World Anthropology Day 2020

Anthro Day

Happy World Anthropology Day! Duke University Press joins the American Anthropological Association to recognize the research and achievements of anthropologists around the world. Celebrate the rich contributions of anthropology and  the exciting possibilities for the discipline’s future with our new and recent titles.

Avian ReservoirsIn the timely new book Avian Reservoirs, Frédéric Keck traces how the anticipation of bird flu pandemics has changed relations between birds and humans in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan, showing that humans’ reliance on birds is key to mitigating future pandemics.

Macarthur “genius” grant winner Julie Livingston shows how the global pursuit of economic and resource-driven growth comes at the expense of catastrophic destruction in her latest book, Self-Devouring Growth, thereby upending popular notions that economic growth and development is necessary for improving a community’s wellbeing.

In another newsworthy recent work, Fencing in Democracy, Margaret E. Dorsey and Miguel Díaz-Barriga argue that border wall construction along the U.S.–Mexico border manifests transformations in citizenship practices that are aimed not only at keeping migrants out but also enmeshing citizens into a wider politics of exclusion.

Decolonizing EthnographyAlso examining the experiences of migrants, Decolonizing Ethnography, co-authors Carolina Alonso Bejarano and Daniel M. Goldstein team up with Lucia López Juárez and Mirian A. Mijangos García, both immigrant workers themselves,  to show how to integrate ethnography with activist work. Their fieldwork in a New Jersey center for undocumented workers shows how anthropology can function as a vehicle for activism and as a tool for marginalized people to theorize their own experiences.

In A Possible Anthropology, Anand Pandian offers an ethnography of anthropologists at work: canonical figures like Bronislaw Malinowski and Claude Lévi-Strauss, ethnographic storytellers like Zora Neale Hurston and Ursula K. Le Guin, contemporary scholars like Jane Guyer and Michael Jackson, and artists and indigenous activists inspired by the field. In their company, Pandian explores the moral and political horizons of anthropological inquiry, the creative and transformative potential of an experimental practice.

Political Life in the Wake of the Plantation by Deborah A. Thomas uses the 2010 military and police incursion into the Kingston, Jamaica, Tivoli Gardens neighborhood as a point of departure for theorizing the roots of contemporary state violence in Jamaica and other post-plantation societies.

Progressive DystopiaSavannah Shange traces the afterlives of slavery as lived in a progressive high school set in post-gentrification San Francisco in Progressive Dystopia. Despite the school’s sincere antiracism activism, she shows how it unintentionally perpetuated antiblackness through various practices.

Focusing on Costa Rica and Brazil, Andrea Ballestero examines the legal, political, economic, and bureaucratic history of water in the context of the efforts to classify it as a human right, showing how seemingly small scale devices such as formulas and lists play large role in determining water’s status in A Future History of Water.

In A Revolution in Fragments Mark Goodale uses contemporary Bolivia as an ideal case study with which to theorize the role that political agency, identity, and economic equality play within movements for justice and structural change.

Otaku and the StruggleIn Otaku and the Struggle for Imagination in Japan, Patrick Galbraith examines Japanese “otaku,” their relationships with fictional girl characters, the Japanese public’s interpretations of them as excessive and perverse, and the Japanese government’s attempts to co-opt them into depictions of “Cool Japan” to an international audience.

In Ethnography #9, Alan Klima examines moneylending, gambling, funeral casinos, and the consultations of spirits and mediums to predict winning lottery numbers to illustrate the relationship between contemporary Thai spiritual and financial practices and global capitalism’s abstraction of monetary value. Klima uses an unconventional, distinctive, and literary form of storytelling in this experimental new work.

Check out our full list of anthropology titles, and sign up here to be notified of new books, special discounts, and more. Share your love of anthropology on social media with the hashtag #AnthroDay today.

 

Black History Month Reads

To celebrate Black History Month, we are featuring some of our recent books and journals that explore Black and African-American history, issues, and culture.

Honeypot

In Honeypot, E. Patrick Johnson combines magical realism, poetry, and performative writing to bear witness to the real-life stories of black southern queer women in ways that reveal the complexity of identity and the challenges these women face.

The concluding volume in a poetic triptych that began with Spill, and continued with M Archive, Alexis Pauline Gumbs’s Dub: Finding Ceremony takes inspiration from theorist Sylvia Wynter, dub poetry, and ocean life to offer a catalog of possible methods for remembering, healing, listening, and living otherwise.

In Everything Man, Shana L. Redmond traces Paul Robeson’s continuing cultural resonances in popular culture and politics, showing how he remains a vital force and presence for all those he inspired.

afterlife ofIn The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery, Alys Eve Weinbaum investigates the continuing resonances of Atlantic slavery in the cultures and politics of human reproduction that characterize contemporary capitalism, showing how black feminist thought offers the best means through which to understand the myriad ways slavery continues to haunt the present.

Allyson Nadia Field and Marsha Gordon examine the place and role of race in educational films, home movies, industry and government films, anthropological films, church films, and other forms of noncommercial filmmaking throughout the twentieth century in Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film.

Peoples History of DetroitMark Jay and Philip Conklin use a Marxist framework to tell a sweeping story of Detroit from 1913 to the present in A People’s History of Detroit, which comes out in May. It outlines the complex socio-political dynamics underlying major events in Detroit’s past, from the rise of Fordism and the formation of labor unions to deindustrialization and the city’s recent bankruptcy. 

In Art for People’s Sake, Rebecca Zorach traces the little-told story of the Black Arts Movement in Chicago, showing how its artistic innovations, institution building, and community engagement helped the residents of Chicago’s South and West Sides respond to social, political, and economic marginalization.

In Black Madness :: Mad Blackness, Therí Alyce Pickens examines the speculative and science fiction of Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, and Tananarive Due to rethink the relationship between race and disability, thereby unsettling the common theorization that they are mutually constitutive.

UnfixedJennifer Bajorek traces the relationship between photography and decolonial politics in Francophone west Africa in the years immediately leading up to and following independence from French colonial rule in 1960 in Unfixed. She shows how photography both reflected and actively contributed to social and political change. 

In Beneath the Surface, Lynn M. Thomas constructs a transnational history of skin lighteners in South Africa and beyond theorizing skin and skin color as a site for antiracist struggle and lighteners as a technology of visibility that both challenges and entrenches racial and gender hierarchies.

Beyond countering the brutalizing omission of black British artists in both the art scene and art history chronicles, “Black British Art Histories,” an issue of Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, presents perceptive, probing, and illuminating considerations of a range of artists whose practices are fascinating, complex, and of great art-historical importance.

The essays in “Trajectories in Race and Diaspora: Entangled Histories and Affinities of Transgression,” an issue of Qui Parle edited by Donna Honarpisheh, unfold at the dynamic intersections of race and diaspora in a global context. Each essay is preoccupied with how race—as an ontological category born of violence—produces edges, wounds, or incisions that nurture opportunities for further ontological transgressions with possible liberatory potentials.

The Return of Economic Planning

“The Return of Economic Planning,” the latest issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, edited by Campbell Jones, is available now.

Contributors to this special issue propose placing economic planning firmly back on the agenda of Left politics. Today, capital and the capitalist state are fully planned, yet economic planning remains a key site of political struggle, and it exists in diverse places and forms—in algorithms, in sites of dispute, in communes, in music, and coming from above or below.

The authors explore new ways of seeing and thinking about economic planning, arguing that the question is no longer whether or not to plan but rather what kind of economic planning is taking place, what purpose it is serving, and who is included in making and executing plans.

Check out authors Matteo Mandarini and Alberto Toscano’s article, “Planning for Conflict,” freely available for three months.

The issue’s Against the Day section, “Mediterranea: Sea Rescue as Political Action,” brings together researchers and activists to discuss migrant projects of freedom. All articles in this section are freely available for six months.

Browse the issue’s contents and read the introduction, freely available.

Revolutionary Positions: Gender and Sexuality in Cuba and Beyond

As the Cuban revolution reaches its 60th anniversary, “Revolutionary Positions: Gender and Sexuality in Cuba and Beyond,” a new issue of Radical History Review edited by Michelle Chase and Isabella Cosse, offers an exploration of the revolution’s impact through the lens of sexuality and gender.

The contributors to this issue study Cuban internationalist campaigns, the relationship between cultural diplomacy and mass media, and visual images of revolution and solidarity. They follow the emergence and negotiation of new gender ideals through the transgendering of Che’s “New Man,” the Cuban travels of Angela Davis, calls for sexual revolution in the Dutch Atlantic, and gender representations during the 1964 “Campaign of Terror” in Chile. In doing so, the authors provide fresh insight into Cuba’s transnational legacy on politics and culture during the Cold War and beyond.

Browse the table of contents, and start reading with Sarah J. Seidman’s article “Angela Davis in Cuba as Symbol and Subject,” free through the end of May.

You may also enjoy Isabella Cosse’s book Mafalda: A Social and Political History of Latin America’s Global Comic, first published in Argentina in 2014 and now available in English, which analyzes the vast appeal of the Argentinian comic Mafalda and its exploration of complex topics such as class identity, modernization, and state violence.

Winter Awards

We’d like to celebrate our many authors who have garnered awards for their books this winter. Congratulations!

Zeb Tortorici’s book Sins against Nature has won the Alan Bray Memorial Book Award from The Gay and Lesbian Caucus of the Modern Language Association. This book also won the NECLAS Marysa Navarro Best Book Prize from the New England Council of Latin American Studies (NECLAS).

Sasha Su-Ling Welland’s book Experimental Beijing has won the Francis L K Hsu Prize from the Society for East Asian Anthropology (SEAA) Section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA).

Licia Fiol-Matta’s book The Great Woman Singer has co-won the MLA Prize in US Latina/o and Chicana/o Literary and Cultural Studies from the Modern Language Association (MLA).

Leticia Alvarado’s book Abject Performances has received an honorable mention for the MLA Prize in US Latina/o and Chicana/o Literary and Cultural Studies from the Modern Language Association (MLA).

Christopher Taylor’s book Empire of Neglect has won the Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize from the American Studies Association (ASA).

Juno Salazar Parreñas’s book Decolonizing Extinction has received an honorable mention for the New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA) Section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA).

Noenoe K. Silva’s book The Power of the Steel-tipped Pen has won the Ka Palapala Po’okela Award from the Hawaii Book Publishers Association.

Jason Borge’s book Tropical Riffs has won the Robert M. Stevenson Prize from the American Musicological Association (AMS).

Bianca C. Williams’s book The Pursuit of Happiness has won the Nelson Graburn Book Award from the Anthropology Tourism Interest Group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA).

Eliza Steinbock’s book Shimmering Images has won the SCMS Best First Book Award from the Society for Cinema & Media Studies (SCMS).

Esther Gabara’s book Pop América, 1965–1975 was selected as a finalist for The Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award from the College Art Association (CAA).

Renisa Mawani’s book Across Oceans of Law was selected as a finalist for The Socio-Legal Theory and History Prize from the Socio-Legal Studies Association.

Rosalind Fredericks’s book Garbage Citizenship has won the Toyin Falola Africa Book Award from the Association of Third World Studies (ATWS).

On Ideological Transparency

Congratulations to Pedagogy for reaching its twentieth anniversary! The journal’s new issue, “On Ideological Transparency,” celebrates this milestone by exploring the neutrality/advocate dichotomy in classroom discourse.

The editors look back on a 2017 call for papers for a special issue which, they had hoped, would explore how teachers’ ideological commitments and the extents to which they make these transparent in the classroom have changed, shifted, or stayed the same throughout the years.

“We envisioned an eclectic special issue populated by different perspectives on the topic—not with the intent of categorization but to show the variegated nature of our community’s ideological commitments (which, from our perspective, at times can get rather hegemonic in nature),” the editors write in their introduction.

What they experienced instead, they write, was “unique, often emotionally charged perspectives into the challenges of teaching in our sociopolitical moment, largely written to audiences who were assumed not to be in need of persuasion.”

This twentieth-anniversary issue presents the articles they had received, sequenced to respond to one another and invite readers to encounter an idea and then perhaps experience destabilization.

Read a note from the founding co-editors and the introduction, freely available.

Economic Knowledge in Socialism, 1945–1989

Economic Knowledge in Socialism, 1945–1989” edited by Till Düppe and Ivan Boldyrev, a supplement to volume 51 of History of Political Economy, is now available.

While the development of economics in the U.S. during the Cold War has been subject to many studies, scholars from various disciplines have only recently begun exploring the other kind of economics during the same period: the economics in the Soviet Union and other socialist countries. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, this research has benefited not only from the newly open archives, but also from a more open environment for the sharing of memories and reminiscences. “Economic Knowledge in Socialism, 1945–1989” represents an exemplary cross-disciplinary effort for better understanding various domains of economic knowledge and, more broadly, the social sciences in the Eastern bloc.

“How does a socialist economy function and how can it best be managed? The essays in this rich and fascinating volume excavate how economists throughout the socialist world worked to create the conceptual and institutional tools they needed to approach these questions. By uncovering the diverse legacies of economic thought under socialism, the authors in this collection not only contribute to our understanding of the socialist past, but encourage us to question contemporary economic orthodoxies.” —Melissa Feinberg, Rutgers University

“This volume explodes the protective shield that has long kept the history of socialist experts a world apart, seemingly unrelated to anything outside it. The articles collected in this excellent volume draw upon exciting advances in science studies and intellectual history to demonstrate that the forms of economic knowledge seemingly peculiar to socialist governance were, in fact, strongly influenced by the pre-socialist tradition of economic expertise in Eastern Europe, as well as by reciprocal exchanges with Western capitalist experts. In the process, the volume also paints a fascinating gallery of flesh-and-blood socialist experts, neither subservient mouthpieces of official dogma nor courageous dissidents, but ordinary individuals caught up in an extraordinary ideological machinery.” —Gil Eyal, Columbia University

Read the issue’s free introduction and its table of contents, or purchase the issue.

New Books in February

This month, we’re releasing an array of new reads in all of the subjects you love. Take a look at these new books coming this February!

The concluding volume in a poetic triptych, Alexis Pauline Gumbs’s Dub: Finding Ceremony takes inspiration from theorist Sylvia Wynter, dub poetry, and ocean life to offer a catalog of possible methods for remembering, healing, listening, and living otherwise.

In Wild Blue Media, Melody Jue destabilizes terrestrial-based media theory frameworks and reorients the perception of the world by considering the ocean itself as a media environment—a place where the weight and opacity of seawater transforms how information is created, stored, transmitted, and perceived.

In The Ocean in the School, Rick Bonus tells the stories of Pacific Islander students at the University of Washington as they and their allies struggled to transform a university they believed did not value their presence into a space based on meaningfulness, respect, and multiple notions of student success.

In Orozco’s American Epic, Mary K. Coffey examines José Clemente Orozco’s mural cycle Epic of American Civilization, which indicts history as complicit in colonial violence and questions the claims of Manifest Destiny in the United States and the Mexican desire to mend the wounds of conquest in pursuit of a postcolonial national project.

Nandita Sharma traces the development of the categories of migrants and natives from the nineteenth century to the present in Home Rule to theorize how the idea of people’s rights being tied to geographical notions of belonging came to be.

In Unfixed, Jennifer Bajorek traces the relationship between photography and decolonial politics in Francophone west Africa in the years immediately leading up to and following independence from French colonial rule in 1960, showing how photography both reflected and actively contributed to social and political change.

In Are You Entertained?, a collection of essays, interviews, visual art, and artist statements on topics ranging from music and dance to Black Twitter and the NBA’s dress code, the contributors consider what culture and Blackness mean in the twenty-first century’s digital consumer economy. This volume is edited by Simone C. Drake and Dwan K. Henderson.

In Musicophilia in Mumbai, Tejaswini Niranjana traces the place of Hindustani classical music in Mumbai throughout the long twentieth century, showing how the widespread love of music throughout the city created a culture of collective listening and social subjects who embodied new forms of modernity.

Focusing on the work of a Marxist anticolonial literary group active in India between the 1930s and 1950s, Neetu Khanna rethinks the project of decolonization in The Visceral Logics of Decolonization by showing how embodied and affective responses to colonial subjugation provide the catalyst for developing revolutionary consciousness.

Contributors to Queer Korea, edited by Todd A. Henry, offer interdisciplinary analyses of non-normative sexuality and gender nonconformity in Korea, extending individualized notions of queer neoliberalism beyond those set in Western queer theory.

Drawing on Marxist phenomenology, geography, and aesthetics and film from China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan made between the 1990s and the present, Erin Y. Huang theorizes the economic, cultural, and political conditions of neoliberal postsocialist China in Urban Horror.

The contributors to Affective Trajectories examine the mutual and highly complex entwinements between religion and affect in urban Africa in the early twenty-first century, tracing the myriad ways religious ideas, practices, and materialities interact with affect to configure life in urban African spaces. This collection is edited by Hansjörg Dilger, Astrid Bochow, Marian Burchardt, and Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon.

In Naked Agency, Naminata Diabate explores how the deployment of defiant nakedness by mature women in Africa challenges longstanding assumptions about women’s political agency.

From The Guiding Light to Passions, Elana Levine traces the history of daytime television soap operas as an innovative and highly gendered mass cultural form in Her Stories.

In Seeing by Electricity, Doron Galili traces television’s early history, from the fantastical devices initially imagined fifty years before the first television prototypes to the emergence of broadcast television in the 1930s, showing how television was always discussed and treated in relation to cinema.

Jeremy Packer and Joshua Reeves provide a critical account of the history and future of automation in warfare in Killer Apps by highlighting the threats posed by the latest advances in media technology and artificial intelligence.

Originally published in German in 1978 and appearing here in English for the first time, the second volume of Peter Weiss’s three-volume novel The Aesthetics of Resistance depicts anti-fascist resistance, radical proletarian political movements, and the relationship between art and resistance from the late 1930s to World War II.

Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop by Sarah Eckhardt accompanies the exhibition of the photography of Virginia artist Louis Draper and other members of the Kamoinge Workshop that opens at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in February 2020. We are distributing it for the museum.

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Author Events in February

Many of our authors are on the road around the world in February with brand new books.

Unspoken as HeritageFebruary 1: See What Comes after Entanglement? author Eva Haifa Giraud in a transmediale Symposium panel.
11:30am, Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH, Klosterstrasse 68, D-10179 Berlin, Germany

February 6: Isabella Cosse speaks on her new book Mafalda at the UCL Institute of the Americas.
6:00pm, IAS Common Ground, Ground Floor, South Wing , UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT

February 6: Harry Harootunian will speak about his new book The Unspoken as Heritage at the John Hope Franklin Institute at Duke University.
3:30pm, 114 S. Buchanan Blvd, Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, C105, Durham, NC 27708

February 6: Sara Ahmed, whose most recent book is What’s the Use? lectures about her next project “On Complaint” at Miami University.
7:00pm Kislack Center, 1300 Memorial DriveCoral Gables, FL, 33146

February 7: The John Hope Franklin Institute hosts a conversation about postmodernism, including Fredric Jameson’s classic text Postmodernism, or The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism that includes Jameson and other Duke University Press authors Lauren Berlant, Achille Mbembe, and Harry Harootunian.
1:00pm, Nelson Music Room, 1304 Campus Drive, Durham, NC 27708

978-1-4780-0298-7_prFebruary 7: Landscapes of Power author Dana E. Powell will give talk at Yale University.
11:00am, 230 Prospect St, Room 101, New Haven, CT 06511

February  7: Catch E. Patrick Johnson discussing his new book Honeypot with Omi Osun Joni L. Jones at Skylight Books.7:30pm, 1818 N Vermont Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90027

February 10: The University of Notre Dame will host a lecture with Orozco′s American Epic author Mary K. Coffey.
4:30pm, 306 Riley Hall of Art & Design, Notre Dame, IN 46556

February 10: Laura Hyun Yi Kang, author of the forthcoming book Traffic in Asian Women (September 2020), is participating in the panel Facing ‘Comfort Women’: Representations and Reckonings,” at NYU’s A/P/A Institute.
6:30pm, NYU Silver Center, Jurow Hall & Silverstein Lounge31 Washington Place, 1st Floor, New York, NY 10003

978-1-4780-0645-9_pr

February 11: Dub author Alexis Pauline Gumbs will be in-conversation with Staceyann Chin and Kaiama L. Glover at Barnard College.
6:30pm, Event Oval, Diana Center, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027

February 11: David Grubbs reads from his forthcoming book The Voice in the Headphones at Wesleyan University.
12:30pm, Adzenyah Rehearsal Hall 003 (Daltry Room), 45 Wyllys Avenue Middletown, CT 06459

February 13: The University of Cambridge will host a book launch for Sara Ahmed’s new book What’s the Use?
5:30pm, St Johns St, Cambridge CB2 1TP, United Kingdom

February 15: Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film editors Allyson Nadia Field and Marsha Gordon will host a talk and screening at the National Gallery of Art.
2:00pm, 6th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20565

February 18: Villanova University will host a lecture by Everything Man author Shana Redmond.
6:30pm, 800 E. Lancaster Ave, Villanova, PA 19085

February 18: Sara Ahmed lectures on “Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work”in Brussels.
8:00pm, Kaaitheater, Sainctelette Square 20 1000 Brussels, Belgium

February 23: E. Patrick Johnson will talk about his book Honeypot at Glee Books.
3:30pm, 49 Glebe Point Road Glebe, NSW 2037, Sydney, Australia

February 23: Worldmaking author Dorinne Kondo will have a book signing at the reading of her play “Seamless” at the USC Visions and Voices.
4:00pm, 837 Downey Way, Stonier Hall 203, Los Angeles, CA 90089

February 28: Sara Ahmed gives a lecture entitled  “‘If these Doors Could Talk’: Complaint, Diversity, Institutions,”at the University of East Anglia.
3:00pm, Lecture Theatre block, UEA, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, Norfolk, NR4 7TJ

-30- The End of the Story

Congratulations to differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies on reaching its thirtieth anniversary! The journal’s new issue “-30- The End of the Story” marks the occasion, borrowing the “-30-” mark that journalists in North America traditionally have used to indicate the end of a story.

“While one might debate whether or not the story of critical feminism itself has come to an end, there is no question that much has changed in the field. We invited contributors to reflect on the critical preoccupations that have happily or unhappily expired over the years, which ones they might like to see go—or not,” write the editors.

Check out the issue’s contents, including Thangam Ravindranathan’s “The Rise of the Sea and The Novel,” a speculative reflection on literary fiction’s ability to register the effects of climate change, which is free through April.