Open Access Resources Available from Duke University Press

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It’s Open Access Week, a global opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. Duke University Press offers a variety of books, journals, and online collections in an open access format. To learn more about why we consider participating in these initiatives so important, read an interview with our previous director Steve Cohn from last year’s Open Access Week. This year we’re pleased to share some of our open access offerings.

Books

Duke University Press participates in two open access programs to make some of our books available in an open access format: Knowledge Unlatched and TOME. Each year we release about a dozen books that are open access. You may be able to read these books online via your own library. You can also find some of them on Project MUSE, OAPEN, and on our own website. Recent books that are available in an open access format include The News at the Ends of the Earth by Hester Blum, Anti-Japan by Leo T. S. Ching, and The Fixer by Charles Piot. 

Journals

Duke University Press’s journals publishing program offers several open-access journals and e-resources:

coverimage1-1Critical Times: Interventions in Global Critical Theory, a new addition to our program, is an online journal sponsored by the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs with the aim of foregrounding the form and global reach of contemporary critical theory.

Environmental Humanities draws humanities scholarship into conversation with natural and social sciences around significant environmental issues.

The Carlyle Letters Online provides access to an outstanding resource in Victorian literature, philosophy, and culture: the letters of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle.

In addition, many introductions to Duke University Press humanities and social sciences journal issues are available for free at read.dukeupress.edu. We also offer several free or low-cost journal access options to libraries in eligible countries.

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Duke University Press and Cornell University Library also jointly manage Project Euclid, a not-for-profit hosting and publishing platform for the mathematics and statistics communities. About 75% of Project Euclid’s hosted content is open access.

Check out some of our previous blog posts for Open Access Week here.

Final Day of Our Fall Sale

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Attention all procrastinators: our 50% off sale ends tonight, October 21, at 11:59 eastern time. If you’ve been putting off placing your order, now is the time. Use coupon code FALL50 when you place your order online.

Can’t decide what to buy? Check out our editors recommendations.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 today until 5:00 p.m.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

More Sale Recommendations from Our Editors

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Still haven’t shopped our Fall Sale? Overwhelmed by all your great choices? We’re pleased to offer recommendations from two of our editors today, Courtney Berger and Gisela Fosado. If you missed them yesterday, check out Elizabeth Ault’s and Ken Wissoker’s recommendations here.

Gisela Fosado, Editor

The ChasersRenato Rosaldo’s beautiful prose poetry collection, The Chasers, gives readers a snapshot of Chicano life in Tucson in the ‘50s. Part club, part friend group, the Chasers were twelve Mexican American high schoolers whose rich stories paint a rich picture of teen life near the border.

Beth Caldwell’s Deported Americans: Life After Deportation to Mexico is a powerful book that traces the impact of deportation on both sides of the border. One of the book’s contributions are Caldwell’s recommended legislative and judicial reforms to alleviate the suffering of millions of Americans affected by deportation.

Patricia Hill Collins’s Intersectionality as Critical Social Theory offers an important new take on how and why intersectionality has not yet realized its potential as a critical social theory. Collins outlines the self-reflexive critical analysis of intersectionality’s assumptions, epistemologies, methodologies and practices that will be a required next step for the concept.

Andrea Ballestero’s A Future History of Water is a smart and beautiful ethnography of the devices that people use make a case for water as a human right. Ballestero demonstrates what happens when instead of trying to fix its meaning, we make water’s changing form the precondition of our analyses.

Courtney Berger, Executive Editor

978-1-4780-0653-4_prBest book to bring with you on a trip: E. Patrick Johnson’s Honeypot: Black Southern Women Who Love Women. Part fiction, part oral history, Honeypot takes us on a journey through Hymen, the women-only world of the U.S. South, to meet queer Black women who boldly share their stories of love, family, heartbreak, coming out, religion, art, and activism. I adore this book and cherished spending time with Dr. EPJ, Miss B, and all the women who lent their voices to this chorus.

The world is on fire, you might want to read: Savage Ecology: War and Geopolitics at the End of the World by Jairus Grove. Grove offers us a martial theory of the Anthropocene. He locates the origins of the planet’s ecological crisis in the geopolitics of war, a world order that that has been organized around colonial expansion, the eradication of generative differences among humans, species, and environments, and the production of technologies and forms of life that are produced to perpetuate warfare and combat.

Cara New Daggett also delves into the relationship between imperialism, contemporary capitalism, and the environment in The Birth of Energy: Fossil Fuels, Thermodynamics, and the Politics of Work. Daggett tells the history of energy as a product of Northern European industrialization and scientific discourse, which yoked moral imperatives about work and productivity with imperial domination and demands for cheap labor. Daggett urges us a post-work energy politics that would decouple the logics of work and energy and challenge the material and moral valuation of waged labor, as well as our fossil fuel reliance.

978-1-4780-0381-6_pr_captechAnd a great pick for teaching: Ruha Benjamin’s edited collection, Captivating Technology: Race, Carceral Technoscience, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life. The contributors to this volume highlight the ways in which policing and prison technologies have been brought to bear on everyday social and economic life, reinforcing racialized imaginaries and perpetuating racialized violence. But the book also offers insights into how such technologies could be retooled and reimagined in the service of building a more just and habitable world.

You can get all these books and more for 50% off through Monday, October 21. Use coupon code Fall50 at checkout. See the fine print here.

 

Sale Recommendations from Our Editors

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If you’re not sure what to buy during our week-long Fall Sale, we’re pleased to present some recommendations from our editors. Today we share suggestions from Editor Elizabeth Ault and Editorial Director Ken Wissoker. Tomorrow look for Executive Editor Courtney Berger’s and Editor Gisela Fosado’s recommendations.

Elizabeth Ault, Editor

Making the World Global I am super-energized following the abolitionist university studies conference held last weekend here at Duke (the second-best thing to happen last week following Bodyminds Reimagined author Sami Schalk’s successful #twerkwithlizzo campaign)! To follow up on the great conversations held there, I highly recommend Isaac Kamola’s Making the World Global and Nathan Snaza’s Animate Literacies. These very different books—Kamola’s on how the concept of “the global university” spread from business schools through every level of higher ed, and Snaza’s on rethinking what we mean by literacy to acknowledge all of the historical and more-than-human forces that shape what and how we read—both help us situate ourselves and our reading, teaching, and studying practices within the historical and spatial contingencies of the universities we do (or don’t!) inhabit.

Other books that are trying to help us reenvision the spaces in which we find ourselves include Justin Izzo’s Experiments with Empire focuses on how experimental writers and ethnographers used the tools of empire and empiricism to imagine solidarities and subjectivities beyond the dyadic frameworks empire sought to impose. And in The Archive of Loss, Maura Finkelstein reconceives of Mumbai’s last remaining textile mill as an archive, full of the stories, affects, aches and pains, of those who have made their livings and their lives there. It’s essential reading for understanding post-industrial melancholy.

CampTVFinally, as the fall television season and all its attendant debates about representation and genre get underway, I recommend revisiting some classic TV through Quinn Miller’s Camp TV, which goes beyond representational critique to imagine the possibilities early television created for queering genders. Or, if you’re missing antiheros among the new crop of shows, check out Angelo Restivo’s Breaking Bad and Cinematic Television, which goes beyond an easy equation of cinema with quality to explore what truly makes television “like the movies,” or Toni Pape’s Figures of Time, which reframes Damages and other early 2000s programs through the lens of preemptive politics.

Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director

It would be difficult (and foolish) not to begin my recommendations with two important books that are both new this month, Sara Ahmed’s What’s the Use: On the Uses of Use and Achille Mbembe’s Necropolitics. Sara Ahmed’s book moves all three of  978-1-4780-0650-3_prher interconnected projects forward at once.  On the face of it a follow-up to The Promise of Happiness and Willfull Subjects, her books which ‘follow words around,’ it also includes much that moves forward from On Being Included on universities and their ways of side-stepping real equality and inclusion, and from Living a Feminist Life with similarly memorable and life-giving recognitions and everyday feminist realities.  Achille Mbembe’s Necropolitics is equally timely and necessary for our lives.  Combining his classic title essay with a translation of his recent politiques de l’inimitié, this is the account we need now of the racist and nationalist state, all-too organized around the right to kill.  A brilliant and useful (that word again) analysis truly needed for our time.

I’m also excited about MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient Julie Livingston’s brand new book, Self-Devouring Growth: A Planetary Parable as Told from Southern Africa. Inspired by Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Livingston take three examples of development that were supposed to lead to a better society — roads, water, and cattle — and shows that as soon as one looks at them from a more transnational perspective, they all make the planet — and the lives of those they were intended to help — worse. It’s a brilliant and engaging analysis of how much modern aid projects have accelerated the anthropocene, however helpful-sounding their infrastructural aims.

Racial MelancholiaEver since its publication last spring, I’ve been proselytizing non-stop for David Eng and Shinhee Han’s Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation: On the Social and Psychic Lives of Asian Americans—the book that we have needed as long as I can remember. A book that puts racialization and it’s effects at the center of the psychoanalytic account—and if psychology is supposed to deal with the constitution of subjects how could that not be central — while still offering a complex and historicized account of cultural and individual lives.  Eng and Han co-wrote it, working on the theory together and using real-life examples from her therapeutic practice. The stories are from Asian Americans and Asians in America, but anyone who thinks about race and personhood in any form will benefit.

I am repeatedly shocked at the bad advice offered to younger scholars, who are told they have to publish in the “right places” or conform to tired disciplinary standards that are busy dying. The last decade has been an open and exciting renaissance moment for intellectual thinking worked through stylish and experimental writing forms. Two leaders in this moment have been Katie Stewart and Lauren Berlant.  Their collaborative work The Hundreds is a masterclass in close attention and eloquent description. I love how Hua Hsu traced its continuity with both authors previous work in his New Yorker essay.  That’s a masterclass too.  In that same brillant direction, the sale is a superb time to be sure one has all three of Fred Moten’s “Consent not to be a single being” trilogy volumes. Widely influential already, they will only become more so.  Finally, I will put in a good word for Benjamin Piekut’s Henry Cow: The World is a Problem which does for the British Marxist post-68 experimental music scene what Tim Lawrence’s work has done for the New York City dance floor, spinning archives and zillions of interviews into a story of musical community, utopic possibilities, and their inevitable limits.

You can get all these books and more for 50% off through Monday, October 21. Use coupon code Fall50 at checkout. See the fine print here.

Save 50% During Our Fall Sale

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You’ve been asking for it and we’re happy to announce that our Fall Sale begins today. Grab brand new titles like Necropolitics by Achille Mbembe and What’s the Use? by Sara Ahmed or stock up on older titles for your comps. Pick up award-winners like Black Feminism Reimagined by Jennifer Nash and Reclaiming the Discarded by Kathleen Millar. Or give the gift of James Baldwin to a young reader this holiday season. Just head to our website and save 50% on all in-stock books and journal issues by entering coupon code FALL50.

Here’s the usual fine print: The discount does not apply to apparel, journals subscriptions, or society memberships. You can’t order out-of-stock or not yet published titles at the discount. And you can’t combine multiple orders to maximize the discount. Regular shipping applies and all sales are final.

If you have any difficulty ordering via our website, you can call our customer service department at 888-651-0122 during regular business hours (Monday-Friday, 8-5 Eastern Time).

The sale ends in one week, on Monday, October 21 at 11:59 Eastern Time. Start shopping now!

Q&A with Brenda R. Weber, Author of Latter-day Screens

weberBrenda R. Weber is Professor of Gender Studies at Indiana University, editor of Reality Gendervision: Sexuality and Gender on Transatlantic Reality Television, and author of Makeover TV: Selfhood, Citizenship, and Celebrity, both also published by Duke University Press. Her newest book, Latter-day Screens: Gender, Sexuality, and Mediated Mormonism examines how mediation of Mormonism through film, TV, blogs, YouTube videos, and memoirs functions as a means to understand conversations surrounding gender, sexuality, spirituality, capitalism, justice, and individualism in the United States.

You mention in the acknowledgements that two of your close friends—fellow non-Mormons who also grew up surrounded by Mormon culture—thought writing the book was a mistake. What was it that allowed you to move beyond their fears (and perhaps your own) and continue on with the project? 

One of the things I try to capture in the memoir section of the book (coming at the end) is the way that Mormonism influenced practically every aspect of my growing up in Mesa, Arizona, because the religion has such a strong set of beliefs practices, and behaviors—through things like what one can eat or drink but also about your use of time and your perceived friendliness. It also set limits on how hard I could think (and still be considered nice) and what exactly I could aspire to become professionally and personally, and it absolutely forbade the legitimacy of LGBT loves or lives. So for me and my other non-Mormon friends, we lived with a constant sense of a very powerful presence that could be felt and could judge us but couldn’t really be detected or blocked, like the air we breathe. It had a way of seeping into us and taking up residence in our bodies. I think my friends and I dealt with this largely by not dealing with it—we left town, moved on, grew up. Writing the book meant dismantling a coping mechanism I had used for nearly 30 years, and my friends were concerned about no longer having this capacity for separation.

As with most of my projects, it was my fascination with learning that made me move beyond those fears. Instead of turning my back and mind on those people and beliefs that had governed my childhood, I became truly interested in understanding the history, culture, and media representations of Mormons, both mainstream and fundamentalist. It was a wonderful way to purge a lot of childhood ghosts, but I do still have anxieties that I can never again go to a high school reunion and I’ve pretty much been de-friended by all of my LDS friends from childhood. And I want to emphasize, this is not something I could have done as a child or a teenager. I needed to be an adult with enough certainty about me that taking a part a necessary scaffolding wouldn’t undo a broader sense of my self.

Images and ideas of Mormonism, or what you call “mediated Mormonism,” are quite powerful cultural tools: You describe mediated Mormonism as a “lens” through which we can see the inner workings and mechanics of American culture. What do you see as particular to the Church of Latter-Day Saints that allows its representations to have this powerful clarifying effect? 

Latter-day ScreensAs an American religion born in the nineteenth century, Mormonism came alive as new possibilities in media were also born. Religion scholars have long talked about the advent of the printing press as presaging both the Protestant Revolution and a spread and diversification of Christianity. Mormonism nicely illustrates this story as well, fittingly in the New World of the Americas where the book is set. The Book of Mormon was first published in Palmyra, New York in 1830. Joseph Smith ordered a run of 5,000 copies (at a cost of $3,000), which is an astronomical number and cost for that time period. But the print run tells us a great deal about the rise of book culture in the United States, the zealous emergence of a number of new religions in this time period, the rise in literacy across more rural parts of the United States, and the general affordability of publishing in this period.

I had an opportunity while researching this book to visit E. B. Grandin, the print shop that made The Book of Mormon, now turned into a site staffed and run by the mainstream LDS Church. While there, I was astounded that if I stood on tippy toes at the back door, I could see the Erie Canal, which was like an information super highway in the nineteenth century, moving goods and in this case ideas across the country and into Canada. With the spread of the book soon went the spread of missionaries, because this has always been a very proselytizing religion.

This circulation of Mormon missionaries and ideas served to crystalize Mormonism as a recognizable “thing” in the culture, what in the book I call Mormonism as a meme. Broader American and even international culture has not always looked on Mormonism in a positive light, but it is often referenced to do a larger symbolic work. So, as we see in the case of Big Love or Sister Wives, fundamentalist Mormons are called upon to serve as “American everymen” who live their lives a little differently. They become proxy figures for asking if there are limits to the American experiment.

You argue that the struggles against norms taking place inside and around Latter-day screens actually become accelerants for social justice. For instance, you discuss how Utah’s dismissal of their case against the polygamous Brown family from Sister Wives coincided with the state’s issuing of licenses for same-sex marriages. What potential (and limitations) do you see in cultural media like reality television to become agents of change in broader legal and political spheres? 

978-0-8223-5682-0_prWell, culture has always been an agent in the legal and political sphere, so it’s not like this is a new thing. Fighting to eradicate slavery, for instance, brought forth a whole new set of protest literatures from slave narratives to sentimental novels.

But as I discuss in my 2014 book Reality Gendervision, people love to hate on TV, particularly reality TV. And don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot to critique, but I don’t think it is the medium itself that is to blame. Perhaps I have convinced myself as a media scholar, but I think the issue is really about critical thinking skills and media literacy. The more people can think critically, the more all kinds of media can be used in beneficial ways.

In the book, you describe the kidnapping victim Elizabeth Smart as a “cultural meme,” serving as a sign of the ultimate innocent victim who meets the affective demand to be “happy” after trauma. How do you see these same demands– for innocent victims who don’t “hold a grudge”—working in our own cultural and institutional logics surrounding sexual assault and violence? Is Smart as a meme a direct mirror for our larger culture, or an exaggeration that allows us to see ourselves more clearly?

I see the image of Elizabeth Smart as absolutely an outlying representation, particularly in an era of #MeToo that asks survivors of sexual assault to claim their stories and to be willing to share their feelings of anger about them. Also, I want to be clear that I don’t fault Elizabeth Smart for her affect. I have no idea what her actual feelings are inside, and she may well have a different emotional experience that she, rightfully, does not divulge as part of her public persona. Or maybe she doesn’t. I wouldn’t want to be understood as saying that Smart is wrong in being happy but that the effect of her affect (if you want to put it this way) is to suggest she will never attack. This, in turn, reinforces normative notions of heteronormative femininity that suggest a woman’s value is heightened through her willingness to put others before herself, including their emotional needs. I use a line in the book from Judith Freeman’s excellent memoir The Latter Days (2017) about receiving instructions on femininity as a young Mormon girl. Freeman and others were given an example of sitting in a church pew and not feeling well. If this happened, they were advised, it would be far better to throw up in your purse than to ask others to stand up so that you could get to the restroom. Better to barf in a handbag! That’s the kind of gender identity at the heart of the happy affect I examine in the book.

You close your book by discussing LGBT+ Mormons and their relationship with media as a space for self-recognition, working against patterns in the church where a denial of self-knowledge is often a condition of subjectivity, like in the show My Husband’s Not Gay. Do you think that twenty-first century social media can accomplish this self-representation in a new way that television cannot?

I wouldn’t say that it is mutually exclusive (either television can do it better or social media does) but cumulative. When I use the phrase Latter-day Screens, this is exactly what I’m getting at – that cultural ideas, impressions, and images are produced through a conversation between different media platforms (television, feature film, memoir) and through both high and low, professional and amateur production, all coming together in these relatively coherent symbols that are labeled “Mormon.”

Ideas change through continual and repeated exposure to an idea. Just this week, for example, a new television show popped onto my TIVO, called Trapped: The Alex Cooper Story (Lifetime, released September 28, 2019). It offers a made-for-television version of the 2016 memoir Saving Alex, written by Alex Cooper. Cooper writes about being raised LDS and coming out to her parents, who in desperation, forcibly put her in reparation therapy. It’s a brutal, sad story with a triumphant ending. But Saving Alex is not a singular story—there are many memoirs about LGBT+ lives and loves and the hardship of living as gay and Mormon, many of them self-published, many others serving as the backbone of film or television representation (as for instance in The Falls: Testament of Love or Latter Days).

Social media is critical to all of this because it is immediate and it is amateur, meaning one doesn’t require a ten-million dollar budget and backing from Hollywood before telling one’s truth, or testifying (a key tenet of Mormonism). Mediation, as we discussed in the first question, here serves as quintessentially Mormon, or, as many of the people who create media content around Mormonism say, “As out-Mormoning the Mormons.” Dan Reynolds, the lead singer of Imagine Dragons, says it most powerfully in the documentary Believer,

There’s one thing my Mormon values have taught me since I was young. It’s that no matter what the world says about who you are, what you believe, still do it. A hundred percent. That spirit was the spirit that carried me through my mission. I felt like I was baring my truth regardless what anyone thought about me. That’s all because of Mormonism and my parents, they all prepped me for this moment now. A determined Mormon is a scary thing, I will tell you that. Because they don’t stop. I knocked a hundred doors to get into one door. I knocked a thousand doors on my mission. If there’s one thing I can guarantee it’s that I will continue to knock this door until somebody answers.

That’s on page 21 of my book, if anyone wants to read more!

What is something you hope readers will take away from this in-depth account of the various ways in which Mormonism circulates in our media?

In terms of media, I hope that readers perceive the clarifying capacities of Mormonism, when we understand it as both a way of seeing and a way of thinking. Really, my book is not so much about Mormons as people or Mormon ideas. Instead, it’s about Mormonism as an idea. Decoding its many values is a bit like taking apart a complex engine, in that we really begin to see and understand how bits and pieces work together to create something far bigger than the sum of its parts.

In terms of the overall project, I hope that readers see that everyone has a story worth telling, and I hope they understand my regard toward actual Mormon people as being not judgmental but also not completely sympathetic. For me, my experience with the influence of Mormonism helped me understand the workings of hegemony, a critical term within gender studies that is often used and seldom defined. But basically, hegemony has to do with the invisible systems that compel people not only to act in ways opposite to their self-interest but also to believe those power relations are superior to other ways, so they champion their continuation. I had a hard time understanding how I could never have been formally schooled in the values of Mormonism yet knew the codes so well I had internalized them. Writing this book allowed me to understand that hegemonic process more and in so doing to be free of them in some ways.

Read the introduction to Latter-day Screens free online and save 30% on the paperback edition using coupon code E19WEBER.

 

 

Interview with EASTS editor Wen-Hua Kuo

IMG_20190909_143508646Wen-Hua Kuo is editor in chief of East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal (EASTS) and Professor at the Institute of Science, Technology and Society and the Institute of Public Health at National Yang-Ming University in Taiwan. We sat down with him to discuss the history of EASTS, what sets the journal apart, and where EASTS is heading from here.

How did you come to be involved with EASTS?

I’ve been involved with the journal since its inception. When EASTS was in its preparation, I was in the United States; I earned my degree in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) at MIT. When I finished my degree, I started participating in activities like attending the annual meetings of 4S, the Society for Social Studies of Science—the first time I attended was in 2006. This was about the same time that scholars in Taiwan were trying to become more international in their approach to the history and philosophy of science. We had published an English journal on the history and philosophy of science (an STS-related field in the East Asian context) with a local publisher, but it didn’t work out. This time, we had the support of the Ministry of Science and Technology in Taiwan, which recognized science studies as an emerging topic and had the mission of promoting our work to a wider readership. I feel very lucky to have joined the journal at the very beginning—at that time, although we had several scholars working in STS, I was one of only a handful with a degree in the field.

13-3What qualities set EASTS apart from other journals in the field?

First, there are several journals published in Asia, but even some journals with longer histories than us still have some trouble with English. Although we’re not native English speakers, we’re very careful about that. We feel like for new topics like STS, you need to speak the same language so that it’s readable for scholars and for a common understanding of theoretical terms. You need some common ground to start with.

On another front, we treasure local communities: this was the most important feature in mind when we started EASTS. We’re not just a channel between Taiwan and the rest of the world; we want to see interactions among Asian societies. We intentionally set up an editorial structure to reflect that at the beginning, and we keep that tradition in mind while reviewing or soliciting papers or opening up special issues.

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Can you talk about EASTS’s rich archive of special issues?

Over the years, we’ve created many special issues—probably ⅔ of our issues are thematic. This is one of the ways we recognize local traditions. The cover of our issue “Life, Science, and Power in History and Philosophy” (13.1) features a bust that’s instantly recognizable to people from Japan, especially those involved in the history of medicine, and it tells a story.

A good thing about special issues is that you can have local scholars control the quality of the issue and invite or encourage local contributors. The journal’s structure sets some basic limitations and provides a form that scholars can build on with their own creative, innovative sense. In that sense, Duke University Press did a great job working with us on that because we have a structure for our scholarship.

13-2What are you looking for in submissions now?

Our main source is international meetings, like 4S. We also attend regional conferences or conferences on Asian studies. This is very competitive work; at every conference, people compete for visibility. One phenomenon we’ve observed is that there are more and more STS or science panels at Asian studies conferences. That’s very different from what we had 10 years ago when I was a graduate student—in Asian studies, the dominant topics were culture, language, religion.

We also now have some local STS societies in East Asia: Japan, Taiwan, and Korea, and we’ve seen sizable submissions from some of these areas. And we value using the lens of STS to explore understudied areas such as the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, and even Cambodia and India. That’s something we didn’t expect in the beginning, but we’re interested in providing good scholarship on these areas.

How would you like to shape the journal’s direction going forward?

We want to return to something universal, which is a bit of a conceptual change. Historically, we’ve emphasized the regional: providing scholarship on areas that are overlooked, understudied, marginalized, or even distorted by mainstream narratives. Now, though, it’s time for us to consider region as a lens for looking at the world. Some people assume that Asia is like Mars or the moon, separated from the rest of the world—but instead, through empirical studies or case studies on Asia, you can see the world in a different way.

We want to change the world through Asia. We want to pay more attention to connections, behaviors, common interests, collaborations, rather than just focusing on the differences between regions. That’s how we can creatively deal with global issues.

Read EASTS online, subscribe, or sign up to receive email alerts when new issues are published.

New Books in October

It’s official—fall has arrived! With the start of this new season, we’re releasing dynamic new reads in art and visual culture, anthropology, feminist studies, cultural studies, sociology, and more. Check out all of these exciting books available in October.

Continuing the work she began in The Promise of Happiness and Willful Subjects by taking up a single word and following its historical, intellectual, and political significance, Sara Ahmed explores how use operates as an organizing concept, technology of control, and tool for diversity work in What’s the Use?

In Where Histories Reside Priya Jaikumar examines seven decades of films shot on location in India to show how attending to filmed space reveals alternative timelines and histories of cinema as well as the myriad ways cinema constructs India as a place.

Eva Haifa Giraud contends in What Comes after Entanglement? that recent theory that foregrounds the ways that human existence is entangled with other nonhuman life and the natural world often undermine successful action and calls for new modes of activist organizing and theoretical critique.

The contributors to Reading Sedgwick (edited by Lauren Berlant) reflect on the long and influential career of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, whose pioneering work in queer theory has transformed understandings of affect, intimacy, politics, and identity.

Conceptualizing anthropology as a mode of practical and transformative inquiry in A Possible Anthropology, Anand Pandian stages an ethnographic encounter with the field in an effort to grasp its impact on the world and its potential for addressing and offering solutions to the profound crises of the present.

In Symbolic Violence Michael Burawoy brings Pierre Bourdieu into an extended debate with Marxism by outlining the parallels and divergences between Bourdieu’s thought and preeminent Marxist theorists including Gramsci, Fanon, Beauvoir, and Freire.

Achille Mbembe theorizes the genealogy of the contemporary world—one plagued by inequality, militarization, enmity, and a resurgence of racist, fascist, and nationalist forces—and calls for a radical revision of humanism a the means to create a more just society in Necropolitics.

In Fidel between the Lines Laura-Zoë Humphreys tracks late-socialist Cuba’s changing dynamics of social criticism and censorship through Cuban cinema and its cultural politics.

In A Fragile Inheritance, Saloni Mathur investigates the work of two seminal figures from the global South: the New Delhi-based critic and curator Geeta Kapur and contemporary multimedia artist Vivan Sundaram, illuminating  how their political and aesthetic commitments intersect and foreground uncertainty, difficulty, conflict, and contradiction.  

Ronak K. Kapadia examines multimedia visual art by artists from societies besieged by the US war on terror in Insurgent Aesthetics, showing how their art offers queer feminist critiques of US global warfare that forge new aesthetic and social alliances with which to sustain critical opposition to the global war machine.

In Eros Ideologies Laura E. Pérez analyzes Latina art to explore a new notion of decolonial thought and love based on the integration of body, mind, and spirit that offers a means to creating a more democratic and just present and future.

Edited by Frances Richard, I Stand in My Place with My Own Day Here features essays by more than fifty renowned international writers considering thirteen monumental works of art commissioned by The New School between 1930 and the present. We are distributing this beautiful art book for The New School.

Between Form and Content is a catalog that accompanied the first exhibition to focus on Jacob Lawrence’s experience at Black Mountain College in North Carolina in 1946, where his interaction with Josef Albers had a lasting impact on his future career. We are distributing this catalog for Black Mountain College Museum + Art Center.

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Author Events in October

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Fall is finally here and many of our authors are on the road. Whether you’re in the U.S., Canada, or Euope there are many opportunities to see your favorite DUP author.

October 1: See Fugitive Modernities author Jessica Krug will participate in the IDS Public Lecture Series.
7:00pm, Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, 41 Cooper Square, New York, NY 10003

October 2: Pop América, 1965–1975 curator Esther Gabara will be in conversation at The Block Museum of Art.
6:00pm, 40 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston, IL 60208

October 2: What’s the Use? author Sara Ahmed will lecture at the West End Cultural Centre.
5:00pm, 586 Ellice Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 1Z8

October 3: Book Culture will host a book talk with Angelo Restivo for her book Breaking Bad and Cinematic Television.
7:00pm, 536 West 112th Street, New York, NY 10025

October 3: There will be a launch party for Rebecca Zorach’s book Art for People’s Sake at Sandmeyer’s Bookstore.
6:00pm, 714 S Dearborn St, Chicago, IL 60605

October 3: University of the Witwatersrand will host a lecture with Critique of Black Reason author Achille Mbembe.
5:30pm, 1 Jan Smuts Avenue, Braamfontein 2000, Johannesburg, South Africa

October 4: What’s the Use? author Sara Ahmed will lecture at McGill University.
6:00pm, McIntyre Medical Bldg, Rm 522, 3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6 Canada

October4: Join Savage Ecology author Jairus Grove and his colleagues at the University of Hawai’i Manoa Department of Political Science for a book launch.
2:30pm, Saunders 624, 2424 Maile Way, Honolulu, HI 96822

October 8: Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU will host a roundtable with Duke University Press authors Kandice Chuh, Allan deSouza, and Gayatri Gopinath.
6:00pm, Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 285 Mercer St, 4th Flr, New York, NY 10003

October 9: Rachel Douglas will be at the University of Glasgow‘s Hunterian Museum to discuss her latest book Making The Black Jacobins.
2:00pm, Gilbert Scott Building, University Ave, Glasgow G12 8QQ United Kingdom

October 10: The Hagley Library will host a book talk for Bright Signals author Susan Murray.
7:00pm, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington, DE 19807

October 11: Celebrate the release of Benjamin Piekut’s book Henry Cow at the Emily Harvey Foundation hosted by Blank Forms.
6:30pm, 537 Broadway, New York, New York 10012

978-1-4780-0466-0October 11: The University of Alberta will host a lecture with Animate Literacies author Nathan Snaza.
12:00pm, 11210 87 Avenue Northwest, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2T9 Canada

October 13: Benjamin Piekut will discuss his new book Henry Cow at Cafe Oto.
2:30pm, 18–22 Ashwin street, Dalston, London E8 3DL United Kingdom

October 15: The Humanities Institute will have Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation coauthor David L. Eng.
4:00pm, UC Santa Cruz, Humanities 1, Rm 202, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064

October 16: See Henry Cow author Benjamin Piekut at Bluetopia in Rome.
TBD, Via del Pigneto, 116, 00176 Roma RM, Italy

October 17: Benjamin Piekut will have a book event at a-Musik for his book Henry Cow.
7:30pm, Kleiner Griechenmarkt 28-30, 50676 Cologne, Germany

October 17: Bookworks will host a book talk with The Chasers author Renato Rosaldo.
6:00pm, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW, Albuquerque, NM 87107

October 18: Malmö University will host a lecture by What’s the Use? author Sara Ahmed.
3:15pm, Nordenskiöldsgatan 10, 211 19 Malmö

October 18: Avant-Garde Fascism author Mark Antliff will speak at The John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute.
9:30am, 114 South Buchanan Blvd, Smith Warehouse, Durham, NC 27708

October 20: New York City’s Bluestockings bookstore hosts a book launch for Queering Black Atlantic Religions by Roberto Strongman.
7:00pm, Bluestockings Bookstore, Café, & Activist Center, 172 Allen St, New York, New York 10002

October 21: Book launch for Gökçe Günel’s Spaceship in the Desert hosted by LSE Middle East Centre and Social Life of Climate Change.
6:00pm, NAB.104, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE

October 25: The John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute will also feature Black Performance Theory editor Thomas DeFrantz.
9:30am, 114 South Buchanan Blvd, Smith Warehouse, Durham, NC 27708

National Hispanic Heritage Month Reads

September 15th through October 15th is National Hispanic American Heritage Month. To celebrate, we have selected several of our recent books and journal issues that explore Chincanx and Latinx studies, art, and history, as well as bring awareness to issues faced by the Latinx community.

978-0-8223-6938-7_prIn Eros IdeologiesLaura E. Pérez analyzes Latina art to explore a new notion of decolonial thought and love based on the integration of body, mind, and spirit that offers a means to creating a more democratic and just present and future.

Renato Rosaldo’s new prose poetry collection, The Chasers, shares his experiences and those of his group of twelve Mexican-American Tucson High School friends known as the Chasers as they grew up, graduated, and fell out of touch, conveying the realities of Chicano life on the borderlands from the 1950s to the present.

In Deported Americans, legal scholar and former public defender, Beth C. Caldwell, tells the story of dozens of immigrants who were deported from the United States—the only country they have ever known—to Mexico, tracking the harmful consequences of deportation for those on both sides of the border.

Chicano and Chicana ArtChicano and Chicana Art, curated by Jennifer A. González, C. Ondine Chavoya, Chon Noriega, and Terezita Romo, is an anthology that includes essays from artists, curators, and critics and provides an overview of the history and theory of Chicano/a art from the 1960s to the present, emphasizing the debates and vocabularies that have played key roles in its conceptualization.

Pop América, 1965–1975, edited by Esther Gabara, is a bilingual, fully illustrated catalogue. It accompanies the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University’s exhibition Pop América, 1965–1975, which presents a vision of Pop art across the Americas as a whole.

coverimage-3Trans Studies en las Américas,” a special issue of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, is an unprecedented English-language collection by Latin American and Latinx scholars on trans and travesti issues. Contributors offer a hemispheric perspective on trans and travesti issues, expand transgender studies to engage geopolitical connections, and bring interdisciplinary approaches to topics ranging from policy to cultural production.

With roots in protest and social change, Latinx theater carries an artistic vitality and urgency that has only been augmented by resistance to the current wave of repressive white nationalism. In “What’s Next for Latinx?“, an issue of Theater, contributors ask where Latinx theater is going and what challenges it faces.