Althusser’s 100th Birthday

Today is the 100th birthday of Marxist philosopher Louis Althusser, whose thought has been greatly influential to many Duke University Press scholars. We’re pleased to share a selection of scholarship connected to his work.

978-0-8223-7024-6In Althusser, The Infinite Farewell, Emilio de Ípola contends that Althusser’s oeuvre is divided between two fundamentally different and at times contradictory projects. Reading For Marx and Reading Capital alongside Althusser’s lesser-known writings, de Ípola reveals a subterranean current of thought that flows throughout Althusser’s classic formulations, which leads Althusser to move toward an aleatory materialism, or a materialism of the encounter. De Ípola revitalizes classic debates concerning major theoretico-political topics, including the relationship between Marxism, structuralism, and psychoanalysis; the difference between ideology, philosophy, and science; and the role of contingency and subjectivity in political encounters and social transformation.

978-0-8223-6907-3The publication of Reading Capital—by Louis Althusser, Étienne Balibar, Roger Establet, Pierre Macherey, and Jacques Rancière—in 1965 marked a key intervention in Marxist philosophy and critical theory, bringing forth a stunning array of concepts that continue to inspire philosophical reflection of the highest magnitude. The contributors to The Concept in Crisis—who include Alain Badiou, Étienne Balibar, and Fernanda Navarro—reconsider the volumes reading of Marx, interrogating Althussers’s contributions in particular, and renew its call for a critique of capitalism and culture for the twenty-first century. Retrieving the inspiration that drove Althusser’s reinterpretation of Marx, The Concept in Crisis explains why Reading Capital’s revolutionary inflection retains its critical appeal, prompting readers to reconsider Marx’s relevance in an era of neoliberal capitalism.

978-0-8223-6296-8Although Haitian revolutionaries were not the intended audience for the Declaration of the Rights of Man, they heeded its call, demanding rights that were not meant for them. This failure of the French state to address only its desired subjects is an example of the phenomenon James R. Martel labels “misinterpellation.” Complicating Althusser’s famous theory, Martel explores the ways that such failures hold the potential for radical and anarchist action. The Misinterpellated Subject reveals how calls by authority are inherently vulnerable to radical possibilities, thereby suggesting that all people at all times are filled with revolutionary potential.

978-0-8223-5400-0Based on meticulous study of Althusser’s posthumous publications, as well as his unpublished manuscripts, lecture notes, letters, and marginalia, in Althusser and His Contemporaries Warren Montag provides a thoroughgoing reevaluation of Althusser’s philosophical project. Montag shows that the theorist was intensely engaged with the work of his contemporaries, particularly Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, and Lacan. Examining Althusser’s philosophy as a series of encounters with his peers’ thought, Montag sheds new light on structuralism, poststructuralism, and the extraordinary moment of French thought in the 1960s and 1970s.

DIF_26_3_prMost readers of Althusser first enter his work through his writings on ideology. In an essay published in a special issue of differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, Étienne Balibar offers an original reading of Althusser’s idea of ideology, drawing on both recently published posthumous writing and Althusser’s work on the Piccolo Teatro di Milano. Balibar’s essay uncovers the intricate workings of interpellation through Althusser’s essays on the theater. The issue includes commentaries on Balibar’s essay from five influential scholars who engage critically with Althusser’s philosophy: Judith Butler, Banu Bargu, Adi Ophir, Warren Montag, and Bruce Robbins. Read Balibar’s essay, made freely available.

Science and Literature in North and South Korea

coverimageThe most recent issue of the Journal of Korean Studies, “Science and Literature in North and South Korea,” edited by Christopher P. Hanscom and Dafna Zur, is now available.

This issue offers a groundbreaking framework for approaching the multilayered relations between literature and science both in Korea and in other sites in the modern world. Paying particular attention to the ways in which literature and science share a linguistic medium, the nine articles that comprise this special issue show how literature and science interconnect as modes of understanding and perceiving the world. This issue is a must-read not only for specialists in modern Korean literature but also for scholars of modern Korea working across all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Browse the table-of-contents and read the introduction, made freely available.

Design Principles for Teaching History

Today we’re pleased to showcase the four books that currently comprise our Design Principles for Teaching History series, edited by Antoinette Burton. The most recent addition, A Primer for Teaching Women, Gender, and Sexuality in World History, is newly available this season.

Books in this series provide a guide for college and secondary school teachers who are teaching a particular field of history for the first time, for experienced teachers who want to reinvigorate their courses, for those who are training future teachers to prepare their own syllabi, and for teachers who want to incorporate specific topics into their history courses. These books are not intended to serve as a textbook nor advocate a particular school of thought. Rather, informed by the authors’ experiences in the classroom, they provide a guide to developing a syllabus around an integrated set of arguments and conceptual orientations. Ideal for teachers of all experience levels, the titles in this series help translate expert knowledge of a field into effective and thoughtful pedagogical strategies for a range of practitioners.

The series currently includes A Primer for Teaching World History, edited by Antoinette Burton; A Primer for Teaching African History, edited by Trevor Getz; A Primer for Teaching Environmental History, edited by Emily Wakild and Michelle K. Berry; and A Primer for Teaching Women, Gender, and Sexuality in World History, edited by Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks and Urmi Engineer Willoughby.

ckn_24_3_coverAlso of interest is a newly published issue of Common Knowledge: the second part of a two-part symposium titled “In the Humanities Classroom.” The first set of case studies described particular pedagogical experiences rather than simply making general arguments about the value of the humanities. In its recently published second set of case studiesCommon Knowledge continues this approach of describing in detail the excitement and discovery that can occur in a particular humanities class but also expands upon the first to include the voices of graduate students and an undergraduate and to delineate the process by which one teacher put together an online course. This special section argues that descriptions of specific classroom experiences and of the careful planning and passionate commitment of teachers may help to cling to the moral values both professors and their students seem to need and want in troubled times. Article topics include “Teaching Western Civilization,” “Teaching an Online Course,” and “When History Meets Politics.”

Congratulations to MacArthur Fellow Wu Tsang

Congratulations to filmmaker and performance artist Wu Tsang on winning a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship. Tsang is the co-author (with Fred Moten) of “Sudden Rise at a Given Tune,” the textual component of an eponymous performance by Tsang and Moten given at the Tate Modern, London on March 25, 2017. The text is featured in our journal South Atlantic Quarterly and is openly available for three months.

Tsang was the writer, director, and editor of—as well as a central character in—the 2012 feature film Wildness, which was reviewed in Transgender Studies Quarterly. Read the article here, where it is openly available for three months. She has also created a number of other films that have been exhibited or screened in many venues around the world.

The MacArthur Foundation praises Tsang for reimagining “racialized, gendered representations beyond the visible frame to encompass the multiple and shifting perspectives through which we experience the social realm.”

Watch a video of Tsang discussing her work:

On Meridians: An Interview with Ginetta E. B. Candelario and Leslie Marie Aguilar

We are proud to be the new publisher of Meridians: feminism, race, and transnationalism. “Black Lives Matter” (volume 17, issue 1), the first issue published by Duke University Press, is now availablecoverimage. We recently sat down with editor Ginetta E. B. Candelario, Professor of Sociology and Latin American & Latino/a Studies at Smith College, and editorial assistant Leslie Marie Aguilar to discuss their vision for the journal’s future.

DUP: Tell us a bit about the journal’s mission.

GinettaMeridians was founded almost twenty years ago now, explicitly with the mandate and mission to publish scholarship by and about women of color, feminisms, and transnationalisms. Therefore, our philosophy is to offer a venue for interdisciplinary scholarship focused on the intersections of gender, race, sexuality, class, citizenship, etc. not only in the United States, but also, more broadly, transnationally and internationally. This is connected to supporting and growing the pipeline of women of color scholars and knowledge producers who are woefully underrepresented in the US academy, often in part because the questions they ask, the methodologies they use, and their theories are not status-quo-maintaining questions, methodologies, and theories. Which means that prior to Meridians, there were very few traditional disciplinary journals that were interested in their work, or that would recognize the value of the work they were doing. So like Signs, Feminist Studies, and so forth, Meridians had a broader demographic and professional development vision.

However, unlike those other feminist publications, we have always been intersectional. From the beginning, we were interested in thinking about race, nation, and transnationalism. Accordingly, our editorial philosophy is to showcase work that is fundamentally interdisciplinary, even if it’s being produced by scholars, such as myself, who might also have a disciplinary home. I’m a sociologist who is also a Latin Americanist, a Latin@ studies scholar, and a women’s studies scholar. I embrace my sociology identity, but I have never published in a sociology journal, and I probably wouldn’t, because it’s typically not a welcoming intellectual space or a home for the kind of work that I’m interested in doing.

We think women of color epistemologies are expressed through multiple genres. Meridians is unique in the sense that it offers a space for both evidence-based, research-based scholarship alongside creative and cultural work—everything from poetry to visual images, whether it’s photography, or paintings, or one-dimensional reproductions of three-dimensional works, to memoir and creative non-fiction kinds of work. We view each of these genres as equally valuable forms of knowledge. In any given issue, you’ll see a research-based piece followed by a poem that is speaking to similar or related concerns that the research piece is exploring in another way. So the philosophy then is really to showcase women of color knowledge production in all these genres and all these forms.

Leslie: This philosophy also drives our desire to increase creative writing as a key component of Meridians. Part of my being brought on board, as a poet, was to vet creative writing and poetry submissions, but it was also to increase Meridians’s visibility within my own networks and within the larger group of activist artists as well. Bridging the gap that typically exists between scholars, activists, and artists is what we’re hoping to accomplish with Meridians. I think that’s a great way that our roles complement one another—Ginetta is the scholar and I’m the creative writer.

So even on our masthead, it’s apparent that we’re trying to create and curate an intersectional space for knowledge production. That’s our vision moving forward, to braid all of these ideas in different forms of knowledge production into the cohesive project that is Meridians.

Moreover, we are committed to making the content of our journal as openly available as possible. Our recently redesigned website will showcase multimedia work related to our published content. So, for example, one of our contributors from 17:1 submitted a poem that is actually a spoken word piece. It’s one dimensional when it’s on the page; but instead of having the poem remain a static object, we invited the contributor to record herself performing the piece. We plan to host her recording on our website so that it is openly available to subscribers and would-be readers of the journal. This endeavor is meant to highlight the different ways our readership encounters the pieces published in Meridians. You don’t necessarily just have to experience them on the written page. There are different emotions elicited whether you are reading an article, or seeing a photograph, or hearing a spoken-word poem. So, in a lot of ways it’s an activist agenda.

DUP:  Ginetta, tell us about your role as editor and your overall goals for the publication.

Ginetta: I am the fourth faculty editor of the journal. However, I’ve been involved with Meridians from its inception actually, because I joined the faculty at Smith College just after Meridians was conceived, if you will, and was there when it was birthed on campus. It’s the brainchild, the baby, of what used to be the Women’s Studies program. The first editorial group was a collective of Smith faculty (whose names are listed on our masthead, by the way). From there they expanded into a Smith-Wesleyan collective because Wesleyan University Press agreed to publish Meridians. Thus, after I was published in Meridians Volume 1, Number 1, I became part of what was then the Smith-Wesleyan Editorial Group.

Now, as editor, my role is establishing the intellectual vision of the journal moving forward. I’m a Latin Americanist who also does Afro-diasporic work, a Latin@ studies scholar who does feminist work, and a women’s studies scholar who does woman of color work, so my networks are somewhat different than my predecessors. I am really interested in growing the existing transnational part of our journal’s mandate and, by extension, its multilingualism. Having languages other than English represented in our submissions, whether those are scholarly essays or creative work, is important to us. We are moving in that direction already.

DUP: What are some of the highlights over the past year in your role as editor?

Ginetta: We recently transitioned to Duke University Press, so our first year working together was really about closing out the relationship with our former publisher and fulfilling commitments. In some ways Leslie’s and my first issues were 16:1 and 16:2, but they didn’t feel like they were truly ours, because we were finishing someone else’s recipe. That’s why in my “Editor’s Introduction” to 17:1, I say that it really feels like our first issue—because we curated it fully, and those contributions came in under our editorship.

Another highlight is that we’ve reconstituted our Editorial Advisory Board into a Smith-Duke board to honor and celebrate the relationship with Duke University Press.

Finally, we also instituted the Paula J. Giddings Best Essay Award that we’ll be presenting for the first time at this year’s National Women’s Studies Association conference. Paula will be present to deliver the award to the junior scholar whose article was selected by our Editorial Advisory Board.

Leslie: Another highlight for the journal has been bringing back student internships and providing cocurricular opportunities for Smith College students. We are providing pathways to professionalization, consistent with Meridians’s mandate to mentor women of color. Reinstituting these internships is one way that we’re amplifying Smith’s mission to educate women of promise for lives of distinction, but also to diversify the pipeline for the larger publishing community. Seeing our interns blossom has been a highlight for me as their supervisor, and I am looking forward to seeing where they’ll go after having Meridians as a guide and a reference. That’s been something we’ve been really proud of this past year.

DUP: How do you see the journal evolving over the next few years?

Ginetta: A central agenda for us is to internationalize the transnational aspect of the journal. One of the things that we are moving to next, in terms of our priorities, is reconfiguring our Transnational Advisory Board so that half of the board comprises scholars, cultural workers, and knowledge producers located outside the United States, in the major regions of Africa, in the Indian subcontinent, in China, the Middle East, and the Asian Pacific Island area. Not only will they contribute to the work we’re doing, but Meridians will be visible in the worlds that these individuals are inhabiting as knowledge producers across the globe. The hope is not just that we will be part of the conversations that are happening in those places but also that folks producing there will send their submissions to us. That is one of our big agendas: growing our international presence and the presence of the international in our journal.

Leslie: Also, part of our forward vision is to highlight the founding goals of Meridians. This is evident in our decision to bring back subsections—“In the Archives,” “Counterpoint,” “Media Matters,” etc.—within the journal. There’s something sort of poetic in that choice, a retrospective looking back in order to see where we’re headed.

DUP: Tell me more about your first fully curated issue of Meridians.

Ginetta: “Black Lives Matter,” Volume 17, Number 1, is the first issue that we fully curated. It is a black women’s activism and resiliency issue, because that’s where we’re at in this historical moment. This issue both commemorates and historicizes the presence and work of these feminists in the US and elsewhere across the world and their ties to us—the fact that we are part of a broader international transnational feminist community of knowledge producers, and that we’ve been influencing one another and supporting one another. We’re trying to honor and commemorate while also sustain hope moving forward. We’re very excited about the issue.

DUP: Is there anything else that you’d like to share with our readers?

Leslie: We’re in the process of developing a creative writing award at the moment. If you’re accepted into the journal you’re automatically in the pool of applicants for this particular award. We’re still working on the finer details, but that’s where Meridians is hoping to go, in order to highlight the creative aspect of Meridians, and showcase it a bit more moving forward.

 

 

Congratulations to MacArthur Fellow Lisa Parks

Parks_2018_hi-res-download_smallCongratulations to MIT media scholar Lisa Parks on winning a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship! Parks is the co-editor (with Caren Kaplan) of the recent book Life in the Age of Drone Warfare and co-editor (with Elana Levine) of the 2007 collection Undead TV: Essays on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. She has also contributed essays to several other collections we have published.

Parks is the author of the 2005 book Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual. The MacArthur Foundation calls it “a groundbreaking analysis of satellite use, including live international transmissions, 978-0-8223-3497-2_pr
archeological excavations via remote sensing, and satellite images documenting mass graves in Srebrenica during the Bosnian conflict.”

The MacArthur Foundation praises Parks for “extending the parameters of media studies and revealing the ways in which media technologies have come increasingly to define our everyday lives, politics, and culture.”

Watch a video of Parks discussing her work:

New Books in October

It’s October and our fall publishing season is in full swing. Check out all the great books coming out this month.

The contributors to The Apartment Complex, edited by Pamela Robertson Wojcik, offer global perspectives on films from a diverse set of genres—from film noir and comedy to horror and musicals—that use apartment living to explore modern urbanism’s various forms and possibilities.

978-1-4780-0130-0In See It Feelingly Ralph James Savarese showcases the voices of autistic readers by sharing their unique insights into literature and their sensory experiences of the world, thereby challenging common claims that people with autism have a limited ability to understand language, to partake in imaginative play, and to generate the complex theory of mind necessary to appreciate literature.

In Channeling the State Naomi Schiller explores how community television in Venezuela created openings for the urban poor to embrace the state as a collective process with the potential for creating positive social change.

978-1-4780-0105-8.jpgJ. Lorand Matory’s The Fetish Revisited casts an Afro-Atlantic eye on European social theory to show how Marx’s and Freud’s conceptions of the fetish illuminate and misrepresent the nature of Africa’s gods while demonstrating that Afro-Atlantic gods have their own social logic that is no less rational than European social theories.

The contributors to the volume Digital Sound Studies, edited by Mary Caton Lingold, Darren Mueller, and Whitney Trettien, explore the transformative potential of digital sound studies to create rich, multisensory experiences within scholarship, building on the work of digital humanists to evaluate and historicize new technologies and forms of knowledge.

Domestication Gone Wild, a collection edited by Heather Anne Swanson, Marianne Elisabeth Lien, and Gro B. Ween, offers a revisionary exploration of domestication as a narrative, ideal, and practice that reveals how our relations with animals and plants are intertwined with the politics of human difference.

978-0-8223-7075-8.jpgIn Paradoxes of Hawaiian Sovereignty J. Kēhaulani Kauanui examines contradictions of indigeneity and self-determination in U.S. domestic policy and international law, showing how Hawaiian elites’ approaches to reforming land, gender, and sexual regulation in the early nineteenth century that paved the way for sovereign recognition of the kingdom complicate contemporary nationalist activism, which too often includes disavowing the indigeneity of indigenous Hawaiians.

James N. Green’s Exiles within Exiles is a biography of the Brazilian revolutionary and social activist Herbert Daniel, whose life and political commitment shaped contemporary debates about social justice, gay rights, and HIV/AIDS.

A Primer for Teaching Women, Gender, and Sexuality in World History, by Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks and Urmi Engineer Willoughby, is a guide for college and high school teachers who are teaching women, gender, and sexuality history for the first time, for experienced teachers who want to reinvigorate their courses, for those who are training future teachers to prepare their own syllabi, and for teachers who want to incorporate the subject into their world history classes.

978-0-938989-42-4.jpgPop América, 1965-1975, edited by Esther Gabara, is a bilingual, fully illustrated catalogue that accompanies a traveling exhibition of the same name. Pop América, 1965-1975 presents a vision of Pop art across the Americas as a whole. The exhibition appears at the McNay Museum of Art in San Antonio from October 4, 2018 until January 13, 2019 and then moves to the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University from February 21 to July 21, 2019. It will finally be featured at the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University from September 21 to December 8, 2019.

In the still-timely twentieth anniversary edition of Written in Stone—which includes a new preface and an extensive afterword—Sanford Levinson considers the debates and conflicts surrounding controversial monuments to public figures throughout the American South and the world.

Never miss a new book! Sign up for Subject Matters, our e-mail newsletter, and get notifications of new titles in your preferred disciplines as well as discounts and other news.

Our 50% Off Sale Ends Today

SeptSale2018_SubjectMatters_300dpi

Attention all procrastinators: our 50% off sale ends tonight at 11:59 eastern time. If you’ve been putting off placing your order, now is the time. Use coupon code FALL50 when you place your order online.

Can’t decide what to buy? Check out our editors recommendations.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 today until 5:00 p.m.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

 

 

Author Events in October

Fall is here and many of our authors are on the road. From Spain to Australia be sure to check some of these events.

978-0-8223-7020-8October 6: See From the Tricontinental to the Global South author Anne Garland Mahler will discuss her book with Stan West at Stony Island Arts Bank.
3:00pm, 6760 S. Stony Island Ave., Chicago, IL 60649

October 7: Videology Bar & Cinema will host a talk for Racquel J. Gates’s new book Double Negative.
5:30pm, 308 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11249

October 9: Laughing at the Devil author Amy Laura Hall will deliver the annual Matthew Simpson Lecture at Simpson College.
7:00pm, 701 North C Street, Indianola, IA 50125

October 12: Allan deSouza will give the keynote at Hallie Ford School of Graduate Studies 2018 Symposium, talking about his new book How Art Can Be Thought.
6:00pm, 511 NW Broadway, Portland, OR 97209

October 13: Authoring Autism author Melanie Yergeau will speak at the Love & Autism conference.
10:45am, Liberty Station Conference Center, 2600 Laning Rd., San Diego, CA, 92106

October 13: See David Grubbs, author of Now that the audience is assembled, and Ralph Savarese, author of See It Feelingly, at the Twin Cities Book Festival.
10:00am, Minnesota State Fairgrounds, 1265 Snelling Ave. N, St. Paul, MN 55108978-1-4780-0130-0.jpg

October 15: Libby Adler speaks at Princeton University about her book Gay Priori.
12:10pm, Princeton Law and Public Affairs Program, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544

October 18: NYU Florence hosts Nicholas Boggs this month. He will give a talk entitled “From Tuscany to Harlem: James Baldwin and Yoran Cazac´s Little Man, Little Man: A Story of Childhood about the research that led to our republication of Baldwin’s lost children’s book.
Time TBA, Villa La Pietra, Via Bolognese, 120,
50139 Florence – Italy

October 20: The Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona will host a conversation with The Communist and the Communist’s Daughter author Jane Lazarre and Bel Olid.
6:00pm, Montalegre, 5 – 08001 Barcelona, Spain

October 23: If you’re in Australia go see Living a Feminist Life author Sara Ahmed give a lecture at The University of Melbourne.
6:30pm, Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia

October 23: M Archive author Alexis Pauline Gumbs will give a lecture at the University of Pennsylvania titled “Code Made Flesh: Sylvia Wynter Oracle.”
4:30pm, Fisher-Bennett Hall – Rm 401, 3340 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6273

October 24: The Wheeler Centre will host a talk with Living a Feminist Life author Sara Ahmed.
6:15pm, 176 Little Lonsdale Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000

October 24: Catch Ralph James Savarese discussing his book See It Feelingly at Prairie Lights bookstore.
7:00pm, 15 South Dubuque St., Iowa City, IA 52240

October 25: The Cow in the Elevator author Tulasi Srinivas will give a talk at Yale’s SASC Colloquium Series.
4:30pm, MacMillan Center, Henry R. Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Ave., New Haven, CT 06520

Living a Feminist LifeOctober 25: Living a Feminist Life author Sara Ahmed will give a lecture at University of Wollongong.
4:30pm, Building 25, Rm 107, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 252, Australia

October 26: See It Feelingly author Ralph James Savarese will speak at the Neurodiversities Symposium at Duke University.
9:00am, 114 South Buchanan Blvd., Smith Warehouse, Bays 4 & 5, Durham, NC 27708

October 26: Landscapes of Power author Dana E. Powell will participate in a panel for her book at the 21st Diné Studies Conference at Diné College.
3:15pm, Ned Hatathli Center, Indian Route 64 & 1 Circle Dr. Tsaile, AZ 86556​

October 30: Katherine Verdery will sign copies of her new book My Life as a Spy at the 92nd Street Y.
12:00pm, 1395 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 10128

October 30: Ralph James Savarese speaks about See It Feelingly at University of Northern Iowa.
Time and location to come.

Our Editors’ Sale Recommendations

Our Fall Sale continues through Monday, October 1. Still thinking about what you want to buy for 50% off? Check out some of our editors’ recommendations.

Courtney Berger,  Senior Editor & Editorial Department Manager

The Pursuit of HappinessBianca Williams’s The Pursuit of Happiness is a beautifully written ethnography of African American women who travel to Jamaica in search of the love, friendship, happiness, and spiritual connection that they isn’t readily available to them in the U.S. She traces the complex transnational affective ties that these women develop through their connections to Jamaica and to one another.

In Atmospheric Things Derek McCormack uses a commonplace object—the balloon—to think about how atmospheres are rendered knowable, both in their material and affective forms.  Moving from hot air balloons to Disney Pixar’s Up to Google’s Project Loon, McCormack considers the balloon as a technology of captivation and as means for giving shape to feelings, experiences, and conditions that often just at the edges of our perception.

978-0-8223-7035-2Moving from air to sea, Across Oceans of Law traces the saga of the Komagata Maru, a ship carrying Punjabi migrants that was refused entry to Vancouver Harbour in 1914. Renisa Mawani deftly uses the story of the ship, of the enigmatic anticolonialist Gurdit Singh who chartered the ship, and of the legal battles that ensued to illustrate the ways that imperial power—and the forms of racism and anti-immigration policy it engenders—is formulated and enacted in the juridical space of the sea.

And, finally, back to land, Brenna Bhandar’s Colonial Lives of Property discloses the ways that property law has served as a foundation for colonial appropriation of land. Bhandar shows how modern formulations of private property have been mobilized to legitimate indigenous dispossession, to install racialized regimes of ownership in settler colonies, and to promote ongoing forms of racial capitalism.

Gisela Fosado, Editor

Murder on Shades MountainMurder on Shades Mountain by Melanie S. Morrison is a gripping must-read for anyone who wants to understand the perversity of white Southern racial culture and resistance to Jim Crow injustices. The story is a testament to the courageous predecessors of present-day movements for Black lives.

Arturo Escobar’s new path-breaking book Designs for the Pluriverse presents a new vision of design theory and practice aimed at channeling design’s world-making and life-changing capacity toward ways of existing that are in line with grass-roots social movements towards justice.

Reclaiming the Discarded by Kathleen Millar is a beautifully written ethnography of Jardim Gramacho, a sprawling garbage dump on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, where roughly two thousand self-employed workers known as catadores collect recyclable materials. Millar shows how the way of life of these catadores calls into question normative assumptions of wage labor and what it means to live a good life.  This prize-winning book is super accessible and great for teaching.

Sandra Korn, Assistant Editor

In these times of political turmoil, I’ve been feeling how important it is to turn to our ancestors for inspiration and guidance. Jane Lazarre’s memoir The Communist and the Communist’s Daughter resonates with my own family history. She writes of her father, born Itzrael Lazarovitz in the Yiddish-speaking old country, who spent his adult life in the US as a Communist Party activist. Even while Lazarre grapples with her father’s radical ideology, she honors his principled internationalism—he fought fascists in the Spanish Civil War—and his tireless anti-racist and pro-labor union activism.

Fugitive LifeStephen Dillon’s Fugitive Life: The Queer Politics of the Prison State brings into view some other inspirational ancestors: queer activists in the 1970s who challenged the rising wave of incarceration. Dillon looks at cultural work by Assata Shakur, Angela Davis, the Weather Underground, and other groups of women and queers, often while they were in prison themselves. These activists used writing, art, and films to understand and resist the neoliberal-carceral state.

I am also drawn to two new books that consider emergent conservative religious communities, both now defunct due to leadership scandals. In Desire Work, Melissa Hackman presents an ethnography of an ex-gay Pentecostal ministry in Capetown, South Africa, where men labored to discipline themselves into heterosexual masculinity in an effort to confirm to Christian values. And Jessica Johnson’s Biblical Porn interrogates how evangelical pastor Mark Driscoll used the affective power of his teachings on biblical sexuality and gender roles to build up a mass following for the Mars Hill Church.

Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director

If one hasn’t already, this is the perfect time to pick up Fred Moten’s brilliant and capacious “consent not to be a single being” trilogy, most recently hailed by New York magazine (and Vulture) as one of 100 books in a “A Premature Attempt at the 21st Century Canon” – a list otherwise centered on literary fiction.  If you only picked up Black and Blur, then you need the complementary but differently focused Stolen Life and The Universal Machine.

978-1-4780-0081-5Imani Perry has just published a trifecta of her own (from three different publishers) and I’m very excited about our contribution, Vexy Thing, a feminist rethinking of the persistence and forms of patriarchy as it persists through so many different intersectional moments of modernity.

I’m also thrilled about the long-awaited publication of Dionne Brand’s The Blue Clerk, at once an embodied conversation of author and self-editor, and a reflection of Black Atlantic and colonial histories.

One of those Black and colonial histories is portrayed in complex and gorgeous fashion in Victorian Jamaica, edited by Tim Barringer and Wayne Modest. The story of Jamaica from the moment of emancipation through to the early 20th century told in pieces by contributors including Catherine Hall and Krista Thompson with 270 full color illustrations.

Decolonizing ExtinctionFinally, I wanted to mention Juno Salazar Parreñas’s Decolonizing Extinction: The Work of Care in Orangutan Rehabilitation.  I think of this brilliant book as a model for future studies the way it seamlessly brings together colonial histories, histories of science, interspecies relations, gender, and possible planetary futures in one engaging study.

 

Now that you have all these great recommendations, get shopping! Enter coupon code FALL50 at checkout. All in-stock books and journal issues are on sale, but journal subscriptions, t-shirts, and society memberships are not. The sale ends Monday, October 1 at 11:59 pm Eastern time.