert mathematics publishing support to the editors as they and we work together to ensure that IJM continues to be a valuable resource to the entire mathematics research community.”

Duke University Press will start its publication of IJM with volume 63, which will feature a redesigned look. The first issue of the volume will be available spring of 2019. The journal will continue to be hosted online via Project Euclid.

Farewell to Jazz Great Randy Weston

We were sad to learn of the passing of pianist, composer, and Duke University Press author Randy Weston, who died in his Brooklyn home on Saturday, September 1, at the age of 92.

978-0-8223-4798-9_prThe author of African Rhythms: The Autobiography of Randy Weston, Weston was born in Brooklyn on April 6, 1926, and became one of the most innovative and unique musicians of his generation. He studied, befriended, and performed with many of jazz’s luminaries including Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Max Roach, and Melba Liston.

Weston’s illustrious career spanned seven decades and is documented on fifty albums, the first of which came out in 1952. His final album, The African Nubian Suite, was released in 2016. An indefatigable performer, Weston was always performing and touring. He played his final live show in July.

Throughout his career Weston emphasized jazz’s African roots and drew on a variety of musical traditions of the African diaspora, from Moroccan and Ghanaian to those of the Caribbean. Willard Jenkins, who coauthored African Rhythms, told NPR that “while a lot of musicians are constantly seeking something new, Randy found sustenance in ancient tradition.”

“Randy Weston was a warm and brilliant spirit,” said Weston’s editor at Duke University Press, Ken Wissoker.  “His commitments to the music and to Africa and the diaspora never wavered. His story was unique, as was he, and it was a real honor to work with him and Willard Jenkins on his memoir.”

Weston was a two-time Grammy nominee, a Guggenheim fellow, National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master, and a member of Downbeat magazine’s Hall of Fame. He is survived by his wife Fatoumata Mbengue, his three daughters, and many grandchildren. All of us who worked with Weston here at Duke University Press are proud to have a played a small part in cementing his legacy.

New Books in September

Welcome to September! As the new academic year begins, we’ve got some great new books for you to dig into.

978-1-4780-0081-5Imani Perry’s Vexy Thing recenters patriarchy to contemporary discussions of feminism through a social and literary analysis of cultural artifacts—ranging from nineteenth-century slavery court cases and historical vignettes to literature and contemporary art—from the Enlightenment to the present.

Providing a history of experimental methods and frameworks in anthropology from the 1920s to the present, Michael M. J. Fischer’s Anthropology in the Meantime draws on his real world, multi-causal, multi-scale, and multi-locale research to rebuild theory for the twenty-first century.

In Jezebel Unhinged Tamura Lomax traces the historical and contemporary use of the jezebel trope in the black church and in black popular culture, showing how it disciplines black women and girls and preserves gender hierarchy, black patriarchy, and heteronormativity in black families, communities, cultures, and institutions.

978-1-4780-0021-1.jpgGathered from Rafael Campo’s over-twenty-year-career as a poet-physician, Comfort Measures Only includes eighty-eight poems—thirty of which have never been previously published in a collection—that pull back the curtain in the ER, laying bare our pain and joining us all in spellbinding moments of pathos.

In Garbage Citizenship Rosalind Fredericks traces the volatile trash politics in Dakar, Senegal, to examine urban citizenship in the context of urban austerity and democratic politics, showing how labor is a key component of infrastructural systems and how Dakar’s residents use infrastructures as a vital tool for forging collective identifies and mobilizing political action.

Gunslinger-50Edward Dorn’s Gunslinger is an anti-epic poem that follows a cast of colorful characters as they set out the American West in search of Howard Hughes. This expanded fiftieth anniversary edition of Dorn’s wild and comedic romp includes a new foreword by Marjorie Perloff, an essay by Michael Davidson, and Charles Olson’s “Bibliography on America for Ed Dorn”.

In Technicolored Black feminist critic Ann duCille combines cultural critique with personal reflections on growing up with TV as a child in the Boston suburbs to examine how televisual representations of African Americans—ranging from I Love Lucy to How to Get Away with Murder—have changed over the last sixty years.

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